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NASCAR TV schedule, April 9-15, 2018

first_imgWhat channels are NASCAR races on this week? We answer that and provide all the weekly NASCAR television listings here in the NASCAR TV schedule.Note: All times are ET.MORE: Get the NBC Sports App |  How to find FS1, FS2 | Get FOX Sports GO | How to find NBCSNMonday, April 95 p.m.: NASCAR America, NBCSN6 p.m.: NASCAR Race Hub, FS1Tuesday April 103:30 a.m.: Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series O’Reilly Auto Parts 500, FS1 (re-air)5 p.m.: NASCAR America, NBCSN6 p.m.: NASCAR Race Hub, FS1Wednesday, April 115 p.m.: NASCAR America, NBCSN6 p.m.: NASCAR Race Hub, FS1Thursday, April 125 p.m.: NASCAR America, NBCSN6 p.m.: NASCAR Race Hub, FS1Friday, April 13Noon: Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series opening practice, FS1 (Canada; TSN 3)1 p.m.: NASCAR Xfinity Series opening practice, FS1 (Canada: TSN GO)2 p.m.: NASCAR Race Hub Weekend Edition, FS13 p.m.: NASCAR Xfinity Series final practice, FS1 (Canada: TSN GO)4 p.m.: NASCAR Race Hub, Weekend Edition, FS14:30 p.m.: Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series qualifying, FS1 (Canada: TSN 3)Saturday, April 146 a.m.: Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series opening practice, FS1 (re-air)7 a.m.: Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series qualifying, FS1 (re-air)8:30 a.m.: Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series second practice, FS1 (Canada: TSN GO)9:30 a.m.: NASCAR Xfinity Series qualifying, FS1 (Canada: TSN GO)10:30 a.m.: NASCAR Race Hub, Weekend Edition, FS111 a.m.: Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series final practice, FS1 (Canada: TSN GO)Noon: NASCAR Race Hub, Weekend Edition, FS112:30 p.m.: NASCAR RaceDay, Xfinity Series, FS11 p.m.: NASCAR Xfinity Series Fitzgerald Glider Kits 300, FS1 (Canada: TSN 3, 5)3:30 p.m.: NASCAR Xfinity Series post show, FS1Sunday, April 153 a.m.: NASCAR Xfinity Series Fitzgerald Glider Kits 300, FS1 (re-air)11:30 a.m.: NASCAR RaceDay, FS112:30 p.m.: Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series pre-race, FOX1 p.m.: Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series Food City 500, FOX (Canada: TSN 1, 3, 4, 5)last_img read more

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Composter appeals $100K bill for unpaid sales tax

first_imgby Viola Gad August 12, 2013 vtdigger.org The owner of Vermont Compost Company in Montpelier was surprised when he received a bill for $100,000 in unpaid sales taxes a year ago.Vermont Compost Co. owner Karl Hammer held a news conference Monday at the state Department of Taxes. Hammer believes compost products should be exempt from state sales tax. Photo by Viola Gad/VTDiggerMonday, Karl Hammer, president of VCC, appealed the tax audit decision with a letter delivered in person at the state Department of Taxes. Members of the farming industry and a state representative joined Hammer, citing an inconsistency in taxing agricultural products during a brief news conference in front of the tax department.‘It does not make policy sense tax-wise, to treat compost differently than a Vermont tree or a bag of fertilizer,’said Rep. Will Stevens, I-Shoreham.This spring, Vermont Compost’s 208 commercial customers received letters in which Hammer explained that the company was being audited and that it might have to pay tax on sales made in 2009, 2010 and 2011.Many of his customers offered to pay the 6 percent tax retroactively, Hammer said, but it is VCC’s responsibility in the end.The invoice from the Department of Taxes is about $115,000, while the annual gross revenue of the company is around $1.5 million, Hammer said.If Hammer loses the appeal, he could go to court, but the state wins 95 percent of tax appeals, he said.‘We’re in business and hope to survive in business,’said Hammer after he delivered the appeal letter. ‘But we haven’t even talked about 2012, 2013 (unpaid taxes) yet.’There is no date set for payment of the invoice.Generally speaking, the tax department will work with companies to set up a payment plan if it doesn’t have the money, said Mary Peterson, commissioner of the Department of Taxes.The department doesn’t discuss specific cases and would not indicate whether other compost companies were audited for missed sales taxes. Companies are responsible for their taxes going three years back, Peterson said.The Department of Taxes cites a change of statute in 2007 that ruled that compost is not on the list of sales tax exemptions. According to Hammer, the law was put into effect in 2009.‘I’m certainly aware of it now,’Hammer said. ‘There’s an awful lot of government, and it’s hard to keep track of all of it even if you are sophisticated enough and have the resources.’VCC started charging sale tax to growers who are not able to present an exempt certificate after it received the audit notification in August of last year, Hammer said. The company has also taken written statements from growers who think it’s immoral to have a sales tax on compost, he said.Up until Hammer received the audit notification, he was under the impression that farmers who use 96 percent of their compost purchase for food production are exempt from paying sales tax.‘We have always said to people, ‘If you’re growing food, you don’t have to pay sales tax,’‘he said.Representatives from the farming industry have trouble understanding why compost is charged sales tax while other fertilizers used for growing food are not.‘The possibility of taxing compost while other agricultural inputs, including chemical fertilizer, are not taxed feels very much like conventional agriculture is being incentivized, whiled organic agriculture is being penalized,’said Rachel Schattman from Bella Farm, an organic certified farm that buys 20 yards of compost and potting soil from Vermont Compost Co. each year.Legislators and organic farmers are keen to change the current statute. Stevens is currently working on a bill, H.542, which was brought back for policy work. (http://www.leg.state.vt.us/docs/2014/bills/Intro/H-542.pdf(link is external)). The bill aims to make compost a non-taxable commodity for food growers.In addition to being a legislator, Stevens is a farmer and owner of the 88-acre Golden Russet Farms. Each year, he buys 400 yards of compost products from Hammer and he will have to pay him a total of $600 in sales tax for the 2009-2011 period.‘It will be one of my two priorities to get this bill past early next session,’Stevens said.last_img read more

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Solar panels donated by Sticks and Stuff to heat Lyndon State pool

first_imgLyndon State College has received a gift of 72 solar panels and associated heat pump equipment from Sticks and Stuff, the hardware and home supply store that recently purchased the Indoor Recreation of Orleans County (IROC) facility in Derby, Vermont. LSC plans to use the donated panels to heat the 25 meter swimming pool on campus. The panels will be mounted on the Rita Bole Gymnasium roof – – adjacent to the pool building – – sometime early next summer.’ Lyndon State College’s pool will be heated using solar panels donated by Sticks and Stuff. Left to right, front: Jeff Lamphere and Kris Bullock of Sticks and Stuff, LSC President Joe Bertolino. Back row: LSC Director of Physical Plant Thomas Archer, LSC Assistant Professor Ben Luce.The cost to purchase new solar powered pool heating equipment would be in the range of $100,000. According to Tom Archer, the director of LSC’s physical plant, ‘the cost to add additional support to the roof structure will be about $40,000. The cost to remove the panels from the IROC facility, transport and install the panels and associated equipment at LSC will be approximately another $45,000.’ Lyndon annually uses approximately 8,000 gallons of fuel to heat the pool; annual cost savings would be nearly $11,400. The 2-year-old panels have a projected life of 20 to 25 years, measure 7’ by 4’, and weigh about 104 pounds when empty.LSC President Joe Bertolino said ‘We are very excited to receive the donation of this solar hot water system and are deeply grateful to Jerry Belisle, Kris Bullock, and Jeff Lamphere at Sticks and Stuff for making this happen.’In addition to saving money on energy consumption, the green technology is of interest academically, especially for students in the college’s Sustainability Studies degree program. Ben Luce, assistant professor of natural science and physics notes, ‘We have been interested for years in the possibility of heating our athletic complex with solar hot water. This system is ideal. We plan to involve our students closely in both the installation and performance analysis of this system, which we anticipate will strongly advance our goals of making Lyndon State a leader in energy efficiency and renewable energy implementation and education.’The solar panels donated to Lyndon State College by Sticks and Stuff were previously installed at the IROC facility in Derby, Vermont.‘ ‘last_img read more

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SMSD committee to review Shawnee Mission North’s Indian mascot

first_imgAfter months of community efforts to change Shawnee Mission North’s Indian mascot, including an online petition that has roughly 3,300 signatures, the Shawnee Mission School District Board of Education this week announced its policy committee will review language from other districts regarding mascots.Back in July, a group of SM North community members — including alumni, parents, teachers and students — began a petition to change the Indian mascot by the school’s 100th anniversary in 2022. A counter-petition aimed at keeping the mascot was also launched and has more than 2,300 signatures.At that time, district leaders put off the issue, saying they needed to focus on managing reopening school during the COVID-19 pandemic and that they would revisit the mascot issue at a later date.At Monday’s regular board meeting, Shawnee Mission West area board member Laura Guy said she’s glad to see movement on the issue — and apologized for the delay.“Those who asked us to consider changing the mascot have waited a long time and have been very gracious in letting us deal with the emergency situation that’s been in front of us,” Guy said, referring to the pandemic, which continues to strain the district’s resources.“I, too, am very glad that the policy committee is going to be looking at this. I’m sorry that it took us as a district this long, I’m glad we’re finally addressing it,” she said.On Monday, the board heard from several people during public comments who urged movement on changing the mascot. The speakers included Lisa Patterson Kinsey, mother to two SM North graduates, who offered to lead fundraising efforts to help with the cost of changing a mascot.Carina White, a 2014 SM North graduate, said there aren’t “two equally reasonable sides” on the issue.On one side, she said, there is “continued implementation of actively oppressive stereotypes” and on the other there is “growth and better care for our fellow human beings.”Other alumni, like 2010 graduate Melissa Arroyo, spoke to their experiences both at SM North and after graduating.“I felt a huge sense of pride for being a ‘SMN Indian,’ and now, 10 years later, I am fully aware that I was complicit in the oppression and mockery of Native Americans and their culture,” Arroyo said.While no one at the meeting spoke in favor of keeping the mascot, a petition supporting the current mascot says, among other things, that “Cultural Appropriation is Cultural appreciation.”The counter-petition was written by 2012 North alumnus Emmitt Monslow, who identifies as Native American.“It’s discouraging to see these white, liberal women who are trying to cancel the mascot because they have some savior complex where they think they need to speak up for the Native American community,” Monslow told the Post in an interview earlier this year.The district’s policy committee meets once a month, including on Dec. 3.Sara Goodburn, SM North area board member who sits on the committee, said she anticipates there will need to be a study of other districts’ policies and that the committee might be able to propose language by the board’s regular meeting in January, 2021.last_img read more

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Women tend to be more sensitive to irksome behavior than men

first_imgEmail Pinterest Women may be friendlier than men, but that doesn’t mean they like putting up with jerks.A new study led by a Michigan State University psychology professor suggests women are more likely than men to get irked at irritating or boorish behavior exhibited by acquaintances, friends or partners.“Women generally are more sensitive to other people’s annoying behavior than men,” said MSU’s Christopher J. Hopwood, a researcher and practicing therapist. “They’re maybe more socially aware, on average, and so perhaps it’s easier for them to pick out things that are annoying than men are.” Share on Twitter Sharecenter_img LinkedIn Share on Facebook The study, based on a survey of 235 people, set out to evaluate whether women and men differ in their sensitivities to the aversive behavior of the people with whom they interact. The findings appear in the latest issue of the journal Personality and Individual Differences.While many studies have looked at differences between the sexes on individual behaviors (generally, the research suggests women are the warmer and more submissive sex, while men tend to be colder and more dominant), there has been less focus on these differences in social situations.The study examined a number of aversive behaviors such as being antagonistic, controlling and overly or inappropriately affectionate.The findings are compelling, the study notes, because of the cultural implications they have for understanding detrimental behavior that could lead to relationship problems.last_img read more

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Dutch officials approve publication of Fouchier’s H5N1 study

first_imgApr 27, 2012 (CIDRAP News) – The Dutch government has granted virologist Ron Fouchier, PhD, an export license that allows him to submit his much-debated H5N1 transmissibility paper to Science, according to a ScienceInsider report published today.”Now we can move on,” Fouchier told ScienceInsider.His report details how he and his colleagues developed an H5N1 virus capable of airborne spread among ferrets. Since the study was first described in general terms last September, it has been controversial because of concern that the findings could be exploited to unleash a virus that could spark a human pandemic.The Dutch government’s decision was made by Henk Bleker, minister for agriculture and foreign trade, and announced in a press release (in Dutch) today, according to ScienceInsider. It follows an Apr 23 meeting in The Hague at which government officials discussed the research with scientists and security experts.The announcement came exactly four weeks after the US National Science Advisory Board for Biosecurity (NSABB) reversed an earlier recommendation and, on a 12-6 vote, endorsed publication of Fouchier’s report in full. The US National Institutes of Health endorsed the board’s recommendation on Apr 20.According to ScienceInsider, the Dutch announcement states, “Minister Bleker has weighed all of the benefits and risks of publication of the avian influenza research, and has especially looked at the freedom of research and publication, health, and safety. He has also taken into consideration insights from national and international experts in the areas of security, health, and research; the positive advice of the U.S. National Science Advisory Board on Biosecurity to the US government about publication of the research; and the US government’s decision to follow that advice.”Fouchier had opposed the export-permit requirement and at one point vowed he would submit his manuscript without applying for one. But more recently he agreed to apply for the license, while protesting the need for it.The scientist said he was pleased but not surprised by the government decision and commented that it would have been “strange” if the government had ruled the other way in the wake of the NSABB’s recommendation and other developments, according to ScienceInsider.His revised manuscript will still need to go through peer review at Science, according to previous reports.When the NSABB endorsed full publication of Fouchier’s study, it also voted for full publication of a similar study led by Yoshihiro Kawaoka, DVM, of the University of Wisconsin. The vote on Kawaoka’s study, expected to be published in Nature, was unanimous, unlike the decision on Fouchier’s.See also: Apr 27 ScienceInsider storyApr 17 CIDRAP News story “Fouchier plans to flout Dutch export law, publish H5N1 study”last_img read more

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News Scan for Dec 31, 2013

first_imgTaiwan reports its 2nd H7N9 caseTaiwan has confirmed a second case of H7N9 avian flu, in an 86-year-old man who lives in Jiangsu province in mainland China, according to a news release today from Hong Kong’s Centre for Health Protection (CHP).The man traveled to Taiwan on Dec 17 and had symptoms that included loss of appetite and chest discomfort starting Dec 19. He sought aid at a Taiwan hospital on Dec 24, the CHP said. A story today from China’s Central News Agency (CNA) said he was placed on a ventilator that day.A clinical specimen was tested by Taiwan’s health authority and found positive today, the CHP said.Most of the man’s 25-person tour group has returned to the mainland, but two of his daughters have stayed with him, according to the CNA report. The daughters have had no symptoms, the story said.Taiwan announced its first H7N9 case, in a 53-year-old man who had traveled to mainland China, on Apr 24.Dec 31 CHP news release Dec 31 CNA story Apr 24 CIDRAP News story “Taiwan reports first H7N9 case outside of China” Multiple US states report increased flu activity, deathsInfluenza activity is markedly increasing in North Carolina, Oregon, Arkansas, and Texas, according to media reports, and three of those states are reporting deaths.In North Carolina, health officials recently confirmed the state’s eighth flu death and will soon add more that occurred last week to the tally, the Raleigh-based News Observer reported yesterday. And Duke University Health Systems in Durham was temporarily limiting visitors because of the high volume of flu cases, the story added.Elsewhere, 98 people are hospitalized in the Portland, Ore., area with influenza, up from about 60 a week ago, according to Oregon Public Broadcasting (OPB).In the South, Arkansas has now confirmed five flu deaths, including two in children, Little Rock–based KTHV reported yesterday. The Arkansas Department of Health has confirmed 78 flu cases so far this season.Texas continues to be the hardest-hit state. Dallas County health officials have confirmed three adult flu deaths and are investigating two more, The Dallas Morning News reported yesterday. Late last week a CBS/AP story noted that Texas is experiencing a spike in flu cases and Houston has confirmed 13 flu deaths so far.In addition, a child from northern Mississippi has become that state’s first flu death, according to the Jackson-based Clarion Ledger yesterday. All states are reporting that 2009 H1N1 is the dominant flu strain.Dec 30 News Observer story Dec 30 OPB report Dec 30 KTHV report Dec 30 Dallas Morning News article Dec 27 CBS/AP story Dec 30 Clarion Ledger articlelast_img read more

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Implementation Plan for the CSME 2017-2019

first_imgCARICOM/CSME: The Persisting Implementation QuestionCARICOM Day        On July 1, Guyana and possibly a few other Member States of the Caribbean Community (CARICOM) commemorated CARICOM Day marking the signing on July 4, 1973 of the Treaty of Chaguaramas creating the Caribbean Community and Common Market. It seems the day is usually marked on the first…July 4, 2019In “CARICOM”CSME in focus as CARICOM Heads of Government meet in Montego BayCARICOM leaders head to the scenic Montego Bay, Jamaica, for their Thirty-Ninth Regular Meeting. The Meeting will be held 4-6 July at the Montego Bay Convention Centre. As it was, more than two decades ago when Jamaica hosted the Eighteenth Meeting of the Conference in Montego Bay in 1997, the…July 3, 2018In “CARICOM”CARICOM Secretary-General addresses Trinidad and Tobago Manufacturers Association’s AGMWhile the CSME continues to be a work in progress, it is sufficiently advanced to be used more effectively by the private sector.  There has been significant progress in several specific ways.  There is free trade in goods and services, free movement of skills and capital, and the cross-border establishment…April 11, 2018In “General”Share this on WhatsApp Region must harmonise measures, digitise processes to… CDF, IRENA Collaborate to Boost Low-Carbon Investments in… The Caribbean Community (CARICOM) has taken steps to accelerate the use of the measures under the CARICOM Single Market and Economy (CSME). The Conference of Heads of Government in July 2017, approved the Implementation Plan for the CSME 2017-2019 which coincides with the CARICOM Strategic Plan (2015-2019). The Plan is a comprehensive document which details the level of implementation of measures called for by the Revised Treaty of Chaguaramas or decisions taken by Community Organs. The timeframes in the agreed Implementation Plan are in line with the time-frame envisioned for the Acceleration of the Implementation and Use of the CSME in the Community Strategic Plan 2015–2019, as follows – (i) Immediate to Short-term (up to six months); (ii) Medium-term (up to 1½ years); and (iii) Long-term (up to 2½ years). The Plan is under constant review by the Council for Trade and Economic Development (COTED) and Member States are required to submit regular updates on progress made as well as challenges faced in implementing their obligations under the Revised Treaty of Chaguaramas. Please see CSME Implementation Plan 16 Oct 2018 CSME Implementation Plan 16 Oct 2018 Share this:PrintTwitterFacebookLinkedInLike this:Like Loading… Oct 6, 2020center_img Related Posts Aug 17, 2020 CARICOM Formulating Energy Security Strategy Oct 1, 2020last_img read more

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HSBC enters Romania with €104m buy

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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