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How to end the injustice of the skewed university degree system

first_img Opinion John PenroseJohn Penrose is Conservative MP for Weston Super Mare. No one else could take them and, if you got an A grade in, for example, chemistry, it was worth more than an A grade in the same subject from any other exam board. whatsapp A City and Guilds qualification in plumbing is worth the same to a student or a potential employer, no matter which further education college you studied at. A particular grade at A-level or GCSE English is worth the same whether you went to school in Truro or Tadcaster.  Pretty soon, there would be league tables showing which university courses added the most value during the three years of study, and which ones added least. Students would beat a path to the doors of those with the best teaching, and avoid the worst like the plague. Poor performers would have to pull their socks up, and the good ones would have nothing to fear. City A.M.’s opinion pages are a place for thought-provoking views and debate. These views are not necessarily shared by City A.M. How to end the injustice of the skewed university degree system It would be hideously unfair. Etonians would have a huge, inbuilt advantage in everything, from getting into the best universities to applying for jobs. It wouldn’t matter how hard you worked, how clever you were, or how well you performed in your exams. If you didn’t go to Eton, your life chances simply wouldn’t be as good.  How can it be fair that older institutions with long-established reputations are automatically assumed to be better than new ones, whether their teaching and courses deserve it or not? Main image credit: Getty All those recurring stories about there not being enough clever working-class or ethnic minority students at posh old universities would vanish. This system holds the seeds of an answer across the board: if every university pledged to make qualifications from similar courses equal, so a 2:1 in English was worth the same no matter where students studied, it would be revolutionary. For every other serious qualification in the UK, the same grades in the same subjects mean the same things.  It would make Britain a far fairer place: a more socially-just, meritocratic, mobile society, where someone who works hard and succeeds has the same life chances whether their father is a duke or a doorman. And directly-comparable grades would give a jolt of adrenaline to Britain’s universities as well.  In other words, we’d be richer as well as happier, and it wouldn’t cost taxpayers a bean. How many other ideas can say that?center_img Students would feel the effects first. Anyone who fluffed their A-levels and didn’t get into their first choice of university would have a second chance; they could still fulfil their potential by getting an equally good qualification from somewhere else.  Share In today’s global knowledge economy, enabling everyone to make the most of their talents doesn’t just help people live more fulfilled lives. It fuels the engines of Britain’s wealth and growth too.  For the first time, everyone would be able to compare the A-level grades which students had when they arrived with the quality of degree they’d earned when they left.  LONDON, ENGLAND – JULY 15: Students stand in a fountain ahead of their graduation ceremony at the Royal Festival Hall on July 15, 2014 in London, England. Students of the London College of Fashion, Management and Science and Media and Communication attended their graduation ceremony at the Royal Festival Hall today. (Photo by Dan Kitwood/Getty Images) There are a few honourable exceptions, like medical subjects, which standardise their grades so a degree is worth the same from everywhere.  Even better, universities would have a much stronger incentive to find and admit students with undiscovered talents. Bright students who’d got poor grades because they were ill on exam day, or had problems at home, or came from a disadvantaged background, would be like gold dust for admissions staff looking to vault up the value-added rankings.  Wednesday 4 September 2019 4:07 am Thank goodness that sort of thing doesn’t happen today in the real world, right? But it does. Right here in modern Britain, universities are doing precisely that. Instead of Eton awarding special A-levels that no one else can match, Oxford and Cambridge do it for degrees instead. But a first in English from Oxford or Cambridge isn’t worth the same as one from most former polytechnics. Imagine a world where Eton awarded its own A-levels. whatsapp by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeDaily FunnyFemale Athlete Fails You Can’t Look Away FromDaily FunnyFinanceChatterViewers Had To Look Away When This Happened On Live TVFinanceChatterNoteableyJulia Robert’s Daughter Turns 16 And Looks Just Like Her MomNoteableyPast Factory4 Sisters Take The Same Picture For 40 Years. Don’t Cry When You See The Last One!Past Factoryzenherald.comDolly Finally Took Off Her Wig, Fans Gaspedzenherald.comMisterStoryWoman files for divorce after seeing this photoMisterStoryYourDailyLamaHe Used To Be Handsome In 80s Now It’s Hard To Look At HimYourDailyLamabonvoyaged.comThese Celebs Are Complete Jerks In Real Life.bonvoyaged.comPost Fun25 Worst Movies Ever, According To Rotten TomatoesPost Funlast_img read more

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Author Spotlight: Emma Forrest

first_imgBooksAuthor Spotlight: Emma ForrestIn her new memoir, the British novelist and screenwriter remembers the psychiatrist who saved her life and the “Gypsy Husband” who broke her heartBy Wendy Witherspoon – May 3, 2011832ShareEmailFacebookTwitterPinterestReddItEmma Forrest was a young journalist prodigy in the United Kingdom, penning stories for The Times and The Guardian as a teenager in the 1990s. But all was not well under the surface. She would write curse words on her skin under her school uniform and ride her bicycle to the Tate and cry at Millais’s painting, Ophelia. By the time Forrest was 22, she was living in New York and her eccentricities had turned to self-cutting and bulimia so severe she sometimes couldn’t leave her apartment. She finally stumbled, bleeding, into the office of a psychiatrist who treated her for years after a suicide attempt. “Dr. R” (as she calls him) died in 2008, and Forrest’s memoir, Your Voice in My Head (Other Press), is a beautifully-written eulogy for the doctor she credits with saving her life. The book also chronicles Forrest’s relationship with a movie star (whom she refers to as “Gypsy Husband,” but whose identity she will not confirm). Forrest, who currently lives in L.A., told us that the process of writing her memoir in her Laurel Canyon hideaway helped her to heal.“In writing this, I was literally closing a book on an era, and on certain people and on certain behavior patterns. So I’m now going back and talking about things that, just by putting them to page and trapping them within the spine of the book, [got] wiped out in a way that has been very good for me. “I’ve been incredibly productive in L.A. because not only do I not know how to drive, but I rented my home before I moved here without ever looking at it, and I didn’t understand that living at the top of Laurel Canyon would not be a smart thing for someone who doesn’t know how to drive. I was completely trapped, and that was why it was such an unbelievably productive year–I couldn’t really go anywhere. Also, Laurel Canyon is fairyland, and I felt like I was under a spell. There’s dark energy up there with the wacky lighting, and I found that quite useful with this moody piece. I think I was in the right place because if I had still been in New York, it really is the city that never sleeps, and there always would have been someone to talk to, there would have been somewhere to go. I really was trapped in this Laurel Canyon spell that was actually healthy for the writing process. It was very odd, I would look at my computer screen at the end of the day and I wouldn’t remember having written at all. It really did just appear up there.” Photograph by Seamus McGarvey TAGS2011Emma ForrestL.A. CultureMay 2011Previous articleWhere’s Chris 5/2/11Next articleBe Pretty In Pink TonightWendy Witherspoon RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHORFollow in Pee-wee Herman’s Footsteps Across L.A.What Defines a Successful Immigrant?The Undocumented Immigrants Who Are Redefining ‘American’last_img read more

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News / Same again, as Hapag-Lloyd racks up a $237m H1 loss ahead of CSAV takeover

first_img “Once again the announced freight rate increases could not be implemented,” said German ocean carrier Hapag-Lloyd today as it posted another set of disappointing results for its liner business.The line had failed to get general rate increases between Asia and Europe, totalling more than $3,000 per teu  this year, to stick.By the half-year stage, Hapag-Lloyd had increased its liftings by 6% over the first six months of 2013, to 2.87m teu, but turnover declined to €3.2bn from €3.4bn the year before, as average freight rates per teu fell by another 6.4% to $1,424 and, significantly, on Asia to Europe to $1,165 per teu from $1,287.The consequence was another net loss for the carrier of €173m [$237m] in the first half. In H1 2013,  the loss was €73m.So, despite the introduction of 10 economy-of-scale Hamburg Express-type 13,208teu ships – the last of which was received in April – Hapag-Lloyd is still its own worst enemy: conceding an average rate decline for the sake of increased throughput.Nevertheless, Hapag-Lloyd still continues to blame “persistently strong competition” for freight rates that it bemoaned were “significantly lower than expectations”.But on the positive side, the carrier expects to reduce its bunker consumption by 2% per teu over the full year thanks to the deployment of larger ships, and will no doubt hope that it is successful in implementing a surcharge for the use of low-sulphur fuel in the ECA regions of Europe and the US.However, with the takeover of CSAV’s loss-making container business expected by the final quarter of the year, Hapag-Lloyd is running out of time to get its own house in order before it takes another hit with the costs of the integration, which, it admitted, could be substantial.In fact, the merger costs have been estimated at $63m by the two lines involved, but they believe the resulting synergies will save the ‘new Hapag-Lloyd’ around $300m annually by 2016/2017.In the interim, Hapag-Lloyd’s debt has increased in the past six months to €3.04bn from €2.93bn at the end of 2013, including the delivery of three ULCS and the purchase of new containers.However, Hapag-Lloyd said it expected its liquidity to “remain adequate” for the remainder of the 2014 financial year.The below-par performance of Hapag-Lloyd prior to the integration of CSAV’s business makes it an especially worrying time for ex-Damco chief Rolf Habben-Jansen, who only took over as chief executive on July 1.Nonetheless, Hapag-Lloyd announced another round of GRIs this month and, through its membership of the G6 alliance, it will also void an Asia-Europe voyage in October, for “vessel maintenance”.This will only increase the high load factors currently enjoyed by carriers plying the route which are said to be enjoying the first real peak season since 2010. By Mike Wackett 12/08/2014last_img read more

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Dope Sick: A harrowing story of best friends, addiction — and a stealth killer

first_imgBy then, DJ’s father had thrown him out of his home. It was December and temperatures were falling below zero at night. Angela and DJ’s father, who were divorced, had no idea where their son was living. They worried he would die.They devised a plan to save him.They told the Swanton Police that DJ had stolen several items from their home, including a snowboard, two pairs of snow boots, a music mixer, and a microphone, Angela said. They let the police know DJ would be coming by his father’s house later to pick up clothes — and that he was driving with a suspended license. DJ’s arrestVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard ShortcutsEnabledDisabledPlay/PauseSPACEIncrease Volume↑Decrease Volume↓Seek Forward→Seek Backward←Captions On/OffcFullscreen/Exit FullscreenfMute/UnmutemSeek %0-9 facebook twitter Email Linkhttps://www.statnews.com/feature/opioid-crisis/dope-sick/?jwsource=clCopied EmbedCopiedLive00:0000:5000:50  Swanton Police recording of DJ Shanks’ arrest. The police were waiting on Dec. 13, 2013, when DJ rolled into town in his white Hyundai Sonata. They confirmed the suspended license and opened the trunk, where they found the snowboard and boots. They also discovered three clear plastic baggies in the car, one of which tested positive for traces of heroin. DJ was charged with possession of drugs, receiving stolen property, and driving with a suspended license.“We set our son up basically to be arrested,” Angela said.At least DJ was not freezing to death. At least he wasn’t overdosing. It was a relief. “And how sad is that?”An excerpt from DJ’s diary. Courtesy Angela ShanksChapter 3Feeling the devilThe arrest was a jolt for DJ.He spent his first few days out on bail sleeping on the floor of a house with other addicts he barely knew. He told his mother he was worried he would have to prostitute himself to stay there. He begged her to allow him to come home. She refused.Out of options, DJ checked himself into the Arrowhead Behavioral Health center near Toledo, in his second stab at rehab. He was admitted for only a week. Angela fought with her insurance company and the center to keep her son there longer.The best they could do, Angela said, was allow DJ to participate in a day program for an additional two weeks. During that time, she dropped DJ off in the morning and picked him up on her way home from her job at a local bank. She didn’t want him alone in her house. Reading from DJ’s diaryVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard ShortcutsEnabledDisabledPlay/PauseSPACEIncrease Volume↑Decrease Volume↓Seek Forward→Seek Backward←Captions On/OffcFullscreen/Exit FullscreenfMute/UnmutemSeek %0-9 facebook twitter Email Linkhttps://www.statnews.com/feature/opioid-crisis/dope-sick/?jwsource=clCopied EmbedCopiedLive00:0000:4400:44  DJ’s mother reads from his journal. “I’ve never been so happy in my life now that I am finally clean,” DJ wrote on a yellow legal pad while at Arrowhead. “I can now think straight, I have good goals set ahead for me. I want to get a good factory job and start making some real money.”“I really want to be done with this drug,” he continued. “I really hate this and what I was doing. I can’t believe that I stole from my own mother and father. I really wish I could go back in time and never start this thing. It has ruined my whole life right now.”DJ pleaded with himself, and offered himself encouragement. On one sheet of paper he wrote “I can do this” 49 times.“I cannot give up on this,” he wrote on another page. “I got this. I know that I can do this. I really can. I will use all the tools I can to stay on top of this nasty disease. DJ you can do this.”After Arrowhead, DJ was convicted of the drug charge and sent to jail on March 14, 2014. He was released eight months later, after successfully completing another drug treatment program.With DJ out of his life for nearly a year, Justin had also stopped using drugs. The tight restrictions placed on him by his grandmother kept him away from old temptations. His father was able to get him a job at the auto parts plant where several family members were employed. Justin worked the second shift as a laser technician, making parts for the Acura RDX. It was more money than he had ever made. He found a new girlfriend and was thinking about getting married.The Tim Hortons in Toledo where DJ worked. Sean Proctor for STATThe apartment complex where DJ and Justin lived in Toledo. Sean Proctor for STATWhen he was off drugs, Justin got a job at this auto parts plant. Sean Proctor for STAT“I just came back up,” Justin said. “I made a name for myself. I just got a truck. I got my family back.”DJ was released the week before Thanksgiving in 2014. He landed a job as a baker at the Tim Hortons and was making enough money to put some in savings. He, too, had a new girlfriend.“I thought he was good. I really did,” said Angela. “I thought … he was moving forward with his life. He was so happy.”A short while later, Angela walked into her house — and saw Justin. “Oh my God, what are you doing here?” Angela recalled saying. “Why are you here?”Justin tried to put Angela at ease. He said he was just checking in on DJ after not talking to him for months. “DJ is like my brother,” Justin told her. “I just wanted to come and see him.”DJ’s sister Julia knew better. She was a year younger than DJ and the two were close. She had helped get him the job at Tim Hortons, where she worked part-time. She had also introduced him to his new girlfriend. The reappearance of Justin rattled her. The friendship needed to endVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard ShortcutsEnabledDisabledPlay/PauseSPACEIncrease Volume↑Decrease Volume↓Seek Forward→Seek Backward←Captions On/OffcFullscreen/Exit FullscreenfMute/UnmutemSeek %0-9 facebook twitter Email Linkhttps://www.statnews.com/feature/opioid-crisis/dope-sick/?jwsource=clCopied EmbedCopiedLive00:0000:2300:23  DJ’s sister Julia worried about her brother’s friendship. “I could feel the devil,” Julia said. “You could feel that this was not supposed to happen … that these two needed to stop being friends.”Justin’s family shared those fears.“He knew not to go back to him, and he did,” said Justin’s grandmother, Marilyn Laycock. “You know they were inseparable. One looked out for the other no matter what you say or did.”Justin was using heroin again when he showed up at DJ’s house. Grief-stricken by another friend’s fatal overdose, he had relapsed about a month before DJ finished his jail term.“It went downhill from there,” he recalled. “This was the worst I’ve ever been in my entire life. Using, using, using, using.”He was found passed out in his truck during his shift at the auto parts plant and failed a drug test. Justin knew he needed help and agreed to go to Arrowhead, the treatment center where DJ had gone earlier that year. The facility initially refused to take him because a urine test didn’t turn up any drugs, Justin said. So he left, did heroin, and came back.He was discharged in less than a week. Justin’s father, Ron, was stunned. My son went to rehabVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard ShortcutsEnabledDisabledPlay/PauseSPACEIncrease Volume↑Decrease Volume↓Seek Forward→Seek Backward←Captions On/OffcFullscreen/Exit FullscreenfMute/UnmutemSeek %0-9 facebook twitter Email Linkhttps://www.statnews.com/feature/opioid-crisis/dope-sick/?jwsource=clCopied EmbedCopiedLive00:0000:2200:22  Justin’s father, Ron, talks about his son’s experience in rehab. “He’s calling, ‘Come and get me, they said I’m not bad enough,’” Ron said. “They should know better.” He said the message to addicts such as Justin is that “nobody cares, why should I?”Arrowhead’s chief executive declined to comment. The center did give Justin a prescription for Suboxone, a drug used to treat opioid addiction by suppressing symptoms of craving and withdrawal.Justin knew just what to do with it.There’s a black market for Suboxone. Some addicts who have developed high tolerances for heroin switch to Suboxone for a few weeks as a way to reduce their tolerance without getting dope sick. When they resume using heroin, the euphoric effect is heightened in what addicts describe as a “virgin high.”So as soon as he was out, Justin went to his drug dealer — and traded the Suboxone for heroin.His relapse was not unusual. Typically, 40 percent to 60 percent of drug addicts relapse in the first year after treatment. One study found the rate was even higher for opioid detoxification programs, with 91 percent of patients relapsing — more than half within a week of release. Some studies of newer medications used to treat opioid addiction have reported more promising results.Justin said DJ had already started using heroin again before they reunited around Thanksgiving. DJ was trying to use less than before. His job at Tim Hortons was going well, and he didn’t want his family or his girlfriend to know what he was up to.Macey Fruth was a high school senior from Ottawa Hills, a wealthy Toledo suburb that is home to the area’s professional and business elite. While Ottawa Hills is only 17 miles from Swanton, it was a foreign land to DJ.Despite their different backgrounds, the couple hit it off. Macey loved how DJ easily connected with and looked out for people. When they went sledding one day, DJ pulled his car over to help a stranger stuck in the snow.DJ and Macey on a ski trip shortly before he died. Lucas County Prosecutor’s OfficeThe couple went to a Christmas Eve church service with her family and took a ski trip to Michigan. Six days before he died, DJ updated his Facebook profile picture with a snapshot from that trip: Macey was kissing his cheek, and he was smiling.Behind the smiles, though, DJ was spinning out of control.Before dawn one February morning, Julia woke up her mother with alarming news: DJ had relapsed.A few days earlier, he had been admitted to a hospital with pneumonia-like symptoms, after Justin had put him in a tub of ice at a drug dealer’s house when DJ began to overdose.“He was embarrassed about it,” Macey said. “He didn’t want to talk to anyone about it. He got upset and was crying. He needed to show everyone he was doing better.”DJ’s family mobilized in an urgent attempt to save him. The first priority: making sure he was never alone with Justin.Macey would do her homework at a table at Tim Hortons during DJ’s shift, watching to be sure Justin didn’t come in. Angela would drop by DJ’s place unannounced. Julia reached out to DJ’s other friends, asking everyone to keep an eye on him.Angela called DJ’s probation officer in early February, pleading with him to come out and give her son a drug test. She desperately wanted DJ back in jail. It had been the only place that could keep him safe from heroin.Angela said the probation officer told her that if she was worried, she should take DJ to the hospital. “It was not the answer I was really looking for,” she said.The Fulton County Probation Department said it couldn’t comment on DJ’s case because parole records are not public.On Feb. 18, Angela found out that Justin was planning to stop by and visit her son. She sent DJ an anguished text.DJ was enraged, and texted his mother back.Angela persisted.DJ didn’t respond.He wasn’t scheduled to work at Tim Hortons on Feb. 19, but was called in for a short afternoon shift. Normally, Macey would have been there, doing her homework and watching for Justin. But on this day, she was attending an event at her father’s real estate company.She wanted to be at the restaurant instead. She knew DJ was in a bad way. He had just found out a friend’s little brother had died from an overdose. He also had told her he wanted to hang out with Justin that night, a signal to her that he was thinking of heroin.Macey wrote DJ a text message at 3:31 p.m.Two minutes later, DJ texted back.He was close to passing out, having already snorted the fatal doses of fentanyl delivered by Justin.Macey could sense something was wrong.After getting no response, she texted again 15 minutes later.DJ couldn’t reply. He was sprawled across the doughnut shop counter.DJ lay there for more than a half-hour after falling unconscious. A coworker noticed him after about four minutes. Twice, she came over to try to wake him before placing her hand on her headset and walking away toward the drive-thru window. She returned at one point, but only to walk around DJ’s limp body, open an oven door just above him, and put a tray inside. Two customers came through the side entrance, with a clear view of DJ behind a glass partition, and either failed to recognize something was wrong or decided not to do anything. Only then did the manager arrive and call 911. DJ passed out at Tim HortonsVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard ShortcutsEnabledDisabledPlay/PauseSPACEIncrease Volume↑Decrease Volume↓Seek Forward→Seek Backward←Captions On/OffcFullscreen/Exit FullscreenfMute/UnmutemSeek %0-9 facebook twitter Email Linkhttps://www.statnews.com/feature/opioid-crisis/dope-sick/?jwsource=clCopied EmbedCopiedLive00:0000:2700:27  DJ Shanks was passed out for more than a half-hour at his job at Tim Hortons before someone called for medical help. A detective investigating DJ’s death, Sgt. Brian Bortel, said later that the coworker’s delay in summoning help for DJ was likely costly. “He has a better chance of survival if she calls our fire department,” he said in an interview. The coworker told another investigator that she panicked.As word spread of DJ passing out at work, his family scrambled to the hospital.“It was just disbelief,” said Macey. “I’m looking at his gray dead body with blood all over his teeth, thinking, I just talked to you two hours ago. We were fine two hours ago.”Julia hugged her big brother goodbye and felt sticky doughnut glaze in his hair.“That’s just not how he wanted to go out,” she said.The family was overcome with despair. They had desperately tried to keep DJ alive. Nothing had worked. The grip of addictionVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard ShortcutsEnabledDisabledPlay/PauseSPACEIncrease Volume↑Decrease Volume↓Seek Forward→Seek Backward←Captions On/OffcFullscreen/Exit FullscreenfMute/UnmutemSeek %0-9 facebook twitter Email Linkhttps://www.statnews.com/feature/opioid-crisis/dope-sick/?jwsource=clCopied EmbedCopiedLive00:0000:1800:18  DJ’s sister on addiction. “I want to sit here and give people a good message about my brother,” said Julia. “But, at the same time, I don’t know what to say to help them. I don’t. What can you do besides praying to God that you won’t have that itch tomorrow?”Justin, meanwhile, had no idea what had happened to his friend.He was waiting for DJ down the street from Tim Hortons, at the Knights Inn. The hotel is hard by Interstate 475 and offers rooms by the week. Weeds spring from cracks in the parking lot asphalt. The rooms are bare, with hooks where pictures once hung. As he waited, he continued to inject what he believed was heroin with a young woman he grew up with, a former standout athlete in high school.Justin thought DJ would finish work at around 4 p.m. At seven seconds past 4, he started calling his friend. No response. He texted him.Shortly before 5, he messaged DJ again.An hour and a half later, he called DJ. The manager at Tim Hortons answered DJ’s phone. He wanted to know who was calling. “The police want to talk to you.”Volume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard ShortcutsEnabledDisabledPlay/PauseSPACEIncrease Volume↑Decrease Volume↓Seek Forward→Seek Backward←Captions On/OffcFullscreen/Exit FullscreenfMute/UnmutemSeek %0-9 facebook twitter Email Linkhttps://www.statnews.com/feature/opioid-crisis/dope-sick/?jwsource=clCopied EmbedCopiedLive00:0000:4100:41  Chapter 1Helping a friendTOLEDO, Ohio — DJ Shanks was early into his afternoon shift as a baker at the Tim Hortons doughnut shop when the craving, and the dread, began. He called the one person he knew would help. Fast.Justin Laycock and DJ had met on their first day of kindergarten in nearby Swanton. Now in their early 20s, they remained best friends. “Do you have anything?” DJ asked Justin. “I’m sick.” Justin didn’t hesitate: “I got you, bud.”He didn’t need to ask what DJ needed. The childhood pals were consumed by heroin addiction, and Justin knew DJ was dope sick.advertisement Justin Laycock Special ReportDope Sick The judge was surprised by the harshness of the mandatory sentence as well. He saw in Justin someone more in need of help than punishment. He wasn’t a drug dealer, the judge explained later in an interview: “This wasn’t a crime of profit.”In the courtroom, he called Justin’s public defender and the prosecutor to the bench and proposed a novel alternative: He could craft a sentence that included less jail time and the treatment Justin was seeking for his addiction — but Justin would have to admit to a more serious charge of involuntary manslaughter. In the rigid world of mandatory drug sentences, the only way the judge would have discretion was if Justin admitted to killing his best friend.“I read the charge over and over and over in my head,” Justin said. “I am thinking to myself that if there’s anybody that looks at my record and sees that, they are going to know that somebody died.” His attorney advised against it, warning Justin that it would be difficult to find a job and start a new life with a manslaughter conviction. Only murder and child molestation are considered more serious felonies in Ohio.Justin’s family was mystified by the need to plead to the higher charge. “He didn’t murder him intentionally,” Justin’s grandmother said. “But in order to get help he had to take that charge, and I don’t think that was right at all.” Living with thisVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard ShortcutsEnabledDisabledPlay/PauseSPACEIncrease Volume↑Decrease Volume↓Seek Forward→Seek Backward←Captions On/OffcFullscreen/Exit FullscreenfMute/UnmutemSeek %0-9 facebook twitter Email Linkhttps://www.statnews.com/feature/opioid-crisis/dope-sick/?jwsource=clCopied EmbedCopiedLive00:0000:2200:22  DJ’s mother talks about Justin. Even members of DJ’s family acknowledged Justin acted without ill intent. “In no way shape or form do I think that Justin intentionally meant to hurt DJ,” Angela said. “I think Justin was simply DJ’s friend, DJ’s connection for what he wanted to get.”Justin ultimately decided the trade-off was worth it. He wanted treatment that would give him a legitimate chance to stay off drugs, even if it meant being labeled a killer. On April 21, he stood before the judge in an orange jumpsuit with a chain around his waist, attached to manacles for his hands and feet. His head was shaved. No family members came to support him.“I never knew it was fentanyl,” Justin told the judge. “It wasn’t my intention to kill my best friend at all. It was to help him out.”He begged for a chance to get treatment. “I am just asking if I can please just get help, your honor,” he said.The prosecutor said a young man was dead and that justice required Justin be punished with a prison term. DJ Shanks with childhood friends in January 2015, a month before he died. STAT DJ Shanks’s grave site at Toledo Memorial Park in Sylvania, Ohio. Sean Proctor for STAT“If you’re asking if it’s on my mind, it comes and goes,” he said. “Whenever I imagine myself doing it again, I imagine this place. I imagine my friends dying. I imagine myself overdosing, dying myself. I imagine going back to prison. You know, I mean none of this is worth it.” He talked about losing the girlfriend he wanted to marry, as well as the respect of his family, and the hurt he caused DJ’s family.“I am not willing to do it again,” he said.This is the tragedy of America’s opioid crisis: A young man goes to help his best friend and ends up helping to kill him. Their families, seeing what’s coming, can’t stop it. They turn to an overwhelmed health care system for treatment and instead mostly find indifference. In the end, they see jail, of all things, as their only hope.What will become of Justin? Despite an eight-year sentence hanging over his head, will he go back to drugs when he is released?The man who gave Justin one last chance didn’t hesitate to answer.“Yes,” Judge English said. “He will get out, maybe find a job. He will have money, and the people who do heroin that he hung around with will find him.”EpilogueDJ Shanks would have turned 23 on May 18 this year. His father, David Sr., declined to participate in this story.Justin Laycock turned 24 this past Saturday. He is scheduled to finish his jail term next April. He will then begin a six-month treatment program in another locked facility, with his release set for October 2017. His prison caseworker reported to Judge English in May that Justin has been cooperative with staff, attends AA meetings, and participates in other programs designed to teach life skills.Angela Shanks, DJ’s mother, is active in a local support group for families of victims of the opioid crisis. She is open to the idea of speaking with Justin one day.Macey Fruth, DJ’s girlfriend at the time of his death, will be a sophomore at Ohio University this fall. She spent this summer as a marketing intern in Florida. She goes home to Toledo infrequently.Ron Laycock, Justin’s father, has not communicated with his son in jail. Justin has written several letters to his father apologizing for his actions and expressing hope they can have a relationship in the future.Marilyn Laycock, Justin’s grandmother, remains in contact with her grandson. She said he is welcome to stay with her when he is released.Julia Shanks, DJ’s younger sister, suffered from depression and anxiety in the months after her brother’s death. She said she is doing much better today and recently started a job as a bank teller.DJ was one of 215 people to die from heroin- or fentanyl-related overdoses in the greater Toledo area in 2015. This year, based on cases in the first few months of 2016, the local medical examiner projects there will be even more deaths — at least 236.ContributorsStory by: David ArmstrongVideos by: Matthew OrrStory editor: Gideon GilPhoto editor: Alissa AmbroseArt direction: Alex HoganMotion graphics: Dom SmithWeb Development: Corey Taylor, Ryan DeBeasi, Jim ReeviorPage Design: Jen KeefeProject manager: Tony GuzmánCopy editor: Sarah MupoEditor’s note: Excerpts from DJ’s journal and text messages between DJ, Justin, and family members appear verbatim. They were not edited for spelling or grammar. A harrowing story of best friends, addiction — and a stealth killer By David Armstrong Aug. 2, 2016Videos by Matthew Orr center_img After DJ’s call, Justin phoned his heroin dealer and ordered an “80” — street slang for $80 worth of heroin, about a half-gram. A half-hour later, Justin walked up to the doughnut shop counter and slid a folded dollar bill toward his friend. DJ, wearing white baker’s pants and a Tim Hortons baseball cap, grabbed it and quickly walked to the back of the shop, where he snorted the powdery substance concealed inside the money. Justin, meanwhile, went to the bathroom and injected some of the drug, then returned and handed DJ another bill. DJ went into the bathroom to snort more of the powder. The day DJ diedVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard ShortcutsEnabledDisabledPlay/PauseSPACEIncrease Volume↑Decrease Volume↓Seek Forward→Seek Backward←Captions On/OffcFullscreen/Exit FullscreenfMute/UnmutemSeek %0-9 facebook twitter Email Linkhttps://www.statnews.com/feature/opioid-crisis/dope-sick/?jwsource=clCopied EmbedCopiedLive00:0000:1900:19  Justin Laycock describes buying drugs for his friend, DJ Shanks, who was working at Tim Hortons. Feeling good about taking care of his friend, Justin left the doughnut shop around 3:15 p.m. with plans to meet up with DJ later.DJ went back to work, stopping occasionally to wipe his eyes and face — an apparent side effect addicts call the itchies. After about 20 minutes, video from the shop’s surveillance system shows he became unsteady, bobbing back and forth while pouring glaze over a tray of doughnuts. Slowly, he began to slump forward, as if attached to a winch gently lowering him down. His head came to rest on a sheet of glaze. His body, bent over the counter at the waist, appeared lifeless.The Tim Hortons manager saw DJ as soon as he came through the shop’s side door. He took off his coat, dragged DJ to a back room, and called 911.“I just walked in and this guy was passed out,” the manager told the dispatcher. “I have no idea how long he’s been passed out, but he’s got blue lips, no pulse.”The manager performed CPR, but it was too late. DJ never regained consciousness. At 5:12 p.m. on Feb. 19, 2015, a doctor at the University of Toledo Medical Center pronounced David Andrew Shanks Jr. dead. He was 21. DJ Shanks passes out after snorting fentanylVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard ShortcutsEnabledDisabledPlay/PauseSPACEIncrease Volume↑Decrease Volume↓Seek Forward→Seek Backward←Captions On/OffcFullscreen/Exit FullscreenfMute/UnmutemSeek %0-9 facebook twitter Email Linkhttps://www.statnews.com/feature/opioid-crisis/dope-sick/?jwsource=clCopied EmbedCopiedLive00:0000:0900:09  A surveillance camera captures DJ Shanks as he passes out after snorting fentanyl. Toledo Police, in a report filed two weeks later, concluded there was “no indication of foul play in the immediate cause of Shanks death.”By all appearances, this was just another fatal heroin overdose — something that happens more than once an hour in a country awash in opioids. But it wasn’t heroin that killed DJ. It was fentanyl, an opioid manufactured in hidden laboratories to be up to 100 times more powerful than heroin. It’s what killed the musician Prince.Fentanyl is a stealth killer, often sold to clueless buyers as heroin, prescription pain pills or the anti-anxiety medication Xanax. DJ and Justin had no idea they were snorting and injecting it.The drug has flooded the marketplace as street dealers on up to major international cartels have discovered that it delivers heroin’s high at a fraction of the cost. This creates a paradox where the profit margin for drug sellers skyrockets as the street price for opioids drops.The result: Fentanyl is poised to become the catastrophic exclamation point to 20 years of escalating opioid addiction in the United States.STAT spent months interviewing friends and relatives of DJ, including hours of conversation with Justin, to piece together this report. DJ’s journals, written in the months before he died, offered insights into the turmoil he felt as he fought to get off drugs while forever chasing the next high. STAT also examined court files, police and medical examiner reports, phone records and text messages, and the surveillance camera recordings from Tim Hortons.Justin was shattered by DJ’s death. He blamed himself, and dulled the pain with heroin. His family feared he would overdose like his best friend. But when he least expected it, Justin would get one last chance at salvation.The subdivision in Swanton, Ohio, where DJ Shanks grew up. Sean Proctor for STATStorefronts in downtown Swanton. Sean Proctor for STATAs a boy, DJ lived in a subdivision in Swanton called Westpointe Estates, near the end of a cul de sac where neighborhood kids gathered to skateboard, ride bikes, or play games like Ghost in the Graveyard. Justin, who lived with his father and grandmother in a remote part of town, was a frequent visitor.About a dozen miles west of the Toledo city limits, Swanton is home to just under 4,000 people. On Main Street downtown, there is an Elks Lodge and a few insurance agents operating out of storefronts. Other buildings appear empty. The biggest event of the year is the Swanton Corn Festival, which was first held in 1908.Justin said he was attracted to DJ’s thirst for adventure, and they both considered themselves daredevils. When skateboarding or snowboarding, they would try to one-up each other with tricks. In school, it was a contest to see who could come up with the funniest joke or pull off the best prank.At Swanton High School, DJ, a catcher on the baseball team, was the rare athlete who also performed in the show choir and school drama productions. He played Bob Cratchit in “A Christmas Carol” and was part of the cast of “The Wizard of Oz.”Justin was a talented illustrator who could sketch intricate comic book covers that looked professional. He aspired to work in the video production industry and did on-air reports for his high school television station. He also ran on the cross country and track teams.Toward the end of sophomore year, the venturesome spirit that bonded DJ and Justin resulted in a fateful decision. The boys had tried cigarettes before, mostly out of adolescent curiosity. On this day, they were at a friend’s house and noticed smoke with a different odor. It was marijuana. The boys tried it and were quickly buzzed. Trying marijuana for the first timeVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard ShortcutsEnabledDisabledPlay/PauseSPACEIncrease Volume↑Decrease Volume↓Seek Forward→Seek Backward←Captions On/OffcFullscreen/Exit FullscreenfMute/UnmutemSeek %0-9 facebook twitter Email Linkhttps://www.statnews.com/feature/opioid-crisis/dope-sick/?jwsource=clCopied EmbedCopiedLive00:0000:2000:20  “I felt more laid-back, carefree,” said Justin of that first experience with drugs, “just like everything was kind of pushed off to the side.”DJ, in a journal he kept in a drawer next to his bed, wrote that he started smoking pot at 15 because “it was the cool thing to do, all the cool kids were doing it. So I felt like I needed to. … Big mistake.”The two smoked more marijuana the next day, and within a few months they were smoking daily. It became a ritual before they went outside and tried stunts on their skateboards. The drug emboldened them to try riskier moves.DJ’s grades, which had been average, plummeted to D’s and F’s. He stopped playing sports and performing.“I would skip school with my buddies to get high,” DJ wrote. “It was the life I was having soo much fun, not knowing I was going down a terrible path.”When he did go to school, DJ was getting in trouble. He had always been an extrovert, the class clown. He delighted in the attention and in making people laugh. But his behavior was more reckless now. He was given long suspensions, once for starting a massive food fight, and another time for writing insults about an administrator on a school wall. In his senior year, having fallen hopelessly behind, he left school.He worked to get his GED and found a job at a pizzeria, but not being in school or playing sports left him ample time to experiment with drugs. He became a heavy user of Percocet, one of the most commonly prescribed opioid pain pills. It was an escalation that worried his family. He seemed to need the drug.Justin’s behavior also changed after he started regularly smoking pot. He would become loud when high. He woke up one morning with mustard all over his face, having no memory of making a sandwich the day before.Justin transferred to a vocational high school a half-hour away for his junior year, to enroll in a digital video production program. He transferred to another high school the next year, when his family moved to a new town about 20 minutes west of Swanton.By then, he wasn’t seeing much of DJ, who had moved to Toledo with his mother. But he made new friends. And they introduced him to Percocet.Soon, Justin was taking the pain pills between classes. He remembers being high during a broadcasting class and going on air to anchor the school news report.“I’m on screen and I’m feeling good,” he said.Despite his drug use, Justin managed to graduate high school on time and moved into an apartment in Toledo in early 2013.He and DJ found each other a short time later. A mutual friend visiting Justin’s apartment told him DJ was living just around the corner. Justin left immediately to find DJ’s house and knocked on the door. DJ was surprised and delighted to see Justin on his front step.“It was a connection right away,” Justin said. “I mean, it was good. He started coming over every day, hanging out.”The friends picked up where they had left off — doing drugs every chance they could.Justin (left) made this photo, with DJ, his Facebook cover image in April 2013. via FacebookChapter 2‘Kissed by Jesus’DJ’s mother kept a silver serving platter in their house for special occasions. In July 2013, DJ and Justin decided to use it for a memorable moment of their own — the first time they would use heroin together.The gleaming platter was the perfect surface for chopping the drug into fine lines. As they leaned over and snorted the powder, Justin recalled, their faces reflected back at them.Justin was leery of heroin — he’d refused several requests from DJ that they do it together. He had heard that it grabs hold of you and doesn’t let go. He had seen homeless addicts in Toledo, strung out on the drug, and didn’t want to end up like them.But this time, he gave in. They had been smoking synthetic marijuana, called K2, which gave them a more intense buzz than regular pot, but they were out. He needed to get high.The next day, the friends woke up with the same thought: We need more heroin. Falling in love with heroinVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard ShortcutsEnabledDisabledPlay/PauseSPACEIncrease Volume↑Decrease Volume↓Seek Forward→Seek Backward←Captions On/OffcFullscreen/Exit FullscreenfMute/UnmutemSeek %0-9 facebook twitter Email Linkhttps://www.statnews.com/feature/opioid-crisis/dope-sick/?jwsource=clCopied EmbedCopiedLive00:0000:2000:20  “I absolutely fell in love with it,” Justin said. When he was high on heroin, all of the problems with his family and the shame he felt from his drug use washed away.“People say you literally have been kissed by Jesus,” he said. “It’s like escaping reality.”DJ had first used heroin more than a year earlier, and he was despondent as he fell under its spell again.“I couldn’t believe that I went back to this stupid drug,” DJ later wrote in his journal. “I hated myself soo much. But I kept getting high, and so did my best friend Justin.”The two were off on a months-long binge.Everything else became subservient to the need for a daily fix. Family, girlfriends, jobs — none of them mattered.Both were unemployed, and any money they had was going toward the drugs and alcohol. They weren’t paying rent for the apartment they now shared. They weren’t even buying food.When DJ’s mom, Angela, showed up at their apartment one day, she discovered the kitchen cabinets and refrigerator were empty. She drove to a supermarket and returned with cans of beef stew and other groceries.“They were so thankful,” Angela said. “Made me feel like a million dollars.”Angela had a soft spot for Justin. He was introverted and shy, and didn’t make friends as easily as DJ. Tall and slightly built, Justin appeared younger than he was. Whenever Angela was around, he was polite and courteous. When DJ’s mother met JustinVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard ShortcutsEnabledDisabledPlay/PauseSPACEIncrease Volume↑Decrease Volume↓Seek Forward→Seek Backward←Captions On/OffcFullscreen/Exit FullscreenfMute/UnmutemSeek %0-9 facebook twitter Email Linkhttps://www.statnews.com/feature/opioid-crisis/dope-sick/?jwsource=clCopied EmbedCopiedLive00:0000:2200:22  “I would have never in a million years pegged him for a kid that would get in trouble,” she said.So when the two were evicted from their apartment, Angela let them move into her place and helped them get jobs at a landscaping company. It was good money — some weeks they earned as much as $800 each. Eventually, every cent went to purchase heroin and marijuana. They soon lost their jobs.“My mom knew that we were on drugs and she was very worried,” DJ wrote in his journal. But her concern had no impact, DJ wrote, as he was “sucked in deep.”Angela had been down this road before with DJ.He told his mother he started on heroin around the beginning of 2012, when he was having difficulty getting Percocet. At one point, desperate for the painkillers, DJ intensely questioned his ill grandmother about her pain medications. She worried DJ might try to steal her pills.Then he discovered heroin could fill the void.DJ’s path is a well-traveled one: Four out of five new heroin addicts in the United States started by using prescription painkillers, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The shift to heroin has occurred as prescription pain medications like Percocet and OxyContin have become harder to find and more expensive on the street because of tighter controls on prescribing, as well as the development of abuse-deterrent versions of the drugs.A photo of DJ from his girlfriend Macey Fruth’s photo album. Courtesy Macey FruthDJ tried many times to break his addiction.His first attempt failed. A Toledo treatment center was reluctant to accept him because no drugs were detected in his urine, Angela said. DJ was baffled. He was smoking marijuana and using heroin. The detox center finally agreed to take him, but just for three or four days. It did nothing to curb his desire to get high.Soon he had moved from snorting heroin to injecting it for a quicker and more powerful high.“I started shooting it up, and this was terrible,” he wrote. “About 2 weeks after I started shooting, I died for the first time. My heart stopped. My friend had to rush me to the hospital, and they had to stab me in my heart with adrenaline to bring me back to life. To most people that would have taught them a lesson and make them want to quit. But I loved it. I was playing on the edge of life and death. I was in a whirlpool of emotions.”To support their habits, Justin and DJ pawned the Wii game consoles and an iPod of DJ’s younger siblings. They stole Angela’s camera.Angela kicked them out of her basement. Justin moved in with his grandmother, and DJ went to live with his father. They were back in Swanton — and little changed. One day, DJ’s father called Justin to confront him about the pair stealing items from his house. Justin was playing the card game Rummy with his grandmother, and she overheard the conversation. She knew Justin was doing drugs and wasn’t going to put up with it. If he wanted to stay at her house, he was to have no more contact with DJ. She took Justin’s phone and broke it. If he was going anywhere, he had to clear it with her.“She put me on house arrest,” Justin said.Justin with his grandmother, Marilyn Laycock. via Facebook My grandson is on drugsVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard ShortcutsEnabledDisabledPlay/PauseSPACEIncrease Volume↑Decrease Volume↓Seek Forward→Seek Backward←Captions On/OffcFullscreen/Exit FullscreenfMute/UnmutemSeek %0-9 facebook twitter Email Linkhttps://www.statnews.com/feature/opioid-crisis/dope-sick/?jwsource=clCopied EmbedCopiedLive00:0000:2300:23  “It wasn’t my intention to kill my best friend at all. It was to help him out.” Many heroin addicts don’t fear death. Dope sickness is another matter. When the body doesn’t get the heroin it lusts for, it retaliates with brutal force: vomiting, diarrhea, profuse sweating, intense cramping, paralyzing anxiety. Addicts will do whatever they can to avoid it — stealing, lying, or pimping themselves to get heroin. Justin once took his grandmother’s debit card. DJ had pawned his little sister’s video game console.Two ordinary kids from Middle America, DJ and Justin were caught up in the most pressing public health crisis of the day — a wave of opioid addiction that’s killing nearly 30,000 Americans a year. But their story comes with a terrifying twist.Their descent began with marijuana use in high school, then escalated to prescription painkiller abuse and heroin. It would end with something even more wicked.advertisement The judge said that he struggled with the decision but that the punishment had to include jail time because a life was lost. He sentenced Justin to a year in jail — half the mandatory minimum sentence he faced under the original drug charge. More importantly, he ordered that the jail term be followed by six months of treatment in a locked facility. When Justin finishes treatment, he will be required to wear an electronic monitor for six months, undergo drug tests, and attend 12-step meetings.The judge told Justin that he was giving him “a chance for treatment so that you can make the life you took worth something.” He warned that if Justin used drugs again, he would impose an eight-year prison sentence. He then wished Justin good luck.DJ’s family, and even some of Justin’s, were hoping he would get a longer jail term. The more time he is forced to go without heroin and other drugs, the more likely he is to break his addiction, they said.“It would have been nice to see it be longer,” said Angela, who saw her own son struggle to get off drugs. She figured if Justin received a sentence of seven years or so, that “maybe that will be long enough for him where he’ll have a chance. And it will get him where he needs to be. And he’s going to be alive.”Justin said he is focused on redemption, starting with repairing his relationships with his grandmother, father, and sisters. During an interview at the Corrections Center of Northwest Ohio a month after his sentencing, he said he thinks often of DJ. “He’s on my mind all the time,” Justin said. “He’s in my dreams.”He acknowledged he also thinks of heroin. Staying off drugsVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard ShortcutsEnabledDisabledPlay/PauseSPACEIncrease Volume↑Decrease Volume↓Seek Forward→Seek Backward←Captions On/OffcFullscreen/Exit FullscreenfMute/UnmutemSeek %0-9 facebook twitter Email Linkhttps://www.statnews.com/feature/opioid-crisis/dope-sick/?jwsource=clCopied EmbedCopiedLive00:0000:2200:22  Justin talks about staying off drugs. Justin injected drugs at this Knights Inn while waiting for DJ. Sean Proctor for STAT“I said, ‘This is Justin,’ and he says, ‘Justin who?’”“Laycock, his best friend,” Justin replied. “Is DJ there?”“Hold on,” the manager said. “I think the police want to talk to you.”Justin hung up.Assuming DJ had been caught with the drugs, Justin continued getting high.Julia, meanwhile, was quickly putting together the last moments of her brother’s life. She found out Justin had been at Tim Hortons that afternoon and correctly assumed it was to bring her brother drugs. Later in the evening, she started sending Justin messages.“My phone blows up,” Justin said. “I mean notification, notification, notification … and I am thinking to myself, what is going on.”Julia had sent him a series of Snapchat videos. He hit play: “You killed my brother. You’re a killer. You’re a murderer.”Justin was stunned. “I didn’t believe it,” he said. Justin in a visitors room at the Corrections Center of Northwest Ohio. Chapter 4An offer of redemptionDJ was buried beneath a temporary stone marker engraved with a baseball bat and a ball and inscribed with the words “Fun Loving Free Spirit.” Justin didn’t attend the funeral — his best friend’s family made clear he wasn’t welcome.Justin retreated to his grandmother’s house in Swanton, where he numbed himself with heroin to escape the pain of DJ’s death, and his role in it.He began stealing again from his family, pawning his father’s laptop and making off with his grandmother’s debit card to withdraw $150 for a day’s worth of heroin.It was “the lowest I’ve ever been in my entire life,” Justin said. His grandmother, after all, had helped him get off drugs for a while and taken him in when no one else would.Now, as DJ’s parents had done two years before, Justin’s grandmother turned to the law as a last resort. She called the police, who came and arrested Justin. “Get him out of here.”Volume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard ShortcutsEnabledDisabledPlay/PauseSPACEIncrease Volume↑Decrease Volume↓Seek Forward→Seek Backward←Captions On/OffcFullscreen/Exit FullscreenfMute/UnmutemSeek %0-9 facebook twitter Email Linkhttps://www.statnews.com/feature/opioid-crisis/dope-sick/?jwsource=clCopied EmbedCopiedLive00:0000:2800:28  After he was hauled away to jail, she found a note Justin left behind. “I’ll be watching over you all … til we meet again,” he wrote. “I love you all and I’ll miss you all.” Was Justin contemplating death? His family was unsure.“Any day I expected to lift up the phone and (hear) Justin overdosed or he got killed or whatever,” his grandmother said.The withdrawal from heroin while locked up was punishing. Justin defecated on himself. He sweated profusely. He couldn’t eat or sleep. He would sit in the shower for hours, hardly able to move. Still, all he could think about was doing heroin again.Justin was released on bail after two weeks and went to stay with a friend. He never unpacked his bag. Only hours after leaving jail, he removed an ankle monitor with tree limb cutters and stole a truck parked in his friend’s driveway. He drove straight to his dealer. After a four-day binge, he was out of money and the police were looking for him.He sent his family a group message apologizing for the pain he had caused and telling them he didn’t expect to live through the night. They begged him to turn himself in and let him know they loved him. His dad told him he was still young and had a chance to turn his life around. The outpouring surprised Justin. “How do you love somebody like me?”Volume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard ShortcutsEnabledDisabledPlay/PauseSPACEIncrease Volume↑Decrease Volume↓Seek Forward→Seek Backward←Captions On/OffcFullscreen/Exit FullscreenfMute/UnmutemSeek %0-9 facebook twitter Email Linkhttps://www.statnews.com/feature/opioid-crisis/dope-sick/?jwsource=clCopied EmbedCopiedLive00:0000:1200:12  “I mean, how do you love someone like me when I don’t even love myself?” he said.Just after midnight on April 19, in the middle of a residential street on the south side of Toledo, Justin walked toward a police cruiser with his arms in the air and surrendered.While Justin unraveled in the weeks after DJ’s death, Lucas County chief toxicologist Robert Forney and his staff meticulously screened DJ’s blood for drugs. Forney’s team didn’t find any heroin.What they did discover was a lethal dose of fentanyl.Forney has been on the job for 40 years. His lab does testing for 21 counties in Ohio and Michigan and has chronicled the rise of drug overdose deaths, which have now surpassed auto accident fatalities nationally. He started testing for fentanyl in 2014, when there were 13 fentanyl-related deaths. By the next year, the number was 66. It’s still growing.In no state is the fentanyl crisis more dire than in Ohio, where officials last year requested emergency assistance from the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In 2014, there were 502 fatal fentanyl-related overdoses in the state, a 500 percent increase from 2013. The victims tended to be younger, single white males, according to the CDC’s review. But the drug’s reach is long. A third of the victims were women, and the ages of those who died ranged from 17 to 71.Natalia Bronshtein/STATThe most terrifying aspect of the rise in fentanyl is that many victims, like DJ, have no idea they are using it. In the Sacramento, Calif., area earlier this year, 12 people died after taking counterfeit Norco pills, a common prescription painkiller, that contained fentanyl. In Florida, nine people died from counterfeit Xanax pills containing fentanyl.And in Akron, Ohio, police have identified an even more potent version of fentanyl that is being cut into heroin. Called carfentanil, it is the main suspect in 296 overdoses and 23 deaths since July 5, said Lt. Rick Edwards, a police spokesman. Carfentanil is used to sedate elephants and other large animals — to confirm what it was, detectives obtained a sample of the drug from the Cleveland Zoo.Calling it an “unprecedented threat,” the US Drug Enforcement Administration warned last month of an “expansion of the fentanyl market” that “will likely result in more opioid-dependent individuals, overdoses, and deaths.”Although it is legally prescribed for pain sufferers, such as those with cancer, almost all of the street-level fentanyl is illicitly produced in places such as China. A kilogram of fentanyl purchased from a lab in China for $3,000 to $5,000 can generate $1.5 million in revenue on the street, according to the DEA. That is about 20 times the return for a similar amount of heroin. The reason is the potency of fentanyl: It can be mixed with cutting agents in low doses to stretch the supply.Forney doesn’t know why DJ died and Justin survived, or whether DJ would have lived if he used heroin instead of fentanyl. There was alcohol in DJ’s blood, the equivalent of two and a half beers, which could have exacerbated his distress. And everyone’s tolerance level for opioids is different. Justin on fentanylVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard ShortcutsEnabledDisabledPlay/PauseSPACEIncrease Volume↑Decrease Volume↓Seek Forward→Seek Backward←Captions On/OffcFullscreen/Exit FullscreenfMute/UnmutemSeek %0-9 facebook twitter Email Linkhttps://www.statnews.com/feature/opioid-crisis/dope-sick/?jwsource=clCopied EmbedCopiedLive00:0000:1400:14  On Nov. 19, 2015, exactly nine months after DJ’s death, Justin was indicted and charged with one felony count of corrupting another with drugs. Toledo Police activated the dormant case after obtaining the Tim Hortons surveillance tape and the toxicology results. The charge against Justin came amid a nationwide push by prosecutors to punish those supplying fatal doses of fentanyl.Those charged have mostly been street-level dealers rather than major players in drug rings. In the case of DJ’s death, the dealer who drove to Tim Hortons to deliver the fatal dose was never charged. Toledo Police said they were unable to positively identify the dealer — a man in his 20s Justin knew as BG.Justin decided early on not to fight the charge. He admitted to detectives that he bought the drugs that DJ used just before he died.He was brought in to Lucas County Common Pleas Court Judge Ian English’s courtroom on March 17 to plead no contest — admitting that the allegations in the complaint against him were true. A prosecutor for 13 years, English had been a judge for a year and was known as a critic of harsh sentences for substance abusers. Justin hoped for leniency.Instead, he learned the charge carried a mandatory sentence of at least two years in prison and a maximum of eight. “I was devastated,” Justin said. Moreover, under the charge, the judge could not require that he get drug treatment while locked up.Justin listens during his sentencing by Judge Ian English at Lucas County Common Pleas Court in Toledo. Laura Mcdermott for STAT Sending Justin to prisonVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard ShortcutsEnabledDisabledPlay/PauseSPACEIncrease Volume↑Decrease Volume↓Seek Forward→Seek Backward←Captions On/OffcFullscreen/Exit FullscreenfMute/UnmutemSeek %0-9 facebook twitter Email Linkhttps://www.statnews.com/feature/opioid-crisis/dope-sick/?jwsource=clCopied EmbedCopiedLive00:0000:4500:45  Judge English discusses Justin’s case. Tags addictionfentanylopioidslast_img read more

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Luxury Villa Construction Booming

first_img There are signs that North Korea is running into serious difficulties with its corn harvest SHARE News By Kim Tae Hong – 2010.10.26 7:02pm US dollar and Chinese reminbi plummet against North Korean won once again Luxury Villa Construction Booming RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR [imText1]An unusual level of remodeling and reconstruction of official buildings and special villas is going on across North Korea, according to sources. One such source inside North Korea reported today that after demolishing the No. 15 Official Residence, located in vicinity of Kim Jong Il’s current office in Pyongyang, the authorities began construction of a new building in July, a claim which has been confirmed by satellite images. The No. 15 Official Residence was where Ko Young Hee, Kim Jong Eun’s mother, used to live. The location is linked to Kim Jong Il’s office and other official buildings by underground tunnels fitted with an electronic train. When Kim Jong Eun was a child, he also lived there. However, the source said he believes that the prime real estate may be undergoing a change of use.The source also reported that in December, 2009, Kim Jong Eun ordered the destruction of another special villa in Kyungsung, North Hamkyung Province, a place famous for hot springs, and the building of a new conference hall and villa with imported construction materials in its place. Approximately ten kilometers of road and rail construction has also been going on so that the area can be reached more conveniently, the source added. According to the source, around 1,200 soldiers have been mobilized alongside residents of Chongjin and Hoiryeong for the work. In addition, each household in the area has had to provide ten buckets of rocks for construction and pay 500 won for their delivery. Regarding this work, North Korea Reform Radio reported in July, “During construction of Kim Jong Eun’s special villa in Kyungsung, the authorities diverted the flow of a stream flowing through Haonpo-ri in Kyungsung, burying farms and angering residents.” Reconstruction of another villa and conference hall at the coastal Songdowon Resort in Wonsan, Kangwon Province is also ongoing. This construction is reportedly a gift for Kim Jong Il on the orders of Kim Jong Eun. The construction consists of two large, circular buildings. One of them has a lot of separate rooms, while the other has just one big hall, according to rumors. [imText2]Therefore, the source assumed that the finished building might be a similar to Kim Jong Il’s Seoho Villa, the No. 72 Villa in Nakwon, South Hamkyung, which is rumored to have one room extending 100m below the ground. A South Korean architect estimates that the construction of the three facilities and railroad will cost a total of around $180 million dollars, an amount which, according to the current international market price of corn, $300/ton, is enough to buy 600,000 tons of corn, enough to feed 2.3 million North Koreans for two months. According to documents the South Korean military and intelligence authorities provided for submission to a hearing of the Diplomacy, Commerce and Unification Committee of the National Assembly by lawmaker Yoon Sang Hyun, there are 33 luxurious villas in beautiful mountainous areas and along the coasts of North Korea. Since 2008, 13 out of 33 sites have been under maintenance work, according to intelligence. There are also 28 stations for the exclusive use of Kim Jong Il across North Korea. In North Korea, in general, around two or three facilities are remodeled per year, but the current degree of widespread construction and remodeling suggests that Kim Jong Eun may be set to use the villas in the future. On this, an anonymous expert with a national policy institute suggested that it does not portend a scaling back of the Kim family ruling style. “Seeing Kim Jong Eun’s luxurious life pattern,” he said, “he seems set to follow his father’s conventional method of dictatorship.”[imText3][imText4]center_img AvatarKim Tae Hong News News North Korea Market Price Update: June 8, 2021 (Rice and USD Exchange Rate Only) NewsEconomy Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

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Por qué el Banco Central de Corea del Norte eliminó a…

first_imgNews Desde el día 1 de agosto , Corea del Norteha eliminado a Kim Il Sung de los billetes de 5000 won. De acuerdo a fuentesinternas en el país, los nuevos billetes muestran en el anverso la casa deMankyundae, lugar de nacimiento de Kim Il Sung, y en el reverso la Exposición Permanente de Amistad Internacional,en el monte Myohyang. Hastaentonces, cada vez que Corea del Norte sacaba un nuevo billete, siempre poníael retrato de Kim Il Sung en los billetes de gran valor nominal. Sin embargo,la imagen ha sido eliminada de los billetes de 5000 won, hecho que ha generadodiversas opiniones. Desdelos primeros días tras asumir el poder, Kim Jong Eun ha imitado los pasos de suabuelo, más que los de su propio padre, Kim Jong Il: el modo de caminar,vestuario y corte de cabello, incluso la forma de aplaudir. Ha invocado lanostalgia de los norcoreanos por Kim Il Sung para compensar por su falta deexperiencia como líder. Por este motivo, la remoción de la imagen del “GranLíder” es un hecho inaudito. Kim Jong Eun ya no necesita estar a la sombra deKim Il Sung y puede gobernar por derecho propio, ahora que ha tomado el controldel Partido, del gobierno y de las fuerzas armadas. Esto ocurrió a fines delaño pasado, cuando Kim Jong Eun asumió estos poderes, tras la purga de su tíoJang Song Thaek, y la eliminación de miembros del antiguo gabinete.Porotro lado, a través de la remoción del retrato de Kim Il Sung se vería unintento propagandístico por mostrar una imagen nacional más abierta y ‘normal’de Corea del Norte, país aislado de la comunidad internacional. Unespecialista en asuntos norcoreanos ha comunicado a Daily NK que “Kim Jong Eunbusca alcanzar logros económicos, y al mismo tiempo dejar atrás la era de laindustria pesada de Kim Il Sung y Kim Jong Il, para concentrarse en laconstrucción de apartamentos en Changjeon St, en Munsu Water Park (un parqueacuático ubicado al este de Pyongyang) y en Masikryong Ski Resort (una estaciónde esquí localizada en la provincia Kangwon). Si bien él no puede negar oficialmentea Kim Il Sung, sí puede introducir algunos cambios para resaltar su imagen delíder”. Comoya se ha señalado, cada vez que Corea del Norte emite papel moneda, el billetede mayor valor incluye la imagen del Gran Líder. En relación con esto, se haobservado que existe la posibilidad de que un nuevo billete (de 10,000 won) seaemitido, el que llevaría el retrato de Kim Il Sung. Lamercantilización está aumentando en Corea del Norte y, con ello, la inflación.En este sentido, la emisión de un billete de valor más elevado parece ser unaopción inevitable. Con la caída del valor del papel moneda norcoreano, pareceque este es el único camino que le queda a Kim Jong Eun para dar resultadoseconómicos. Porotra parte, con respecto a las reacciones de la ciudadanía, la fuente alinterior del país comunicó que se vieron “reacciones de incredulidad” enalgunas personas sobre la posibilidad de que el billete de 10,000 won seapuesto en circulación. “ No creo que eso (la creación del nuevo billete) suceda”. Entire border patrol unit in North Hamgyong Province placed into quarantine following “paratyphoid” outbreak Por qué el Banco Central de Corea del Norte eliminó a Kim Il Sung de los billetes de 5 North Korea tries to accelerate building of walls and fences along border with China Facebook Twitter News There are signs that North Korea is running into serious difficulties with its corn harvest News SHARE By Kang Mi Jin – 2014.08.04 2:47pm RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR News Kang Mi JinKang Mi JinKang Mi Jin is a North Korean defector turned journalist who fled North Korea in 2009. She has a degree in economics and writes largely on marketization and economy-related issues for Daily NK. Questions about her articles can be directed to [email protected] Porúltimo (y como ya ha sido mencionado previamente), existiríaun afán propagandístico enel hecho de mostrar el lugar de nacimiento de Kim Il Sung en el anversodel nuevo billete. En efecto,  la casa deMankyundae es considerada como parada obligatoria para los visitantes en Coreadel Norte. Por otro lado, el reverso muestra la Exposición Permanente de Amistad Internacional,que reúne una colección de regalos otorgados a Kim Jong Il por visitantesextranjeros en el país. Este lugar también forma parte de la ruta turística enCorea del Norte, y es usado para promocionar la “vida modelo” de losnorcoreanos. last_img read more

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Applications for CARICOM Visa for CWC 2007 on the Rise

first_imgFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail Just days after the start of the Single Domestic Space on 1 February 2007, news has come that in just one month, 7000 applications were received for the Special CARICOM Visa which is required by nationals of some countries to visit 10 Caribbean countries as the world prepares to flock to the Region for the ICC Cricket World Cup (CWC) 2007.The visa is being issued by Caribbean immigration officials who are posted in major cites of London, England; New Delhi, India; Sydney, Australia; Toronto, Canada; Miami and New York in the United States. A satellite site s now in full operation at the Embassy of Trinidad and Tobago in Venezuela while others will soon be opened in Geneva, Switzerland; Beijing, China; Brussels, Belgium Berlin, Germany.Chair of the CARICOM Sub Committee on CWC security and Deputy Prime Minister of Barbados the Honourable Mia Mottley, informed that between January 1 and February 3rd 2007, 7 694 people had applied for visas. Of these, 5 735 were issued, with the remaining being processed.She also revealed that 17 visa applications have been denied. An extensive vetting process involving multiple checks against the CARICOM, United Nations and Interpol Watch lists as well as other intelligence gathering mechanisms ensures full screening of visa applicants…“The CARICOM Special Visa is not the normal rubber stamp visa. It is a secure visa,” said Ms Mottley.In order to meet the growing demand for the CARICOM Special Visa, the visa issuing sites have increased staff levels to handle the extra load.“To issue all these visas is a tremendous amount of work but we will continue to forge ahead,” she said, noting that their turnaround time for processing visas was three days, exclusive of courier or pick-up times,” said the Barbados Deputy Prime Minister.For details on the CARICOM Special Visa are available at www.caricomvisa.com or www.caricomimpacs.org or contact: Rose Blenman, Public Education Coordinator at [email protected] RelatedApplications for CARICOM Visa for CWC 2007 on the Rise RelatedApplications for CARICOM Visa for CWC 2007 on the Rise Advertisementscenter_img RelatedApplications for CARICOM Visa for CWC 2007 on the Rise Applications for CARICOM Visa for CWC 2007 on the Rise UncategorizedFebruary 8, 2007last_img read more

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New technology diagnoses sickle cell disease in record time

first_imgPublished: Oct. 15, 2020 • By Oksana Schuppan Above: Assistant Professor Xiaoyun Ding in the Biomedical Microfluidics Lab. Top: Acousto Thermal Shift Assay devices being assembled.Diseases of the blood, like sickle cell disease, have traditionally taken a full day, tedious lab work and expensive equipment to diagnose, but researchers at the University of Colorado Boulder and the University of Colorado Anschutz have developed a way to diagnose these conditions with greater sensitivity and precision in only one minute. Their technology is smaller than a quarter and requires only a small droplet of blood to assess protein interactions, dysfunction or mutations.Assistant Professor Xiaoyun Ding of the Paul M. Rady Department of Mechanical Engineering and Associate Professor Michael Stowell of the Department of Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology at CU Boulder, along with Associate Professor Angelo D’Alessandro of the Departments of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics and Medicine, Division of Hematology at CU Anschutz, co-authored a paper about the technology, now featured as the front cover of Small.  This project began when Ding realized that a technology developed in his lab could increase the speed of cell protein analysis performed by Stowell and his research group. As Stowell and D’Alessandro got involved, new applications emerged, including disease diagnosis.“In Africa, sickle cell disease is the cause of death in 5% of children under 5 years old for lack of early diagnosis,” said D’Alessandro. “This common, life‐threatening genetic disorder is most prevalent in poor regions of the world where newborn screening and diagnosis are rare.”Sickle cell disease affects hemoglobin, the molecule in red blood cells that delivers oxygen to cells throughout the body. In some areas of the world where malaria is endemic, variants of hemoglobin have evolved that can cause red blood cells to assume a crescent, or sickle, shape.“Almost all life activities involve proteins,” said Ding. “We thought if we could measure the protein thermal stability change, we could detect these diseases that affect protein stability.”Proteins have a specific solubility at a specific temperature. When one bonds to another or when the protein is mutated, the solubility changes. By measuring solubility at different temperatures, researchers can tell whether the protein has been mutating.A completed Acousto Thermal Shift Assay device shown next to a quarter for size comparison. This tiny lab-on-a-chip device can detect protein thermal stability change to diagnose sickle cell disease in one minute. Before recent developments, Stowell and his group, including researcher Kerri Ball, used Thermal Shift Assays to assess protein stability under varying conditions. Now, with the new technology, an Acousto Thermal Shift Assay, they can do the same but faster and with greater sensitivity.The ATSA utilizes high-amplitude sound waves, or ultrasound, to heat a protein sample while concentrating the proteins that don’t dissolve. Device components include a channel where the sample is deposited and two electrodes on each side to generate the wave that applies acoustic heating and concentration.For both a traditional TSA and ATSA, samples are collected and heated from 40 to 70 degrees Celsius. The traditional TSA measures how much of the protein has dissolved at set points over the course of the temperature increase, while the ATSA measures data continuously, recording how much of the protein has dissolved at every fraction of change in degrees Celsius.“Our method is seven to 34 times more sensitive,” said Ding. “The ATSA can distinguish the sickle cell protein from normal protein, while the traditional TSA method cannot.”Another benefit of the ATSA is cost reduction in terms of human labor and equipment.“The traditional methods for thermal profiling require specialized equipment such as calorimeters, polymerase chain reaction machines, and plate readers that require at least some technical expertise to operate,” said Ball. “These instruments are also not very portable, requiring samples to be transported to the instruments for analysis.”Ball said the ATSA requires only a power source, a microscope and a camera as simple as the one on your smart phone. Because the protein is concentrated, there is also no need to apply a florescent dye as is sometimes required to highlight protein changes in a traditional TSA.Ding said it is thanks to his collaborators, experts in biochemistry and hematology, that they now know the full impact of the technology.“This technique is an exciting development, because it represents a new and promising point-of-care platform for a rapid and highly sensitive diagnostic tool of sickle cell disease, and maybe for other hemoglobinopathies such as beta thalassemia too,” said D’Alessandro.By working with the engineering team, Ball said she and her research group created tools to accomplish their goals in new and better ways.Categories:BiomedicalMicro/NanoscaleOutreachTags:Xiaoyun Ding Share Share via FacebookShare via TwitterShare via LinkedInlast_img read more

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Afternoon Brief, June 5

first_imgHome Afternoon Brief Afternoon Brief, June 5Afternoon BriefAfternoon Brief, June 5By Editor – June 5, 2019 124 0 Linkedin Subscribe to the Afternoon Brief ReddIt Trending Story:New Privacy Law Puts California Wineries at a Competitive DisadvantageThe California Consumer Privacy Act is intended to help consumers safeguard their online identities and sensitive information. In e-commerce, where many digital platforms are funded through personalized ads, there should be greater transparency in how data is used, and greater protection of sensitive consumer information …Today’s News:Bill to Extend the Pierce’s Disease and Glassy-Winged Sharpshooter Board and Pierce’s Disease Control Program Heads to AssemblySenator Mike McGuire has introduced SB 449 to continue the PD/GWSS Board and PDCP for another five years, to provide continuing protection from Pierce’s disease (PD) and enable the industry to continue to support research and outreach on PD and other serious pests and diseases of winegrapes …Reuse of Treated Wastewater in Viticulture: Can It Be an Alternative Source of Nutrient-Rich Water?Water scarcity is a global problem, which leads to unprecedented pressure on water supply in arid and semi-arid regions. Treating wastewater is an alternative and valuable water resource, therefore its reuse for agricultural irrigation has been growing worldwide since the beginning of the 21st century …Trade War Is Hurting U.S. WineriesAmerican wine, beer and spirits producers are worried. Trade disputes between the U.S. and China, Mexico and the European Union are all impacting their businesses. And there’s no end in sight to the battles …California Association of Winegrape Growers Applauds Federal Funding for Smoke Exposure ResearchMisleading Move to Monetize Historic Legacy in the Famed Napa ValleyWine Crop in Napa County Tops $1B in 2018Washington State University Tri-Cities Partners with Spanish WinerySonoma Valley Vintners & Growers Alliance Hosts Sold-Out Crowd to Celebrate the Premium Wine Region with Iconic Industry LeadersSonoma County Department of Agriculture/Weights & Measures June UpdateCalifornia Association of Winegrape Growers Statement on Passing of $19.1 Billion Disaster Assistance Bill by House of RepresentativesUltimate Wine Challenge Announces 2019 Results 31 Exceptional Wines Are Awarded the Chairman’s Trophy, the Highest AccoladeBrown-Forman Invests Above the Line, Expects U.S. Growth to AccelerateConegliano Valdobbiadene Prosecco Superiore D.O.C.G. Announces Total Ban on the Use of GlyphosateDan Berger: A Look Back Over the Past 40 YearsBlogs:Selling to Different Generations: Silent Generation and Baby BoomersIs Riesling the World’s Most Under-Rated Premium Grape Variety?How Does the Concept of Sustainability Translate into Everyday Consumer Behaviour?Napa Sonoma Magazine: The Podcast!Sommelier Roundtable: Do You Need a Degree to Be a Sommelier?WineIndustry.Jobs:Craft Beer and Wine PackagingThe Can Van – San Francisco, CA, USATasting Room AssociateFlying Goat Cellars – Lompoc, California, USABilingual Vineyard Manage-Vineyard Development SupervisorClendenen Vineyard Management, LLC – Healdsburg, CA, USAMore Wine Industry Jobs…Feature Your Job Listing in the Afternoon BriefPeople:Gay Pride Month: Three Openly Gay Winemakers Tell Their StoriesChampion of Virginia Wine Industry David King DiesThe Art of Wine: A Conversation with Winemaker Mark FosterA Visit with Shauna Rosenblum of Rock Wall Wine CompanyKrista Scruggs Is Making the Wine of the FutureSupplier News:Create a Unique Look Tailored to Your BrandThe Digest: A Great Tool for Evaluating New MarketsChanging Sales Tax Nexus Rules: What They Mean for Online Sellers in 2019Using DTC Data to Drive Business DecisionsMore Supplier News…Vineyard & Winery:Old Stone Winery at Monte Rosso, Damaged in 2014, Headed for DemolitionPurple Wine + Spirits Adds Bourbon and Rye to Its Redwood Empire Portfolio of Premium American Craft WhiskeysScheid Family Wines Announces Winners of 2019 Scholarship ProgramMadrigal Family Winery’s Sausalito Tasting Salon & Gallery Presents Mike Moir’s “The Transcendental Power of Nature”Iron Horse Vineyards Wine Served During Trumps’ Elaborate Dinner for Prince Charles TAGSCaliforniaCalifornia Association of Winegrape GrowersClendenen Vineyard ManagementCoeur de Terre VineyardDan BergerDavid KingFlying Goat CellarsIron Horse VineyardKrista ScruggsMadrigal Family WineryMark FosterMaverick EnterprisesNexternalRieslingRock Wall Wine CompanyScheid Family WinesShauna RosenblumSpainThe Can VanTHE DIGEST OF WINE & SPIRITS LAWVirginiaWashingtonWineDirect Subscribe to the Afternoon BriefAdvertisement Advertisementcenter_img Twitter Facebook Share Email Pinterest Previous articleSonoma Valley Vintners & Growers Alliance Hosts Sold-Out Crowd to Celebrate the Premium Wine Region with Iconic Industry LeadersNext article2019 Sunset Magazine International Wine Competition Winners Announced Editorlast_img read more

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Township 7 Vineyards & Winery & BC Hospitality Foundation Collaborate on…

first_imgHome Industry News Releases Township 7 Vineyards & Winery & BC Hospitality Foundation Collaborate on Support,…Industry News ReleasesWine BusinessTownship 7 Vineyards & Winery & BC Hospitality Foundation Collaborate on Support, Ship & Sip CampaignBy Press Release – March 31, 2021 70 0 Pinterest AdvertisementB.C. Winery financially assists hospitality workers & establishes new wine industry education fund with the BCHFPENTICTON, BC – March 31, 2021 – Township 7 Vineyards & Winery is proud to deepen their relationship with the BC Hospitality Foundation (BCHF) this spring with the 2nd Annual Support, Ship & Sip campaign. The charity campaign raises funds for both hospitality workers in financial distress and for the new British Columbia Wine Industry Scholarship & Education (BC WISE) fund. The scholarship is designated for students in winemaking, viticulture and wine business administration. It was launched January 15, 2021, with the inaugural awards to be presented in May.“Unfortunately, the COVID-19 crisis has been going for over a year now and workers in the hospitality industry have faced tremendous economic challenges with all of the closures and restrictions placed on their businesses. Given Monday’s three-week closure announcement by the BC government, we hope charity efforts like ours and others in the wine community will help lighten their financial burdens, at least in some small way,” said Mike Raffan, Township 7 Vineyards & Winery General Manager. “When we approached the BCHF last summer with the idea for a new wine industry scholarship, we were thrilled with their wholehearted encouragement. They have been fantastic in launching BC WISE earlier this year and in working with us and others in the industry to promote it to prospective students. There is a significant human resources shortage of skilled workers in our industry, particularly in the Okanagan Valley. We believe that BC WISE will help foster the next generation of wine industry talent and hope it encourages people to pursue their career here in B.C. We hope our $10 donation for each online order with Support, Ship & Sip will be as successful this April as it was a year ago.”The BCHF’s Executive Director, Dana Harris, says, “Our charity is honoured that Township 7 has partnered with the BCHF to support the important work that we do to help individuals in the hospitality and tourism business that are struggling financially because of a health condition. The bonus of our promotion is this new BC WISE scholarship will also help bring qualified individuals into the winery workforce in BC.”To that end, Township 7 is building on last year’s successful campaign that saw the winery contribute $5,000 to the BCHF to assist hospitality workers in distress, and are relaunching their Support, Ship & Sip charity campaign. This April for every online order, Township 7 will donate $10 towards the BCHF with the goal of reaching $5,000.About Township 7 Vineyards & Winery:We have a singular focus. It’s only about quality wine! We believe premium winemaking starts in the vineyard. We carefully select specific sites throughout B.C. for their unique characteristics. Our fine wines reflect the special terroir of each vineyard and this is expressed in the bold flavours of the wine. Handcrafted to cellar, we hope you enjoy our robust reds and aromatic whites with loved ones. www.township7.comAdvertisement Share Linkedin TAGSBC Hospitality FoundationTownship 7 Vineyards & Winery ReddIt Email Facebook Previous articleNielsenIQ Beverage Alcohol Update for Week Ending March 20, 2021Next articleAfternoon Brief, March 31st Press Release Twitterlast_img read more

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