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Employer-sponsored pension assets climb in Q1

first_img Pension fund assets surged in the first quarter, amid both market gains and increasing net income, Statistics Canada reported Wednesday. “The market value of Canadian employer-sponsored pension funds totalled $1.6 trillion at the end of the first quarter, up 6.9% from the fourth quarter of 2014,” StatsCan said in a statement. Keywords Pensions Related news Canadian plan sponsors post positive quarter despite bond slump Federal budget fails to support needed pension reform, retiree group says James Langton center_img Budget 2021 revives tax issues from 2019 Share this article and your comments with peers on social media Over the same period, pension fund revenue grew 8.6% to $47.5 billion, StatsCan added, noting that the profits from the sale of securities rose 14.9%. Expenditures declined 6.5% in the first quarter, the government agency said, pushing net income up by 21.6% to $28.6 billion in the quarter. The value of Canadian pension funds’ foreign investments increased by 7.3% during the first quarter, outpacing the 5.0% gain in the value of equities, the 5.2% increase in the value of bond holdings, and the 5.6% increase in real estate assets. Bonds make up 35.1% of total assets, and 29.6% is in stocks. Foreign assets now and comprise 34.1% of total pension fund assets. More than 6.2 million Canadian workers are covered by employer-sponsored pensions, StatsCan said. Facebook LinkedIn Twitterlast_img read more

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Ontario budget to contain new spending

first_img Toronto home sales and home prices increased in April Ontario to deliver its second pandemic budget on March 24 Jessica Smith Cross Related news Ontario unlikely to balance budget by 2030: FAO Ontario’s Liberal government will release its first balanced budget in a decade on Thursday, with a host of new spending measures focused on pocketbook issues it hopes will resonate with voters heading into an election year. Premier Kathleen Wynne has in the past few years focused on big-picture plans for the province, such as tackling climate change, massive infrastructure spending and pension reform. But as her party and personal popularity have tanked in the polls, her message has shifted to that of fairness and everyday affordability. center_img She recently unveiled a “Fair Hydro Plan” and a “Fair Housing Plan” and in a speech Monday to announce details of a basic income pilot project, fairness was a theme she often returned to. “In this time of turmoil, we must work harder than ever to build and preserve a fair society,” she said. “We must make sure that hard work is rewarded with a decent pay cheque. We must make sure that the opportunities available to our people and especially our young people not only endure, but grow.” Read: A strong Ontario faces trade concerns By eliminating the deficit, Ontario is in a position to do those things, she said. “My plan builds on the action we have taken and the investments we have made over the past five years,” Wynne said. “It takes dead aim at the challenges that confront us in this new, uncertain world. It puts fairness at the heart of all we do and all we aspire to achieve for the people of Ontario.” Wynne said her approach is not to “cut back on public services, reduce taxes, slash regulations on corporations and let the results trickle down.” That wouldn’t help people who are struggling, Wynne said, adding that the three main elements to her plan are creating a “fair economy,” a “fair future for Ontario workers,” and education. Ontario’s finance minister has already announced that the budget will contain new spending to benefit seniors, students, parents, caregivers and patients. “I’m balancing the budget and I’m proud of that, but that’s not an end in itself,” Charles Sousa told The Canadian Press in a recent interview. “It’s what are we doing as a result of the balance.” Sousa has announced the budget will include a public transit tax credit for seniors 65 years and older. He has also promised a “booster shot” for health care, specifically funding to deal with the problem of overcrowded hospitals, which forces patients to be placed in hallways and other unconventional spaces. On Tuesday, ministers also announced $20 million in funding to increase the available respite services for unpaid caregivers who help friends and family members. The government is also launching an initiative to create 40,000 job training placements and internships over three years for students of all ages and recent graduates, as part of a $190-million Career Kick-Start Strategy. In a recent speech, Sousa highlighted investments the government has made in the innovation sector, saying more of that can be expected in the budget as the government embraces, “new, potentially disruptive technologies.” Sousa has said the budget will refer to the recent housing affordability measures the government announced. However, Sousa’s office said there is “no line in the budget” attributed to a newly announced 15% foreign buyer tax. It’s expected to be revenue neutral, as any money coming in should offset a decrease in revenue from land transfer tax. No further such housing measures will be unveiled in the budget, Sousa said Wednesday, but there will be measures on social housing for low-income residents. Additionally, $200 million will go toward creating 24,000 child care spaces and subsidies for families for about 60% of those spots — as part of the government’s promise last year to create 100,000 more licensed spaces. Cuts to hydro bills will add nearly $2 billion to the budget. An 8% rebate that took effect Jan. 1 is estimated to cost $1 billion a year, and more measures announced last month to help low-income and rural residents will cost taxpayers about $833 million a year. Even with a balanced budget this year, Ontario will still have debt of more than $300 billion. In 2016-17, interest on debt was the province’s fourth-largest spending area, with $11.4 billion of interest on approximately $317 billion of debt. The official opposition maintains the Liberals will only achieve “fake” balance in the budget as a political ploy ahead of the 2018 election. The Progressive Conservatives have even created a “Chef Charles Sousa” online caricature who talks about “cooking the books.” PC Leader Patrick Brown said he believes the Liberals can only balance the budget by dramatically cutting services or raising taxes, or by using accounting “tricks.” He’s specifically watching out for two such tricks: counting public pension surpluses as assets, against the advice of the province’s Auditor general, and counting revenue from the partial sale of Hydro One against the deficit, when the money is intended for a separate trust for infrastructure projects. “It’s Chef Sousa cooking the books to look good in an election year,” said Brown. Ontario’s NDP also sees politics in the budget. “The government’s had 14 years to address the problems that we’ve seen in this province, and they’re now scrambling at the last minute to save their own political skin, as opposed to really being concerned about the realities of life for Ontarians,” said Deputy Leader Jagmeet Singh. Facebook LinkedIn Twitter Keywords Ontario Share this article and your comments with peers on social medialast_img read more

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World Bank Provides $265 million Boost to Improve Earthquake Resilience and Energy Efficiency of Public Buildings

first_imgWorld Bank Provides $265 million Boost to Improve Earthquake Resilience and Energy Efficiency of Public Buildings The World Bank today approved a $265 million loan to Turkey to strengthen the safety of public buildings against the dangers of earthquakes while also improving energy efficiency to reduce energy bills and harmful carbon emissions.The Seismic Resilience and Energy Efficiency in Public Buildings Project will better insulate, strengthen or reconstruct more than 140 schools, dormitories, hospitals, and government buildings, directly benefiting about 26,000 people who live, work or use these buildings, including school children and employees. More broadly, the benefits will accrue to more than 6 million citizens reliant on the public services provided by the targeted buildings.The project will make an important contribution to training female engineers and, thereby, increasing the number of female engineers in key technical roles. Turkey has one of the highest gender gaps in the world in labor force participation and this gap is even more acute in technical and engineering sectors.Turkey is one of the most exposed countries in the world to earthquakes, with 76 earthquakes since 1900 resulting in approximately 90,000 deaths, affecting more than 7 million people and with direct losses exceeding US425 billion. Generally, buildings that were built before 2000 when modern construction codes for seismic resistance were introduced in Turkey, are considered to face a higher risk of serious damage in an earthquake. Tens of thousands of public buildings, constructed prior to 2000, that provide critical health, education and public services to citizens are in urgent need of structural strengthening or reconstruction.“The World Bank is pleased to support Turkey in its ambitious plans to make the country’s stock of buildings resilient to earthquake and a source of energy savings. While focused on public buildings, this project is an important step and its success is likely to spur similar transformations in the private sector, thus contributing to Turkey’s climate change mitigation and adaptation agenda,” said Auguste Kouame, World Bank Country Director for Turkey.Energy efficiency is also critical for Turkey to sustain its economic growth while meeting its commitments for climate change and environmental sustainability. With the energy sector accounting for over 70 percent of the country’s greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and global warming on the rise, thermal insulation and other green measures are critical for ensuring comfort of building occupants without increasing energy consumption. Investments in energy-efficient buildings can also reduce Turkey’s dependence on energy imports while reducing public expenditures on the energy costs of its more than 175,000 public building stock.“Buildings with the greatest vulnerability to disasters are also energy inefficient. By combining structural strengthening of buildings with energy efficiency and renewable energy measures, this project will yield significant cost efficiencies while fostering long-term resilience and sustainability,” noted Alanna Simpson, one of the World Bank Project Team Leaders.“The project will also result in much lower operating costs which the government can redeploy to make other improvements in the provision of public services,” added Jas Singh, the other World Bank Team Leader.The project’s main components include:Investments in central government buildings for seismic strengthening and energy efficiency improvement: This will involve structural strengthening to reduce earthquake risk and increase climate change adaptation interventions, which will include strengthening roofs to withstand wind and snow loads, and rainwater harvesting during times of water scarcity. Measures to improve energy efficiency will support increased functionality and comfort for the buildings’ occupants during extreme heat and cold events, which are expected to increase with climate change. Promotion of renewable energy sources, such as solar panels, will improve business continuity during disasters.Advanced technical assistance and capacity building: This involves the development of a long term and a significantly scaled-up investment program focused on increasing energy efficiency, structural strengthening, and multi-hazard resilience of public buildings. Activities undertaken and lessons learnt under this component will also have broader applicability to private and residential structures in the country.The World Bank is a leading partner in disaster risk management, urban development, and energy efficiency in Turkey. In recent years, the Bank has implemented the Istanbul Seismic Risk Mitigation and Emergency Preparedness Project; the Safe Schools Project financed by the Facility for Refugees in Turkey; the Disaster Risk Management in Schools Project; the Small and Medium Enterprises Energy Efficiency Project; and the Energy Efficiency in Public Buildings Project, among others. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:carbon emissions, climate change, efficiency, emergency preparedness, energy efficiency, Engineering, global warming, Government, Istanbul, public expenditure, renewable energy, resilience, Simpson, sustainability, Turkey, World Banklast_img read more

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County, city and Vancouver Housing Authority to open non-congregate shelter in Vancouver

first_imgCounty, city and Vancouver Housing Authority to open non-congregate shelter in VancouverPosted by ClarkCountyToday.comDate: Tuesday, December 8, 2020in: Newsshare 0 The goal is for a single operator to be selected and ready to provide services at a site beginning in late February or early MarchVANCOUVER – Clark County Community Services is partnering with the Vancouver Housing Authority (VHA) and the city of Vancouver to open a shelter for people who are unhoused. All three entities will contribute funds to the acquisition, and Clark County Community Services will oversee a contract with a yet-to-be determined non-profit service provider for the day-to-day operations.The VHA is working on acquiring a site.Clark County Community Services is partnering with the Vancouver Housing Authority and the city of Vancouver to open a shelter for people who are unhoused. File photoClark County Community Services is partnering with the Vancouver Housing Authority and the city of Vancouver to open a shelter for people who are unhoused. File photoClark County Community Services has issued a Request for Applications (RFA) to solicit possible operators of the new shelter. The RFA is open for applications until Jan. 1. A review committee composed of staff from the county, city and VHA will provide a recommendation for an operator in late January. The goal is for a single operator to be selected and ready to provide services at a site beginning in late February or early March.The shelter will operate 24-hours a day, seven-days a week, and it will be non-congregate meaning households utilizing the shelter will have their own room and restroom facilities, a critical feature during the current COVID-19 pandemic.Referrals to the shelter will be through the Coordinated Entry System utilized by the county as is required by the state. In addition to basic shelter services, it is expected that the shelter operator will also connect and engage residents with services and community supports that address their physical and mental wellness and result in positive and stable housing outcomes.The shelter will operate 24-hours a day, seven-days a week, and it will be non-congregate meaning households utilizing the shelter will have their own room and restroom facilities, a critical feature during the current COVID-19 pandemic. File photoThe shelter will operate 24-hours a day, seven-days a week, and it will be non-congregate meaning households utilizing the shelter will have their own room and restroom facilities, a critical feature during the current COVID-19 pandemic. File photo“Emergency shelter plays an important role in the homeless crisis response system by breaking the cycle of homelessness,” said Vanessa Gaston, Clark County Community Services Director. “It can be a transformational component to a system that tries to meet people’s basic needs while quickly moving them towards long-term stability.”Funding for shelter operations will be from a variety of state, federal and local sources which include state funds for new shelter beds, federal Emergency Solutions Grant shelter funds, and possibly local Mental Health funds.Once funds to operate the shelter are expended, which is anticipated after 2-3 years, VHA plans to convert the facility to affordable housing for the community.  Information provided by Clark Co. WA Communications.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textTags:Clark CountyLatestVancouvershare 0 Previous : How The Vancouver Clinic became Clark County’s leader in COVID-19 testing Next : Gov. Jay Inslee announces three-week extension of COVID-19 restrictionsAdvertisementThis is placeholder textlast_img read more

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CU-Boulder Professor Chosen To Lead International Communication Association

first_imgRobert T. Craig, professor and department chair of communication at the University of Colorado at Boulder, will become president-elect of the International Communication Association at its 52nd annual conference convening in Seoul, Korea, July 15-19. Craig will become president in 2003, after planning and serving as program chair of next year’s ICA conference in San Diego. “Communication in Borderlands” is his theme for the San Diego conference. In issuing a call for papers, Craig challenged ICA members to seek innovative ways in which communication can be used to bridge borders. He suggested five types of borderlands that can be addressed at the San Diego conference: geographical borderlands; cultural borderlands; personal borderlands that occur between individuals; technological borderlands, such as those created when there are technological limitations that cannot be crossed; and disciplinary borderlands, which can occur between professions or fields of study. Craig has published widely on various aspects of communication theory. His article, “Communication Theory as a Field,” published in Communication Theory in May 1999, won ICA’s first annual Best Article Award as well as the Golden Anniversary Monograph Award in 2000, presented by the National Communication Association. A CU-Boulder faculty member since 1990, Craig previously taught at Temple University, the University of Illinois at Chicago, Pennsylvania State University, and as a visiting professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the American University of Beirut. He received his doctorate from Michigan State University. The International Communication Association, which recently relocated to Washington, D.C., after 27 years in Austin, Texas, is a 52-year-old organization of more than 3,600 communication scholars and practitioners from about 60 countries worldwide. ICA promotes the study of communication theories, processes and skills and provides a forum for people in the field of to share research findings and innovations. For more information on the International Communication Association, please visit http://www.icahdq.org. Share Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail Published: July 16, 2002 last_img read more

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TIP SHEET: School violence prevention experts available to comment on Florida shooting

first_imgShare Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail Published: Feb. 15, 2018 Police in Broward County, Florida, on Wednesday afternoon responded to a school shooting with multiple fatalities at Stoneman Douglas High School. A suspect was placed in custody. Researchers with the Center for the Study and Prevention of Violence at the University of Colorado Boulder are available to discuss strategies for preventing school shootings. Stock photo of lockers.They can also discuss lessons learned from a study they published in the aftermath of the 2013 Arapahoe High School shooting in Colorado. The study identifies 32 prevention strategies.William Woodward, co-principal investigator of the Arapahoe High School study and director of training and technical assistance for the center. A video interview with Woodward is available [email protected] Kingston, director of the [email protected] more information or help arranging an interview, contact Lisa Marshall, CU Boulder media [email protected]last_img read more

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10 things to do this week: Breakfast for Dinner and more

first_img Published: May 3, 2021 This week brings the UMC Zen Zone, free fitness classes at The Rec, the Give and Go Donation Drive, several career development workshops, a voluntourism session and more.Monday, May 3Breakfast for Dinner: Free Food for Finals 4–7 p.m.  UMC, Alferd Packer Grill Are you stressed due to finals? Relax, take a break and re-energize with free breakfast! Sign up to receive a free breakfast burrito, and stop by the Alferd Packer Grill to pick it up. Remember to bring your Buff OneCard. Fuel for Finals May 3-4  10 a.m. to 2 p.m. VAC breezeway Fuel for finals by picking up free snacks and stay motivated with words of encouragement from CU Buff family members. Located outside of the Visual Arts Complex in the breezeway area.Volunteer for the Give and Go Donation Drive May 3–7  9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Various locations Come help sort and bag donations from students who are moving out of the residence halls. Through the Give and Go Donation Drive, you can help capture as many usable items that are in good and working condition so they can be donated to local nonprofits. View and sign up for volunteer shifts.UMC Zen Zone Through May 14  UMC open hours  UMC, first floor Take a break, relax or meditate in a comfy area to “zen out” while you prep for finals.Tuesday, May 4Free Finals Week: Free Fitness Classes Through May 5  Times vary  Rec Center Come take a break from finals at The Rec. Participate in all sorts of free fitness classes, from bouldering to yoga and even skating! Register to reserve your spot at fitness classes, and don’t forget to bring your Buff OneCard.Wednesday, May 5How to Find an Internship 3 p.m.  Virtual Learn the best tips and tricks on how to find an internship from Career Services. Get help with your résumé, learn how to describe your professional experience and more.Virtual Job Search Group for Alumni and New Grads Noon to 1 p.m. Virtual Did you recently graduate and are still looking for a job? Join other graduates and alumni to share job search tips, success stories and challenges. Learn about resources, best practices, employment trends and more from career coaches. Thursday, May 6How to Gain Experience and Build Skills without a Job 3–4 p.m. Virtual Are you looking for opportunities beyond traditional jobs and internships to build your résumé and skill set? Gaining experience isn’t all about internships and jobs. Learn about alternative experiences such as professional projects, freelance work, micro-internships, volunteering, job simulations, LinkedIn Learning, hackathons, entrepreneurship and more!Friday, May 7SKOServe: Voluntourism 2–3 p.m. Virtual What is voluntourism and who does it serve? What are the impacts of volunteers acting as tourists and tourists who volunteer? Join this session with the Volunteer Resource Center and gain a deeper understanding of voluntourism. Explore questions about its impact and develop skills for how to be effective if you choose to engage in voluntourism while traveling. Categories:Things to DoGetting InvolvedCampus Community Share Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-maillast_img read more

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Culture Watch – The Moth: Personal Stories Take the Stage

first_imgHomeOpinionColumnsCulture Watch – The Moth: Personal Stories Take the Stage Oct. 03, 2019 at 6:00 amColumnsCulture WatchFeaturedNewsCulture Watch – The Moth: Personal Stories Take the StageSarah A. Spitz2 years agobarbieBushra Al-FusairCarol SpencermattelSarah Austen JennessStory Slamthe broad stageThe MothYemeni women bike rideThe Moth comes to The Broad Stage. Photographed by Laura Partain If you listen to public radio or podcasts, you’re probably familiar with The Moth Radio Hour. On Friday, October 4, The Moth comes to the Broad Stage with five storytellers, ordinary people sharing extraordinary events that have affected or altered their lives in some way. Often funny, poignant or even painful, they reveal moments of truth in the life of someone you don’t know, but by the end of the night, you’ll feel you’ve shared an essential experience with them.I spoke with Sarah Austin Jenness, Executive Producer of The Moth.SS: What is The Moth?SAJ: I’ve been with The Moth for about 15 years, and I’ve seen it grow and evolve into a movement, creating community through personal stories.The Moth Radio Hour is the broadcast and podcast version of our live storytelling events. There are Story Slams, where people toss their name in the hat for a chance to tell a five-minute true-life story without notes, and the audience votes on their favorite. There’s the Main Stage, like we’re doing at The Broad Stage tomorrow night, often selected from stories we heard at Story Slams and have worked with the teller to develop.In this day and age, with everyone on their phones and not really connecting and being scared to even use the telephone, it’s nice to know many people in the world are choosing to connect through personal stories.VACILLATING BETWEEN ACTION AND REFLECTIONSS: How do you develop a story and storyteller?SAJ: For every Main Stage story, which makes up the bulk of what’s on the Moth Radio Hour, there’s anywhere from 10-20 hours of crafting and preparation ahead of time. You start with what you think the story is about, but when you’re working with a director and pull all the pieces out, you discover that the backbone of the story is something else entirely.We’re working with the storyteller to vacillate between the action and the reflection of the story. It’s not just “And then and then and then” or your friend saying, “You’ll never believe what happened to me.” Those can be fun and wild.But these stories involve some sort of decision, a change, or a shift in the storyteller that alters the course or direction of their lives. It doesn’t necessarily end with everything all wrapped up in a bow, because life doesn’t always work that wayThere are lots of phone calls between director and storyteller, we pull all the pieces out, put them all back together, we make sure it’s one story, not three braided together. We like to say life is long but your story has to be 10-12 minutes long. It’s not a speech, it’s not a monologue that you memorize, recite or act out. It’s like talking to 500 strangers as if they were a new friend of your best friend.People buy tickets to these shows because they know they’re going to hear terrific stories; there are no headliners, so they leave saying, “We liked the Voodoo Priestess the best,” or “The hot dog eating champion stole the show.”CLOSE TO HOMESS: What’s the theme this Friday at The Broad Stage?SAJ: It’s “Close to Home,” and among the storytellers are three people from LA.One storyteller, Bushra Al-Fusail from Yemen was part of a short community workshop we had in New York, who pitched a 1-minute version of her story after a three-hour introductory session, and we knew we had to work with her. During the Saudi siege of Yemen five years ago, she organized the very first Yemeni women’s bike ride. Without giving too much away, women in their abayas ride over the rubble of a highway that was just bombed two days before.And Carol Spencer [who wrote “Dressing Barbie” about her 35-year career at Mattel] was one of Barbie’s first fashion designers. She’s 86 and starts her story saying she broke up with her fiancée back in the early 50s when she realized his parents would be making the decisions for them as a couple and knew she didn’t want that.STORIES ARE LIKE FINGERPRINTSSS: What makes a successful pitch?SAJ: People from all over the world send pitches on our hotline. My advice is do not try to tell your life story in the pitch; pick one scene and really bring us into what was happening. Let us know why only you can tell this story, what specific details and feelings involved with this experience are unique to you. Stories are like fingerprints.Remember that these are stories that are most revealing about you, they’re not always the prettiest stories. It’s not called “The Butterfly,” it’s called “The Moth,” because moths are a little rough around the edges, as are the stories, on purpose.The Moth began on a porch on St. Simon’s Island in Georgia where the screens were ripped, and moths would circle around the light as friends shared stories from their lives, well into the night. That’s the feeling we try to convey.A CONVERSATION WITH JUST ONE PERSON TALKINGIn Los Angeles there are three story slams each month; information on dates and locations is at www.TheMoth.org, also home to the pitch line, where you can record your short pitch directly online.Sarah Austen Jenness concluded our conversation with these thoughts:“One person described The Moth as a conversation in which one person is talking. But if you listen to The Moth Radio Hour, you can hear the audience reacting, gasping, laughing; it’s remarkable how much the energy of the audience informs the story.“The Moth is a storytelling organization, but at any given time there are hundreds, thousands, even millions listening. The Moth is also inspiring people to practice the art of listening.”Sarah A. Spitz is an award-winning public radio producer, retired from KCRW, where she also produced arts stories for NPR. She writes features and reviews for various print and online publications.Tags :barbieBushra Al-FusairCarol SpencermattelSarah Austen JennessStory Slamthe broad stageThe MothYemeni women bike rideshare on Facebookshare on Twitteradd a commentMuir Woods Mural could be on the chopping blockArmed robber escapes on Montana AvenueYou Might Also LikeFeaturedNewsBobadilla rejects Santa Monica City Manager positionMatthew Hall7 hours agoColumnsOpinionYour Column HereBring Back Library ServicesGuest Author13 hours agoNewsCouncil picks new City ManagerBrennon Dixson18 hours agoFeaturedNewsProtesting parents and Snapchat remain in disagreement over child protection policiesClara Harter18 hours agoFeaturedNewsDowntown grocery to become mixed use developmenteditor18 hours agoNewsBruised but unbowed, meme stock investors are back for moreAssociated Press18 hours agolast_img read more

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Pentagon deploys troops to fuel COVID-19 vaccine drive

first_imgHomeNewsPentagon deploys troops to fuel COVID-19 vaccine drive Feb. 06, 2021 at 5:00 amNewsPentagon deploys troops to fuel COVID-19 vaccine driveGuest Author4 months agoCOVID-19vaccine The Pentagon will deploy more than 1,100 troops to five vaccination centers in what will be the first wave of increased military support for the White House campaign to get more Americans inoculated against COVID-19.President Joe Biden has called for setting up 100 mass vaccination centers around the country within a month. Two of the five new military teams will go to vaccination centers opening in California. Coronavirus senior adviser Andy Slavitt said military personnel will arrive at those locations in a little over a week. Three additional centers are expected to be announced soon.The Federal Emergency Management Agency has asked the Pentagon to supply as many as 10,000 service members to staff 100 centers. Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin approved the initial five teams, but the others will be approved in separate tranches as FEMA identifies the other site locations.The military deployment comes as the nation is in a race against a virus that is spawning mutations which may make it spread more easily and inflict deadlier disease.Only about 2% of Americans have received the required two-dose vaccination regimen that confers optimum protection with the Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna vaccines currently available. To reach widespread, or “herd” immunity, the U.S. must vaccinate 70% to 85% of its population, according to Dr. Anthony Fauci, the government’s top infectious disease expert.That would be roughly 230 million to 280 million people, compared to 6.9 million who are currently fully immunized with two shots.More help could be on the way soon. Johnson & Johnson announced this week it is seeking emergency use authorization from the Food and Drug Administration for its vaccine, which requires only one shot.Each of the Pentagon’s five military teams includes 222 personnel, including 80 who will give the vaccines, as well as nurses and other support staff. The teams would be able to provide about 6,000 shots a day.The five teams represent a growing use of the active duty military to a vaccination campaign that already involves nearly 100 National Guard teams in 29 states across the country. National Guard leaders told The Associated Press that they are now considering training additional Guard members to give shots, so that they can also expand vaccinations in more remote and rural portions of their states.Gen. Dan Hokanson, chief of the National Guard Bureau, said the Guard has the ability to field about 200 additional teams. Training other medical personnel to give the vaccination shots, he said, would potentially provide more.“If we reach the point where we’ve fully implemented all of our folks who can (give shots), then they’re looking at potential training opportunities if we’re going to need more than that,” said Hokanson. “We’re going to do everything to make a difference and meet whatever that need is.”The Pentagon has said that the FEMA teams could be a mix of active duty, National Guard and Reserves. But Hokanson and Maj. Gen. Jerry Fenwick, director of the Guard’s Office of the Joint Surgeon, said that at this point, the FEMA teams are more likely going to be filled largely by active duty troops. The Guard, they said, will probably be tapped by their governors for use in their own states. are more likely to be used in remote, rural locations.Guard leaders said the close to 100 mobile vaccination teams already active are delivering more than 50,000 shots a day.“As more vaccines come on line, there’s surely going to be more demand for vaccinators,” said Fenwick.Pentagon officials have made it clear that they are being careful about tapping National Guard and Reserves, because in many cases those service members are already working in medical jobs in their civilian lives at local hospitals and medical centers. Hokanson noted that while the Guard could staff as many as 600 vaccine teams, he has to cut that number about in half because of those types of civilian job restrictions.He said that so far Guard members are only operating in their own states, but could go to neighboring states if needed in the future, as long as they have enough teams.Biden has compared the campaign against COVID-19 to a war. Alongside the troop deployment, he also invoked a Cold War-era law called the Defense Production Act to help bolster manufacturing of vaccines, at-home COVID-19 testing kits and nitrile gloves used by health care workers and vaccinators. Referred to as the DPA, the law in essence allows the government to assign missions to private companies during national emergencies.Tim Manning, the White House’s COVID-19 supply coordinator, said Friday the administration was looking to help drugmaker Pfizer clear a bottleneck around fill-and-finish capabilities with vaccine production by giving the drugmaker first priority to access needed supplies.Manning said also said the government is investing in six manufacturers to develop at-home and point-of-care COVID-19 tests, with the goal of producing 60 million tests by the end of the summer. Earlier in the week, the White House announced a $230 million contract with Ellume, manufacturer of an at-home test approved by the Food and Drug Administration. No prescription is required for the over-the-counter test.“The country is well behind where we need to be in testing,” said Manning. Due to contract issues, he said he could not yet reveal the names of the companies.Another round of contracts will build capacity to produce surgical gloves in the U.S., including processing the raw materials for the gloves. There were widespread shortages at the start of the pandemic last year.Manning said the goal is to produce more than 1 billion nitrile gloves domestically by the end of this year.Tags :COVID-19vaccineshare on Facebookshare on Twitteradd a commentCrime WatchYour Column HereYou Might Also LikeFeaturedNewsBobadilla rejects Santa Monica City Manager positionMatthew Hall5 hours agoNewsCouncil picks new City ManagerBrennon Dixson16 hours agoFeaturedNewsProtesting parents and Snapchat remain in disagreement over child protection policiesClara Harter16 hours agoFeaturedNewsDowntown grocery to become mixed use developmenteditor16 hours agoNewsBruised but unbowed, meme stock investors are back for moreAssociated Press16 hours agoNewsWedding boom is on in the US as vendors scramble to keep upAssociated Press16 hours agolast_img read more

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SA Rugby looking long term with PRO14 move

first_img Posted in Columns, Dylan Jack, Pro14, Top headlines Post by Dylan Jack From the magazine: Jano Vermaak names his Perfect XVFormer Springbok, Bulls, Lions and Stormers scrumhalf Jano Vermaak names a team of the best he played alongside and against.SA Rugby MagUndoLife Exact BrazilGrace Jones Is Now 72 Years Old, This Is Her NowLife Exact Brazil|SponsoredSponsoredUndoCNAHow is life for Cambodian boy linguist after viral fame?CNA|SponsoredSponsoredUndoShop Bras Online | Search AdsTake a Look at These Bra and Panty SetsShop Bras Online | Search Ads|SponsoredSponsoredUndoAlphaCuteOprah’s New House Cost $90 Million, And This Is What It Looks LikeAlphaCute|SponsoredSponsoredUndoShop Bras Online | Search AdsBrilliant Bra and Panty Sets (take a look)Shop Bras Online | Search Ads|SponsoredSponsoredUndo ‘ GoGoPeak10 Most Beautiful Cities You Should Visit Once In Your LifetimeGoGoPeak|SponsoredSponsoredUndoWorld Cup-winning Bok quartet in Eddie Jones’ all-time XVSA Rugby MagUndoWatch: Kolbe makes Test players look amateur – Ugo MonyeSA Rugby MagUndoBuzzAura16 Cancer Causing Foods You Probably Eat Every DayBuzzAura|SponsoredSponsoredUndo PRO Rugby in May announced that it had received an investment from CVC Capital Partners to the tune of €140 million. CVC Capital has previously invested in sport through Formula 1, Premiership Rugby in England and MotoGP.While the South African franchises did not get a share of the investment, it is clear why SA Rugby would want to get involved in northern-hemisphere rugby if these are the numbers mentioned.The potential move to PRO Rugby could be just the first step in ensuring the survival of the South African rugby franchises. The next step would be to get the South African teams into Europe through either the Champions or Challenge Cup and then to get more regular Test matches against the Six Nations.As SA Rugby director of rugby Rassie Erasmus outlined in a media conference, there are also on-field benefits to such a move. Travelling will be far easier for players and coaches, which will make planning for the next game much easier.Concerns over not playing against New Zealand teams are legitimate, especially given the level we saw in Super Rugby Aotearoa, but the competence levels of the Irish and Scottish clubs, in particular, should not be underestimated. The likes of Leinster, Munster, Ulster, Connacht, Edinburgh and the Glasgow Warriors are full of top players, many of them Test-rugby players, who will certainly present the South African teams with a different challenge.This is not to say that SA Rugby should abandon ship on Sanzaar, and it is good to hear that the Springboks could continue playing against the All Blacks regularly through the Rugby Championship.ALSO READ: Sanzaar relationships at lowest ebbPhoto: Gallo Images ‘ ‘ Five one-cap Boks that could still represent South AfricaSA Rugby MagUndo The Pro14 trophy  234  36 Loans | Search AdsLooking for loan in Hong Kong? Find options hereLoans | Search Ads|SponsoredSponsoredUndocenter_img SumabisThis Is What Happens To Your Body If You Sleep With Socks OnSumabis|SponsoredSponsoredUndo ‘ SA Rugby looking long term with PRO14 move Published on September 30, 2020 ALSO READ: Domestic tournaments overhauled SA Rugby’s negotiations with PRO Rugby is the first step to securing its long-term financial future with a move to the northern hemisphere, writes DYLAN JACK.On Tuesday, one of the worst-kept secrets in South African rugby was officially confirmed when it was revealed the existing Super Rugby franchises are in line to make the transition into an expanded PRO Rugby competition.ALSO READ: Why SA Rugby is seeking northern-hemisphere futureThe decision was taken by the 13 voting member unions of the South African Rugby Union at a special general meeting to determine international participation and competition formats in a Covid-19-impacted rugby environment.The four teams voted to potentially transition were the existing Vodacom Super Rugby franchises – the Vodacom Bulls, Lions, Sharks and Stormers.Understandably, Cheetahs fans and stakeholders have been burnt by the decision especially as this is not the first time the Free State franchise has had to make way for the Super Rugby teams.However, when one looks at the bigger picture where SA Rugby needs to secure South African rugby’s long-term financial future, one can understand why the decision was made.It was just a couple of weeks ago that the Southern Kings were placed in their second liquidation in only seven years. This came after the third instance where the Kings franchise failed to honour its contractual obligation to pay players and staff members.Subsequently, 58 people from the Kings – 36 players and 22 staff – were left without a job just days before payday.In July – just three months after South Africa went into the Covid-19-enforced lockdown – the Valke also filed for liquidation, leaving their own players and staff in a difficult situation.This is the reality of the era SA Rugby is currently facing. Voluntary liquidations have become such a norm in South African rugby that people forget about the human impact of such a move.If we are being honest, the writing has been on the wall for both Super Rugby and the Currie Cup in its current format for some time. Both competitions have become rather stale through their constant format changes and simply don’t pull in the spectator interest that they used to. ‘ The Family Breeze餐桌上嘅敵人: 十五種最致命嘅食物The Family Breeze|SponsoredSponsoredUndo ‘last_img read more

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