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Once and Doctor Who Star Arthur Darvill Is Taking Your Questions!

first_img Show Closed This production ended its run on Jan. 4, 2015 Star Files Arthur Darvill is going from the Irish pub of Once to Broadway.com’s illustrious Ask a Star couch! Find out what Darvill loves about playing down-on his-luck-guitarist Guy in the hit Broadway musical, what it was like performing at the Tony Awards, his favorite pint to order at pub or his most cherished memory from his time on the hit BBC sci-fi series Doctor Who. Submit your questions for Arthur Darvill below, and check back on Broadway.com in the coming weeks for his responses. View Comments Related Showscenter_img Once <a data-cke-saved-href="https://broadway.wufoo.com/forms/z7w5k1/" href="https://broadway.wufoo.com/forms/z7w5k1/">Fill out my Wufoo form!</a> Arthur Darvilllast_img read more

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stop. reset. Playwright Regina Taylor on the Uncertain Future of Technology & How Books Shaped Her Life

first_img Ames, whose only heir has died, begins to think the young J may have insight into preserving his legacy. The only problem is that J, a disconnected soul, has no interest in the past. Ames tries to negotiate with J to embed himself into the future. Related Shows About the author: Over the last three decades, Regina Taylor has had not one, but three versatile careers as an acclaimed actress, playwright and director. On the Great White Way, for example, Taylor has the distinction of being the first black woman to play Juliet in Romeo and Juliet. On the small screen, she garnered a Golden Globe Award and an Emmy nomination for her portrayal of housekeeper and civil rights activist Lilly Harper in I’ll Fly Away. As a playwright, she penned and directed the 2002 musical Crowns, a coming-of-age story accompanied by gospel and hip-hop music. This season, Taylor is back off-Broadway at Signature Theatre Company as writer and director of stop. reset., an ensemble drama that explores the inevitability of a future without books. Below, she recounts the inspiration for her new passion project and remembers her own childhood fascination with literature. E-books are now outselling physical books. Soon there may be no more bookstores or libraries. Schools are switching to computers. Young people growing up may not have the experience of actual books. What does that mean in terms of how we look at the world? What will take the place of books—a means of passing on history and memory—in a world where legacy can be deleted? I became fearful of the prospect. stop. reset. I started looking around. Across the street from where I live—my favorite bookstore, where I would browse every other day—closed its doors. It is when he begins to have a conversation with J—a 19-year-old janitor—that things take a turn. J is semiliterate—and the most tech-savvy person in the office. Everyone assumes they know where J is from. He is the present day incarnation of Ralph Ellison’s Invisible Man. As Ames and J wrestle with each other’s perspectives, the play rushes into the surreal and sci-fi of our present future. The play lives on stage at Signature Theatre through amazing collaborators: designers Neil Patel (set), Shawn Sagady (projections), Karen Perry (costumes), Rob Kaplowitz (sound) and Lap Chi Chu (lights); amazing actors Carl Lumbly, Ismael Cruz Cordova, LaTanya Jackson, Teagle Bougere, Michi Barall and Donald Mackay. All have brought their unique voices to create a shared language. Suddenly I felt like my Grandma, who didn’t believe man had walked on the moon, saying, “Can’t see nobody up there,” when she looked into the night sky—searching. And at a certain point she refused to be shoved onto another contraption. Done. stop. reset. is about Alexander Ames, owner of Alexander Ames Chicago Black Book Publisher. He is on a deadline demanded by a clause in a recent merger. He must adapt or become extinct. He is challenged to get the company up to speed with technology. He must also cut staff when the staff has already been cut to the bone. Ames begins to question each of his workers, all of whom are 40 and over, to see whose position is obsolete. Each represents the multiple constructs of identity. Ames has to question himself on this day, as businessman, African-American, husband and father. He has to question all the traditions and principles on which he stands. Books, to me, are vessels of history and memory. They have helped define who I am. As a child, one of my earliest memories was being on the floor with my mother with construction paper, crayons and scissors—writing my own children’s books. I don’t think I was more than five. My mother empowered me in teaching me how to imagine worlds through my own lens and make them concrete—a survival tool for an African-American female born of a single mother in the south. This tool helped me to create my own names, as the world is constantly naming me even before my first breath. We have a tendency to look at others through the lens of history and memory. Certain assumptions grab hold beyond our own memory and history. Certain things we want to hold onto. Other things we want to let go—and write our own. Breaking open a book is like standing on cracking ice. You fall through and travel backward and forward in time, submerged in the life of someone you think is different than you. Last page, you return to yourself with different eyes. stop. reset. takes place a few months from now. It is the end of 2013. Chicago. We are in the second term of our first African-American president. We are marking the 50th anniversaries of the March on Washington and the bombings in Birmingham. Gay marriage rights were set before the Supreme Court this year;  abortion rights for women were argued in Texas. People are questioning if we are moving forward or backward. I was blown away when Jim Houghton, founder of Signature Theatre, gave me a call with the offer of becoming part of “Residency Five.” Signature would commission me to write three plays that they would produce over a five-year period. Writers in residency five include Will Eno, Annie Baker, Martha Clarke, Katori Hall, Brandon Jacobs-Jenkins and Kenneth Lonergan. What a great opportunity as a writer! Houghton encouraged me to think outside the box. Where to begin? What did I need to say? View Comments Cell phones, iPads, Google Glass, Twitter, 3-D copying machines, cyborg enhancements, cochlear implants, pacemakers, embedded technology, the drive to inhabit Mars. The trajectory of change in this moment is astronomical. How can we keep up? And in adapting, who do we become? What do we hold on to? What can we afford to let go of? stop.reset. also lives through students I’ve worked with from Chicago Urban League, SAIC, DePaul University and Columbia College as well as New York’s Theater Development Fund and Rosie’s Kids. Through a series of workshops the students had dialogues about the play and created their own pieces in response. What they created is featured at the Signature Theatre and at stop-reset.com. It is a play that challenges boundaries of how we experience theater in this high tech age.  Show Closed This production ended its run on Sept. 29, 2013last_img read more

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Find Out the Sexy Secrets of Zachary Levi, Krysta Rodriguez and More in the New Broadway.com Video Series First Date Flirts!

first_img Star Files View Comments First Date Show Closed This production ended its run on Jan. 5, 2014 Related Shows Zachary Levi Ever wanted to know the name of Zachary Levi’s first crush? Dying to find out the wildest place Krysta Rodriguez has kissed someone? Get to know the romantic secrets of all the cast members in Broadway’s hilarious musical comedy First Date with Broadway.com’s brand new video series First Date Flirts!Starting Monday, September 16, we’ll be rolling out exclusive interviews and confessions of the show’s sexy, funny cast members, including Sara Chase, Blake Hammond, Bryce Ryness, Kristoffer Cusick and Kate Loprest.First Date Flirts will give you the lowdown on the cast members’ most horrifying pick-up lines, best excuses for getting out of dates, celebrity crushes, wildest nights out and more! By the time we’re done, you’ll know way more than you ever thought you would about Broadway’s funniest cast of romantics.Tune in to Broadway.com next week for the first episode of First Date Flirts—and get plenty more exclusive First Date video content with Krysta Rodriguez’s backstage video blog Kiss & Tell!last_img read more

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Sound of Music Live! Poll Top Three: Fans Adored Audra McDonald’s Emotional ‘Climb Ev’ry Mountain’

first_img Laura Benanti 2. “How Can Love Survive” – 7% Nary a care in the world have we when Laura Benanti is around. She has just the voice, the acting chops and the snark to play Baroness Elsa—and she joined the Sound of Music live Tweet-fest seconds after her final exit (“Elsa OUT!”). Add in the always hilarious Christian Borle as Max and Stephen Moyer as the surprisingly excellent Captain, and you’ve got a hit. And is that Mary Poppins pouring a spot of tea? 1. “Climb Ev’ry Mountain” – 48% After getting a sneak preview of Audra’s performance at the Rockefeller Center tree lighting on December 4, we knew her “Climb Ev’ry Mountain” was going to be something special. The five-time Tony winner has some pretty high standards to live up to, and McDonald completely owned this showstopper. Even Carrie Underwood was reduced to tears! Audra McDonald Christian Borle The Sound of Music Live!center_img View Comments The Sound of Music Live! was the highlight of our week (can we do it again next Thursday?!), featuring American Idol winner Carrie Underwood, True Blood fave Stephen Moyer and the Tony-winning trifecta of Audra McDonald, Laura Benanti and Christian Borle. It was a wonderful evening of musical theater for all—and no one even fell over! After the flurry of Sound of Music Tweets subsided last night, we asked you to pick your favorite song from the NBC live event. The results were close…Oh, who are we kidding, they weren’t at all. Audra won, like she always does. Read below to revisit the top three musical numbers of the night! 3. “Sixteen Going on Seventeen” – 6% The third-place trophy goes to a sweet rendition of “Sixteen Going on Seventeen” by two stellar newcomers, Ariane Rinehart and Michael Campayno. In the live telecast we witnessed the exact moment the careers of these two budding stars shot into the stratosphere. Rinehart, currently a student at Barnard College and Campayno, a senior at Carnegie Mellon, just got 18.5 million new fans. Can’t wait to see you both on Broadway! Star Fileslast_img read more

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More Magazine News: Rouleur Now Every Two Months

first_imgAnd, um, that’s it really. It’s good news: Rouleur, while slightly po-faced at times, is for me far and away the best source of good writing on cycling. Focused very much on road riding, and majoring on the history of road racing, it features stunning archive photography and new work from some great snappers. The picture here is by Taz Darling of Yozo Shimano. There’s an interview with him and the beginnings of a history of his company in the current issue, as well as pieces on nutrition, Team Z and a photo story of the Tour of California.last_img read more

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Bikerumor Brings Neil Pryde Demo to Greensboro, NC

first_imgNeilpryde Alize Dura AceBikerumor.com is bringing the U.S. rep for Neil Pryde bikes to Greensboro with a small fleet of demo Alize and Diablo road bikes this Sunday, November 14, 2010.Neil Pryde bikes were designed by BMW Designworks USA with two models, both of which come in at 15lbs plus change with Dura-Ace. They’re sweet looking, as you’d expect from any product borrowing the German automaker’s design studio, they’re light and well spec’d. You can check out our post on their bikes here.Check out Neil Pryde’s website for full specs and to check out their sizing calculator (click on a model, then a spec level).They’ll have a range of bikes in M, L, XL and XXL available to use for the local Sunday 11am group ride, and rep (and former Euro pro) Clive de Sousa will have Starbucks coffee and snacks for you while you’re getting fitted. If you’re interested, contact Clive to reserve a bike at 864-252-0001 or via email.NOTE: You’ll need to meet with Clive at 10am in order to be properly fitted in time for the ride, and he’s joining us on the ride to answer any questions. Contact him for location, it’ll be near the ride start.last_img read more

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First Look! Ridley’s New Aero Noah FB with Integrated Brakes on Frame, Fork

first_imgF Brake Video shows the integrated brakes.The new F Split Fork with aero slits to reduce turbulence at the front wheel.F Surface patches use a rough surface treatment to create a bit of an eddy at the front of the tube which makes the air hug the back of the tube closer. Ridley’s launching their completely new Noah FB aero road bike today claiming to be the first bicycle with brakes completely integrated into the frame and fork.We’ve seen bikes like the Storck with brakes built into the frame and fork as bolt-on components, but Ridley’s is the first to completely mold the stoppers directly into the frame and fork. We’ve got pics and more specs coming, but wanted to get these videos up as we got them. Teaser above, and three more detailed movies after the break…last_img read more

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Light Meets Technology, Xlerad Produces The Smartest Light That’s Ever Been Seen

first_imgAs the purists that we cyclists tend to be, when we encounter the crossroad of quality and cost, as we often do, it is quality that usually wins out. And this is a good thing; it’s why you read BikeRumor, to keep apprised of the latest and greatest. Well, we’ve got another one for ya. Xlerad is reinventing the lighting game and they want you in on the ground-level.How do you improve something as relatively straight-forward as a light? Recently everyone has been answering that question by making the light brighter. And that’s kinda like camera manufacturers jamming more and more megapixels into their point-&-shoots; it made sense up to a point, but then it became just another marketing ploy. See how Xlerad has revolutionized your next light with auto illumination (sans any ploys) next… Auto Illumination utilizes several integrated sensors including temperature, battery and a three-axes accelerometer. Xlerad states this technology allows its buttonless light to sense riding conditions (plus its own internal performance) and self-adjust into the best possible lighting level for its top-end CREE single-die LEDs. Your light will now think for itself. But in the case you wish to do the thinking yourself the Xlerad is manually override-able via tapping the light itself. (Checkout the above Kickstarter video for further details.)And the complex algorithm that this baby runs data through spits our some common sense. Picking up speed on the downhill? Xlerad turns up the lumens. Hitting a banked turn, or simply taking a left at the intersection? Xlerad bumps up the brightness. When you are simply cruising Xlerad will drop the power down and conserve juice. All this ramping up and down (200 to 1000 lumen range) occurs in an elegantly seamless manner. And with the aforementioned internal assessment Xlerad will grow more conservative in its lumen output as its 5000mAh Lithium-ion battery approaches depletion – meaning a highly impressive battery life of 3.7 to 45 hours (depending on how you ride).Now let’s mention size, cuz, it matters. Xlerad takes up little handlebar real estate. And with its ability to self assess and auto adjust, this waterproof light will never overheat (a longterm performance risk with high-output LEDs). What does this mean for you, the cycling purist? It means the Xlerad has the highest maximum power (1000 lumens) of any light in its size category. Xlerad can be yours exclusively through Kickstarter until January 1 for a highly reasonable $189 (March 2014 delivery). Merry Christmas to you!last_img read more

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EB13: Formula 35 Suspension Fork with New Internals, Massive Adjustability – Plus Road Hydro…

first_imgThe new Formula 35 fork gets them into bigger wheel sizes.Their 33, which we reviewed here, is only for 26″ wheels. The 35 will be available for 650B and 29er, with travel set at 100-160mm and 100-140mm respectively. Travel is internally adjustable in 10 and 15 millimeter increments with internal spacers. You’ll have to pull the lowers, which means the oil bath that lubricates the sliders will have to be refilled, but they say it’s an easy adjustment. You’ll be able to order it at whatever length you want, though.What’s particularly impressive is the wide range of adjustability – everything from the expected compression and rebound down to the position of the adjustment knobs is up to you… The crown and arch is heavily shaped.The cartridge unit is new and uses an expanding rubber bladder reservoir rather than just pushing the oil into the top part of the cartridge like the 33. Sales & Tech Support Manager Jeff Stoudt says this improves small bump sensitivity.It has a massive amount of adjustability, with compression, threshold and lockout controls on the top.Rebound is on the bottom, and that knob pulls out to provide the tool for the threshold control.The top cap with the controls will rotate by loosening a set screw. This serves two purposes: it allows OEM customers to position the lockout knob so it doesn’t hit the crown, and it lets the end user rotate it so the lever is exactly where it’s easiest for them to use. Even better, the threads on either side of the fork are the same, so you could switch the damping cartridge to the left side of the fork and the spring stack to the right. If you wanted. Stoudt says you can do it in about five minutes, including replacing the oil.Speaking of oil, they use Ballistol Oil (commonly found in hardware stores internationally), and by adjusting the amount in the air chamber, you can fine tune the spring rate. More oil makes it more progressive.The cartridge uses a Directional Floating Seal (aka cup seal, similar to what’s used on their master cylinder pistons). As it compresses and oil pressure builds, it bulges a bit to provide a tighter seal. It’s a tiny lip, though, so it’s not adding noticeable friction.Not shown, they offer a hydraulic remote lockout that’s better than what’s offered on the 33. Instead of replacing the entire top cap and losing the compression damping controls, it simply hoses into the lockout lever hole and lets you keep the other controls.Two thru axle options are available. Shown above is the standard, tooled version.Or, if you don’t mind an extra 26g, there’s a QR lever version that provides a big lever to tighten the axle down by spinning it in until it’s close, then closing the lever. The trick part is that you can slide the lever out, and its shaft has a standard hex shape and a 12-sided hole so you can slide it back in at virtually any angle you like. No more levers sticking randomly forward or down.Claimed weight is 1650g for the 650B and 1700g for the 29er, both with uncut tapered steerers and no axle. Stoudt says on the samples he’s received, once the steerer is cut and the axle’s in place, they’re coming in lighter than claimed. We’re hoping to test that claim with a review unit this fall.FORMULA RR1 Di2 ROAD HYDRAULIC DISC BRAKESWe snapped this pic at Crankworx with a promise to get back to you with more info. Unfortunately, the story’s not as good as we’d hoped.The RR1 will only work with first gen Dura-Ace Di2 10-speed, not the current E-Tube groups. Bringing it up to date isn’t likely a project they’ll tackle now that Shimano has their own full hydraulic system. They will, however, continue to develop their Campy road hydraulic brake setup to some extent, but they’re waiting to see how they can work out warranties on the shifting parts since they don’t fully control those parts. The system developed for Colnago is still exclusive to them and led that project, so Campy was involved with parts of that system. All those factors would have to come together again under Formula’s guidance for a standalone EPS brakset to be developed. We’ll keep you posted.last_img read more

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Light Up More than the Road with the The Unique Ding Bike Light

first_imgThe Ding is a fairly compact unit measuring 2″ wide, 3″ long and 1.6″ deep and weighing in at 110g. It uses a rotating clamp that hangs either under your handlebars or your stem to ensure the downward beam isn’t blocked. The strap connects to a light holster so you can quickly un-clip the light itself and leave the clamp behind. The universal strap mount adjusts between 20-40mm to fit on nearly any bar or stem and was designed to be easy to install, even in complete darkness. The Ding comes with a spare silicon strap so you’re not left in the dark if yours happens to break.The Ding’s forward beam is projected by two LED’s, and maxes out at 400 lumens. The lenses are an angled cut-off type to reduce forward glare, and are designed to eliminate hot spots. The downward beam projects at up to 150 lumens, and illuminates an area 10′ wide and 5′ deep centered around the rider.A single button controls the Ding by scrolling through the light’s five different modes. The largest battery possible was used to provide good burn times, and although it should run for several years the battery is actually replaceable. The Ding charges by USB in 5 hours, and the battery’s charge port is protected from the elements by a rubber insert on the light holster. See the graphic below for the various modes and run times.The Ding has been tested for off-road trail riding, and can take the abuse of rough terrain. The company tested with a rider who used two Ding lights, which would output 800 lumens. There are far brighter lights available, so I’d suggest pairing a Ding with a stronger helmet light for full speed night riding. For commuters however, the Ding is a brilliant concept.The Ding light comes in either all grey or with green, blue or orange colored front bezels. The retail price will eventually be $92 USD, but currently Kickstarter supporters can still buy in for $72. The Ding’s Kickstarter campaign is on until Sat. June 27th, and if successful the first shipments are expected to go out around October.dinglights.com.au While cycling lights have become much brighter in the past few years, urban riders are looking in a whole different direction when it comes to light innovation- sideways. Recently Bikerumor previewed the Hueray light-up grips which follow this principle, but the Ding goes a step further and projects a large beam of light on the ground around you. The idea was hatched after the Ding’s creator Des Burns was almost hit by a motorist, who said they didn’t see him even though his front and rear lights were on.The Ding light has typical forward lighting for the cyclists visibility, but a separate light also projects downwards in a rectangular shaped beam that covers both sides of the rider to make you much more visible to drivers. The Ding’s Kickstarter campaign is already in full swing, but still needs some funding to go into production. Check out the details of the Ding below the break…last_img read more

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