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Legislature rejects Walker’s call to act on nominees

first_imgCrime & Courts | Energy & Mining | Interior | Southwest | State GovernmentLegislature rejects Walker’s call to act on nomineesApril 27, 2017 by Andrew Kitchenman, KTOO and Alaska Public Media Share:Senate President Pete Kelly takes questions from reporters after the Legislature voted on Thursday to adjourn from a joint session. (Photo by Andrew Kitchenman/KTOO and Alaska Public Media)Gov. Bill Walker tried and failed to get lawmakers to vote on his nominees Thursday.Five minutes after starting a joint session, the Legislature voted along caucus lines, 32-26, to adjourn without holding a vote. Senate President Pete Kelly said he plans to hold votes on the nominees before the legislative session ends. The deadline to end the session is May 17.Kelly said the Legislature should focus on the budget and a plan to draw from the Permanent Fund to balance the budget. While some nominees have been controversial, Kelly denied that was a factor in the delay.“There’s nothing about this that has anything to do with any person,” Kelly said. “There’s no one that I know of with a target on their back. I think there’s some people who may have some difficulties. There’s no question about that. But none of this has anything to do with any of the nominees.”Kelly and other Republican lawmakers have raised questions about Attorney General Jahna Lindemuth, Alaska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission member Hollis French and Human Rights Commission member Drew Phoenix.They and another 100 nominees will continue to act in their positions until either a vote or the end of the session. If there’s no vote, all of the nominees must leave their positions.House Speaker Bryce Edgmon said the Legislature should act on the nominees and then move on to other business.“I was very disappointed that we couldn’t get that work done today, knowing the workload that lies before the Legislature,” Edgmon said.Walker issued a proclamation on Wednesday calling the Legislature into a joint session, after the Senate twice turned down the House’s invitation to meet.In a letter to Walker, Kelly called the proclamation “an unproductive distraction.”Of the legislators present at the session, every Senate majority and House minority member voted to adjourn, while every Senate minority and House majority member voted against adjournment.Share this story:last_img read more

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Can trauma be passed down through DNA? Researchers and Hoonah residents search for answers.

first_imgAlaska Native Arts & Culture | Community | Family | Health | Science & Tech | Sealaska | SoutheastCan trauma be passed down through DNA? Researchers and Hoonah residents search for answers.June 28, 2019 by Zoe Grueskin, KTOO Share:The city of Hoonah on May 2, 2019 (Photo by David Purdy/KTOO)It’s well known that traumatic experiences can have lifelong impacts on health and well-being. But it’s possible that those effects can last longer than a single lifetime. A new study asks whether the effects of trauma have been passed down genetically in Tlingit families in Hoonah.Audio Playerhttps://media.ktoo.org/2019/06/28TraumaStudy.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.Much of the history is familiar to rural Alaska Native communities anywhere in the state: children taken from their families and sent to boarding schools, language suppressed. But the Tlingit community of Hoonah has also experienced unique traumas, such as a fire that destroyed much of the town in 1944.“This major fire that occurred there in the in the ’40s. And Bureau of Indian Affairs was very much involved in our lives, and at the time, they wouldn’t allow them to rebuild clan houses,” Worl said.Rosita Worl is the president of the Juneau-based Sealaska Heritage Institute (SHI). She’s also an anthropologist. Some of her first work looked at the social and cultural impacts of historical trauma in Alaska Native communities.“And then now, how many years later, to find out that these changes, these impacts, could change our very physiological being,” said Worl.Trauma might even affect our DNA, our most basic stuff. And, if that’s the case, those changes could be passed down through families, impacting people generations removed from traumatic events. It’s a young field of research, and SHI is part of it. The non-profit just launched a study to see if residents and descendants of Hoonah have experienced any genetic changes because of that trauma.Principal investigator Ripan Malhi is a molecular anthropologist at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign. Malhi and his team explain it like this: Your DNA is fixed. It’s like a sheet of music; all the notes are already printed on the page. Those are your genes. But as in music, it’s all about expression.“It’s the musician that can change how the music is played, or you can stress some notes really loudly or play other notes really softly,” Malhi said. “And so that’s kind of like gene expression that changes the level of how the genes are expressed, even though the notes are the same.”Trauma, so the thinking goes, can change someone’s gene expression. And that could impact their health — maybe make them more likely to develop certain diseases — or it could affect the health of their children, even grandchildren.Working with the Hoonah Indian Association, SHI is inviting Tlingit residents and descendants of Hoonah to take part in the study, called Epigenomic Effects of European Colonization on Alaska Native Peoples. Participants have their blood drawn, for the DNA sample, and they complete a survey. It asks about both historic and more recent traumatic events, as well as how participants feel about that trauma, how much they think about it. It also asks about participation in cultural traditions, which could act as a buffer. Malhi and his team will then analyze the DNA samples to see if they can find any evidence of genetic change that tracks with the trauma recorded in the survey. Malhi says they’ll compare what they find to the results of similar studies done with survivors of the Holocaust and the Rwanda genocide.This kind of research is still pretty new, and Malhi says so is the approach. Rather than dropping in on a community, collecting data and leaving, Malhi’s team of scientists is working with Hoonah residents as partners who will give feedback and help direct the research at every step. Starting with what questions to ask and how to ask them.“And when we get results, we’ll come back and provide an update and get some feedback on what the patterns may mean,” Malhi said. “And things that we can’t explain, maybe community members have a good explanation for it.”No samples will be shared with other labs, and SHI and Hoonah representatives will review and edit any papers before they’re published.Malhi says Indigenous communities around the world already have a deep understanding of their own trauma. But genetic evidence of trauma’s impact could be more compelling to Western institutions like state governments or health insurers.“They may not take traditional knowledge as being real, but when scientific knowledge says the same thing, then all of a sudden it becomes real,” Malhi said.Building that scientific knowledge is a long and complicated process, and this is just the beginning. The researchers expect the whole study and analysis to take about eight years, although Worl hopes to share initial findings as soon as next year. “And why do I want to do it? It’s because I think we need to be aware of these kinds of impacts, when we make policy decisions,” said Worl.Worl can see the research informing, for example, the management of subsistence resources. A collapse due to overfishing can be a cultural loss, too.Taking part in a study about your own trauma is heavy work, Worl says, “But yet our people knew that it could be a potential benefit for us. And, you know, I always attribute that to our value system, that we learn from our past to protect our future.”It’s not just history, Worl says. It’s still happening.Hoonah descendants now living in Juneau had the opportunity to participate in the study earlier this month. The researchers are planning a trip to Hoonah in September — aiming for a narrow window between ceremonies and subsistence activities.Share this story:last_img read more

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Ex-Muller chief to replace Rose as Booker chair

first_img whatsapp Read This NextYoga for Beginners: 3 Different Types of Yoga You Should TryFamily ProofHiking Gadgets: Amazon Deals Perfect For Your Next AdventureFamily ProofBest Wine Gifts & Wine Accessories at Every PriceGayotChicken Bao: Delicious Recipes Worth CookingFamily ProofWhat to Know About ‘Loki’ Ahead of Disney+ Premier on June 9Family ProofBack on the Rails for Summer New York to New Orleans, Savannah and MiamiFamily ProofBaked Sesame Salmon: Recipes Worth CookingFamily Proof’A Quiet Place Part II’ Sets Pandemic Record in Debut WeekendFamily ProofIndian Spiced Vegetable Nuggets: Recipes Worth CookingFamily Proof Express KCS Show Comments ▼ Ex-Muller chief to replace Rose as Booker chair by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeInvestment GuruRemember Cote De Pablo? Take A Deep Breath Before You See Her NowInvestment GuruMaternity WeekA Letter From The Devil Written By A Possessed Nun In 1676 Has Been TranslatedMaternity WeekPost FunKate & Meghan Are Very Different Mothers, These Photos Prove ItPost FunTotal Battle – Tactical Game OnlineThe Most Addictive Strategy Game of 2021Total Battle – Tactical Game OnlineEliteSinglesThe Dating Site for Highly-Educated Singles in ScottsdaleEliteSingleszenherald.comMeghan Markle Changed This Major Detail On Archies Birth Certificatezenherald.comEquity MirrorThey Drained Niagara Falls — They Weren’t Prepared For This Sickening DiscoveryEquity MirrorTele Health DaveRemember Pierce Brosnan’s Wife? Take A Deep Breath Before You See What She Looks Like NowTele Health DaveLivestlyThe Best Redhead Actresses, RankedLivestlycenter_img Wednesday 17 June 2015 8:32 pm Share WHOLESALE food supplier Booker Group yesterday announced that Mitchells & Butlers director Stewart Gilliland will replace Richard Rose as chairman next month.Rose, who also chairs online retail group AO World, has been in the role since 2006.Gilliland joined the Booker board in 2010 as a non-executive director. He is also a director of Vianet Group, and holds non-executive roles at C&C Group and Sutton and East Surrey Water. Previously, Gilliland was chief executive of Muller Dairies UK and Ireland, and held senior roles with several other firms, including Whitbread and Interbrew.Gilliland said yesterday the new role was a “privilege” and added: “Richard Rose has been an excellent chairman. Booker has come a long way in the past few years.”Shares in Booker were down by 0.52 per cent yesterday. whatsapp Tags: NULLlast_img read more

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News / WiseTech Global snaps up eighth and ninth as it rides acquisition trail

first_img Australian supply chain software provider WiseTech has announced two more acquisitions today as it continues an aggressive global expansion programme.The company, which listed on the Australian Stock Exchange last year, has agreed to buy rate quotation platforms Cargoguide and CargoSphere in separate deals worth A$6.9m (US$5.5m) and A$11.5m respectively.The deals will add to seven already announced this year, which include swoops on firms in Europe, Latin America and Australasia offering solutions in land transport, ocean freight and customs operations.WiseTech Global chief executive Richard White said: “We are focused on improving productivity, quality, speed, visibility and manageability in the logistics industry and we are delighted Cargoguide and CargoSphere are joining the WiseTech family. © Fgnopporn By Gavin van Marle 12/09/2017center_img “Combining their powerful air and ocean freight rate management solutions with the strengths of the WiseTech Global group and our leading integrated global execution platform, CargoWise One, will be a step forward for the freight forwarding industry.“Both solutions will enhance existing rate management capabilities within CargoWise One, increasing efficiency, accuracy and workflow for our customers worldwide, while our innovation strength and development capacity will further accelerate multi-modal rate management developments.”In a recent investor presentation, WiseTech explains that its acquisition strategy is largely based on targeting firms in new geographic areas and “adjacent” sectors: “We buy into market positions that would years to build, integrate swiftly and drive value across the platform,” it said.The latest deals appeared to boost its share price, which today stood at A$8.50, compared with A$5.50 six months ago.WiseTech appears keen to retain as many of acquired employees as possible, with CargoSphere managing director Neil Barni and Cargoguide MD Jorre Cobelens both set to continue in their roles.Mr Barni said: “We have dedicated over 15 years pursuing our product vision and goal of becoming the leading neutral global ocean rates platform for the shipping industry, and working with WiseTech over the last year we realised that we can both do more and deliver more value to our customers together.“We will benefit from the global strength and powerful innovation capability of WiseTech and we remain committed to integrating with ocean carriers and with our customers, and to delivering on our vision for fully automated digital rate distribution.”last_img read more

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Pharmalot, Pharmalittle: Mylan to meet with Grassley to discuss EpiPen rebates

first_img Pharmalot, Pharmalittle: Mylan to meet with Grassley to discuss EpiPen rebates Pharmalot Log In | Learn More @Pharmalot Alex Hogan/STAT Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free! GET STARTED STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. [email protected] Ed Silverman What’s included?center_img And so, another working week will soon draw to a close. Not a moment too soon, yes? This is, you may recall, our treasured signal to daydream about weekend plans. Our agenda is rather modest. We plan to tidy up around the castle, promenade with the official mascots, and, otherwise, catch up on reading and naps. And what about you? This may be a good time to enjoy the great outdoors, especially since the climate change accord may be in jeopardy. You could reach out to someone special or simply plan the rest of your life. Well, whatever you do, have a grand time, but be safe. Enjoy, and see you soon …Mylan executives have offered to meet with Sen. Chuck Grassley, who chairs the Senate Judiciary Committee, next Wednesday, June 7, The Street reports. The lawmaker threatened to subpoena the company for documents concerning rebates paid to Medicaid for EpiPen. U.S. taxpayers may have overpaid as much as $1.27 billion for the device, according to the U.S. Health and Human Services Department, much more than a purported $465 million settlement. About the Author Reprints GET STARTED By Ed Silverman June 2, 2017 Reprints Pharmalot Columnist, Senior Writer Ed covers the pharmaceutical industry. What is it? Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. Tags drug pricingMedicaidpharmaceuticalsSTAT+last_img read more

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GrowthWorks to take redemption requests

GrowthWorks had hoped to enable unitholders to redeem funds twice per year up to $20 million annually and avoid a run on redemptions, which it would not have been able to handle. What the intervening 14 months did, however, was give the market time to recover and improve the fund’s chances of realizing on some of its investments. David Levi, president of GrowthWorks, says although he was disappointed in the regulator’s decision, the fund’s management team has decided to open it up to take redemption requests. Don’t expect a free-for-all, however. “Our board will provide 30 or 40 days notice to shareholders in advance of a (redemption) opportunity. The shareholders are essentially in the same place without a (redemption management plan) and without a specific target for annual redemptions but there’s an expectation that as money becomes available, investors will be able to redeem on a pro-rata basis,” he says. The British Columbia Securities Commission, the lead regulator on the GrowthWorks file, informed the fund of its decision to reject the redemption management plan on Nov. 29. The next day, it said GrowthWorks responded that it did not want to withdraw its application for the requested relief. “To grant the requested relief, I must consider that to do so would not be prejudicial to the public interest. I have not come to that conclusion,” Peter Brady, director of corporate finance at the BCSC, wrote in his decision. The fund has approximately $220 million in assets and $37 million in debt for a net asset value of slightly more than $180 million, Levi says. In addition to paying off shareholders, GrowthWorks also has a pair of significant cheques to write. First, it owes the Working Opportunities Fund, a related entity, $11 million before the end of December. The larger payable of $24 million to $25 million is to Roseway Capital, a venture capital investment fund, due in May, 2013. Up until June of 2011, Levi said GrowthWorks was liquidating companies at a rate of $40 million to $50 million per year. Beginning that summer, the market dried up and has only recently started to come around. GrowthWorks has been able to realize between $2 million and $4 million on a number of small sales within the portfolio during the latter part of 2012, Levi says. As the manager of the fund, GrowthWorks Capital, has done its share by not collecting its management fees, he says. Last year, that worked out to about $2.5 million. Levi expects that money, however, will eventually be paid out for the services rendered. “As the manager, we expect that the fund will be successful in its liquidity plan. We are here to support the fund and we realize it has a short-term liquidity issue,” he says. The fund has about 30 active companies in its portfolio. Levi says a number of them are doing well and have annual revenues in excess of $40 million. “Our expectation is we’ll continue to grow the portfolio until we’re offered valuations that are appropriate to the success of the company. We need better markets in IPO and (mergers and acquisitions),” he says. A number of its companies are in “very active” discussions with potential purchasers and he expects he’ll be able to make some announcements in the coming months. It’s far too early to predict when the fund might be able to pay off its final shareholder, Levi says, but he’s in no rush. “We will continue to sell companies. There is increased interest by the shareholders to see the companies sold sooner but I don’t think any of them want us to sell companies at a significant discount to their real value,” he says. Keywords Labour sponsored investment fundsCompanies GrowthWorks Ltd. Share this article and your comments with peers on social media Related news Covington Fund II to re-open early next year New name and manager for labour-sponsored fund Facebook LinkedIn Twitter For the first time in more than a year, there’s reason for optimism for shareholders in GrowthWorks Canadian Fund, sponsored by Vancouver-based GrowthWorks Capital Ltd. The beleaguered labour-sponsored venture capital fund, which froze its assets in the fall of 2011 amid a cash crunch caused by falling markets for initial public offerings and mergers and acquisitions, had its redemption management plan rejected by regulators in late November. GrowthWorks dispute remains unresolved Geoff Kirbyson read more

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Tremendous Boost for Quantum Research in Amsterdam Ecosystem

first_imgTremendous Boost for Quantum Research in Amsterdam Ecosystem University of AmsterdamQuantum Delta NL, the public-private foundation that was launched in 2020 with the mandate to coordinate and execute the Netherland’s National Agenda for Quantum Technology (NAQT), has been awarded €615 million from the Dutch Ministry of Economic Affairs and Climate Policy to power the advancement of quantum tech-nology. This gives a tremendous boost to quantum research and development in the Amsterdam ecosystem.As one of the five innovation hubs of Quantum Delta NL, Quantum.Amsterdam acts as liaison to the national quantum activities as described in the NAQT and beyond. Its mission is to connect academia, industry and society in a quantum ecosystem in the Amsterdam region by facilitating knowledge exchange and innovation. As a network organisation, Quantum.Amsterdam has a strong backbone in knowledge partners such as the University of Amsterdam (UvA), Centrum Wiskunde & Informatica (CWI), Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam (VU), and the Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences. Its research base includes QuSoft, the research center for quantum software, and quantum labs at the UvA, which focus on hardware for quantum simulation, atomic clocks and quantum sensing applications.“It is great to see that the field of quantum technologies has moved to this point in time where the Dutch government sees the economic benefit and feels the need to support the joined effort of quantum science and industry in a tremendous way”, says Harry Buhrman (Professor at UvA, Group Leader Algorithms & Complexity CWI, Director QuSoft). Also professor Florian Schreck (UvA) is glad to witness the Dutch government is investing in this revolutionary technology: “The Netherlands is strong in quantum research and has unique high-tech industry. This funding allows us to combine both strengths and thereby bring advances from fundamental research to society”.The new funding, awarded by the National Growth Fund, will benefit many of the activities undertaken by Quantum.Amsterdam, such as quantum awareness programs for companies, a Talent and Learning Centre aimed at educating the quantum workforce of the future, and a program focusing on Ethical Legal and Social Aspects (ELSA) of quantum technologies. “It is fascinating to see how fundamental insights and progress in quantum physics enable new technologies with great promise for society. The Quantum Delta NL program will give a strong push to this development, by supporting research and development, transferring quantum technology to businesses and society, creating quantum awareness and educating a new generation of quantum scientists”, says Kareljan Schoutens (professor UvA & director QuSoft).About QuSoftQuSoft is the Dutch research center for quantum software with an excellent track record in quantum computing and quantum information. Its mission is to explore and develop uses of quantum computers and other quantum technologies at large, for the benefit of society. Moreover, it is the cornerstone of the Quantum.Amsterdam hub.About CWICentrum Wiskunde & Informatica (CWI) is the national research institute for mathematics and computer science in the Netherlands and part of NWO-I, the Institutes Organisation of NWO. The institute pioneered research in quantum algorithms since the mid 1990’s. CWI strongly contributes to Quantum.Amsterdam in this field through the Algorithms & Complexity research group (now part of QuSoft).About UvAUniversity of Amsterdam (UvA) hosts strong quantum physics and computer science research groups. Also, in addition to committed research groups, the university will invest in Quantum.Amsterdam and provide working space in which the scientists, engineers, and companies will work, meet, and cooperate. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:Amsterdam, awareness program, ecosystem, Government, innovation, mathematics, Netherlands, Professor, quantum computer, quantum physics, Scientists, simulation, technology, university, University of Amsterdam, workforcelast_img read more

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Transport Canada issues recall for Chevrolet Orlandos over power steering

first_imgTrending in Canada The Rolls-Royce Boat Tail may be the most expensive new car ever The federal department says dealers will seal the affected connection and repair it as necessary. It didn’t say whether any collision, injury or death has been linked to the defect. Trending Videos RELATED TAGSChevroletOrlandoSUVNewsAutomobile ManufacturingAutomotive ReviewsAutomotive TechnologyCanadaCars and Car DesignChevrolet OrlandoConsumer CyclicalsConsumer Products and ServicesCulture and LifestyleDomestic PolicyGeneral Motors CorporationGovernment and PoliticsIndustriesManufacturing SectorMotor Vehicle ManufacturingOttawaPolitical PolicyPoliticsScience and TechnologyTechnologyTransport CanadaTransportation PolicyVehicle ControlWeatherWinter Weather Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Created with Raphaël 2.1.2 2014 Chevrolet Orlando See More Videos OTTAWA — Transport Canada has issued a recall for 12,035 Chevrolet Orlandos, saying some of them could lose their power-steering assist due to corrosion caused by road salt. The recall affects vehicles from the 2012, 2013 and 2014 model years. General Motors, which sold the minivan in Canada, couldn’t immediately be reached for comment.On its website, Transport Canada says a loss of power steering assist could unexpectedly make steering more difficult and increase the risk of a crash. Transport Canada says the problem can arise if melting snow and water containing road salt enters the vehicle and corrodes a connection in the electric power steering (EPS) module circuit. center_img Buy It! Princess Diana’s humble little 1981 Ford Escort is up for auction An engagement gift from Prince Charles, the car is being sold by a Princess Di “superfan” PlayThe Rolls-Royce Boat Tail may be the most expensive new car everPlay3 common new car problems (and how to prevent them) | Maintenance Advice | Driving.caPlayFinal 5 Minivan Contenders | Driving.caPlay2021 Volvo XC90 Recharge | Ministry of Interior Affairs | Driving.caPlayThe 2022 Ford F-150 Lightning is a new take on Canada’s fave truck | Driving.caPlayBuying a used Toyota Tundra? Check these 5 things first | Used Truck Advice | Driving.caPlayCanada’s most efficient trucks in 2021 | Driving.caPlay3 ways to make night driving safer and more comfortable | Advice | Driving.caPlayDriving into the Future: Sustainability and Innovation in tomorrow’s cars | Driving.ca virtual panelPlayThese spy shots get us an early glimpse of some future models | Driving.ca We encourage all readers to share their views on our articles using Facebook commenting Visit our FAQ page for more information. COMMENTSSHARE YOUR THOUGHTS advertisement ‹ Previous Next ›last_img read more

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EPA Honors Efforts Of CU-Boulder's Science Explorers Coordinator

first_imgColorado students and teachers know more about the function and value of wetlands thanks to a University of Colorado at Boulder outreach coordinator whose efforts have been recognized by the United States Environmental Protection Agency. Lannie Hagan, coordinator of CU-Boulder’s Science Discovery/Science Explorers program, is among six recent winners of “Friend of U.S. EPA” awards. The winners were honored by the agency’s regional office which serves Colorado, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Utah, Wyoming and 27 tribal nations. “The work that Science Explorers does is invaluable to the region because it reaches a very large public audience with the message that wetlands are important and need to be protected,” said EPA hydrogeologist Darcy Campbell, who nominated Hagan for the award. “Lannie has shown a sustained commitment to environmental education. Her workshops consistently get the highest ratings from teachers and students.” Science Explorers offers daylong, activity-based science workshops to teams comprised of a teacher and five students from grades five through eight. Attendees receive materials and curricula to take back to their schools so they can present the activities and concepts to fellow teachers and students. Hagan developed a curriculum for the 2002-03 school year called “Wetlands: Nature’s Water Wonders,” that included lessons on hydrology, wetland plants and wetland soils. The EPA contributed materials and reviewed the curriculum, and the agency’s wetlands team praised Hagan’s work. “Wetlands are important as breeding grounds for animals and rare species of plants, as well as for recreation and to clean water,” Hagan said. “They act as a sponge in times of drought and filter pollutants. “Unfortunately, they’re disappearing at an alarming rate. Only 2 percent of Colorado is wetlands, but that makes what we have left even more important,” she said. This year, Hagan and other Science Explorers teachers led wetlands workshops in 18 locations around the state. In past years, Hagan has written or assisted in creating workshop curricula about glaciers, the ozone and Antarctica, oceanography, thunderstorms, nature’s recycling processes and other topics. Hagan graduated from CU-Boulder in 1972 with a degree in biology and an emphasis in ecology. She said her interest in the environment developed at an early age and was fostered by her father. For more information about the Science Explorers program visit http://www.colorado.edu/ScienceDiscovery/teachers/sciex.html. Published: June 23, 2003 Share Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-maillast_img read more

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Grange: Let Justice be done in Khajeel Mais Case

first_imgFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail The Minister of Youth, Sports and Culture, the Honourable Olivia Grange, MP has made an appeal for anyone with information that can help the police with the case of 17 year old Khajeel Mais, who was shot dead following a road accident on the weekend, to come forward. Minister Grange made the appeal while opening a Regional Meeting of the Inter-American Programme for the Prevention and Eradication of Commercial Sexual Exploitation, Illegal Trafficking and Trade in Children and Adolescents on July 07, 2011 at the Jamaica Conference Centre. Minister Grange said the nation had a responsibility to ensure that justice is done. “I want to use this opportunity to join the rest of the nation in condemning the attack on the teenager.  I urge the shooter to recognise what he has done and to do the right thing by coming forward.  And I call on anyone who knows anything to speak up.  We owe it to Khajeel, and we owe it to all our children to see that justice is done.” Grange: Let Justice be done in Khajeel Mais Case CultureJuly 7, 2011 Advertisements RelatedGrange: Let Justice be done in Khajeel Mais Casecenter_img RelatedGrange: Let Justice be done in Khajeel Mais Case RelatedGrange: Let Justice be done in Khajeel Mais Caselast_img read more

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