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TSX, S&P 500 and Nasdaq set record highs

first_img Three of North America’s stock markets closed at all-time highs Tuesday after getting lifts from strong U.S. corporate results and higher crude oil prices.Canada’s main stock market, the S&P 500 and the Nasdaq composite all set new highs. Related news S&P/TSX composite hits highest close since March on strength of financials sector Toronto stock market dips on weakness in the energy and financials sectors Share this article and your comments with peers on social media “The earnings are coming in higher than expectations and therefore I think it’s creating a bit of confidence, so I think that’s part of what’s going on,” said Dominique Barker, portfolio manager at CIBC Asset Management.The S&P/TSX composite index closed up 92.12 points at 16,669.40, after reaching an intraday high of 16,672.71. The records came a day after closing at its highest point since last July.Energy led the way, gaining 1.44% on higher crude oil prices. Telecommunications lost ground as just three of the 11 main sectors were up on the day.The June crude contract was up US75¢ at US$66.30 per barrel and the June natural gas contract down 5.9¢ at US$2.50 per mmBTU.Oil prices rose for a second day following the Trump administration’s announcement that buyers of Iranian oil must stop purchases by May 1 or face sanctions.The big winners were Encana Corp., Imperial Oil, Canadian Natural Resources, Enbridge Inc. and Suncor Energy Inc.The gain by Suncor is particularly newsworthy because it is the go-to name for foreign money, said Barker.“So that may be an indication that we’ve got foreign non-Canadian money going into the Canadian market finally,” she said in an interview.“We’ve been anticipating that for some time. It’s been surprising how Canadian energy companies have been largely ignored by the world and have been trading at very depressed valuation multiples versus peers and so potentially this is the start of something more significant.”In New York, the Dow Jones industrial average was up 145.34 points at 26,656.39. The S&P 500 index closed up 25.71 points to 2,933.68, after reaching a high of 2,936.31 earlier in the session. Those are the highest levels since Sept. 20. The Nasdaq composite was up 105.56 points at 8,120.82 after reaching 8,128.87 in intraday trading.U.S. markets gained on a variety of corporate results that beat expectations and defied analyst pessimism heading into the first quarter.“Those are pretty good indicators of a strong economy and they’re also large parts of the index,” added Barker.The Canadian dollar traded at an average of US74.51¢ compared with an average of US74.89¢ on Monday.The June gold contract was down US$4.40 at US$1,273.20 an ounce and the May copper contract was down 0.8¢ at US$2.89 a pound.Despite the new record highs, Barker says she’s cautious about the future market trajectories given that many of the global risks, including Brexit and China-U.S. trade, have subsided.“But these are the type of things that can come back fairly violently so I am cautious.” 40556994 - close up image of stock market data on a computer monitor. 123RF TSX gets lift from financials, U.S. markets rise to highest since March Ross MarowitsCanadian Press Keywords Marketwatch Facebook LinkedIn Twitterlast_img read more

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NCAA backs working group recommendations on name, image, likeness

first_img Published: May 1, 2020 The NCAA Board of Governors this week supported rule changes that would open the door for student-athletes to receive compensation for their name, image and likeness beginning in the 2021-22 academic year. At its April 28 meeting, the board directed all three divisions of the NCAA to consider appropriate rule changes based on recommendations from its Federal and State Legislation Working Group, which had presented a comprehensive report to the board. CU Boulder Chancellor Philip DiStefano is a member of the board, while Athletic Director Rick George is a member of the working group.The recommendations now move on to the rule-making structure in each of the three divisions for further consideration. The divisions are expected to adopt new name, image and likeness rules by January 2021. DiStefano sits on the Division I Board of Directors, in addition to the NCAA Board of Governors, and George is a member of the Division I Council.“I enjoyed being part of the working group process, and am excited that the board of governors supported the recommendations in the report so that we can keep moving this important work forward,” George said. “There’s still a lot of work to be done by the divisions to draft legislation and flesh out the details of this framework, and I anticipate we’re on track to meet the January 2021 timeline.”Rule changes supported by the board include allowing student-athletes to receive compensation for third-party endorsements, both related to and separate from athletics. The board also supported compensation for other student-athlete opportunities, such as social media, businesses they have started and personal appearances within the guiding principles originally outlined by the board in October.While student-athletes would be permitted to identify themselves by sport and school, the use of conference and school logos, trademarks or other involvement would not be allowed. The board emphasized that at no point should a university or college pay student-athletes for name, image and likeness activities. The board is requiring guardrails around any future name, image and likeness activities. These guardrails would include no name, image and likeness activities that would be considered pay for play; no school or conference involvement; no use of name, image and likeness for recruiting by schools or boosters; and the regulation of agents and advisors.“The working group should be commended for their efforts in making recommendations that would modernize our rules around name, image and likeness in support of our student-athletes and do so in a way that upholds the NCAA’s mission,” DiStefano said.In other NCAA legislative news from the NCAA Board of Governors, Division I Board of Directors and Division I Council over the past week:The NCAA Board of Governors expanded its existing association-wide campus sexual-violence policy as it relates to the disclosure of student-athlete conduct that has resulted in an investigation, discipline through a Title IX proceeding or a criminal proceeding for sexual, interpersonal or other acts of violence.The Division I Board of Directors and Division I Presidential Forum discussed how to best support schools, student-athletes and incoming student-athletes in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. Both groups discussed several membership requirements and other legislative obligations with the goal of identifying which requirements speak to core values of the division and which might be less vital. Ultimately, the groups decided that requirements that support student-athletes and opportunities for participation are the most important.The board and forum also discussed requests from the majority of Division I conferences to consider providing all Division I members blanket waivers of several legislative and membership requirements. The letters asked for the blanket waivers for a period of two to four years to allow schools to recover from the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic. Both the board and forum endorsed a set of principles to guide the division’s discussion of the requests, including that given the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, examining areas of potential flexibility was appropriate while continuing to preserve opportunities for student-athletes.The groups also received an update from the Transfer Waiver Working Group. This group, appointed by the board last fall, is charged with studying potential changes to the waiver process. Waiver guidelines can be changed at any time, and this group has recommended that waiver guidelines allow the opportunity for a one-time transfer waiver for student-athletes in the five sports not legislatively allowed to transfer and compete immediately: men’s basketball, women’s basketball, baseball, men’s ice hockey and football. The waiver criteria would mirror the legislative opportunity for student-athletes in other sports. The Division I Council could vote on the guideline changes as early as May.Categories:Deadlines & AnnouncementsAthleticsCampus Community Share Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-maillast_img read more

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No new Covid-19 deaths reported in Ireland

first_imgHomepage BannerNews No more Covid-19 deaths have been reported in the Republic today, and just six new cases.It brings the total number of cases to 25,766 and the death toll remains at 1,753. Google+ Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic Pinterest DL Debate – 24/05/21 Previous articleMain Evening News, Sport and Obituaries Monday July 20thNext articleDL Debate Ep 21 – Ryan Ferry / Mo O’Donnell / Paul Campbell News Highland Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODA Twitter Facebook WhatsApp Twittercenter_img No new Covid-19 deaths reported in Ireland By News Highland – July 20, 2020 Facebook Google+ Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th Pinterest WhatsApp Nine til Noon Show – Listen back to Monday’s Programmelast_img read more

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Alcohol forum had multiple bank accounts to manage spending

first_img Pinterest Alcohol forum had multiple bank accounts to manage spending WhatsApp WhatsApp Pinterest Twitter Twitter Previous articleVariable speed limit signs may be erected outside Magherabeg NSNext articleHarps Ciaran Coll in battle to be fit for Derry admin 45 new social homes to be built in Dungloe Homepage BannerNews Disruption to cancer service will increase mortality – Oncologist Hospitalisations rise as Donnelly suggests masks will stay ’til autumn center_img Google+ By admin – February 18, 2016 Donegal hoteliers enjoy morale boost as bookings increase Facebook Today is the 30th anniversary of Eddie Fullerton’s murder The Alcohol forum has said it had multiple bank accounts to allow it account for its spending to various funders.It was reported today that an audit carried out in 2013 highlighted the number of accounts, and suggested that processes be streamlined.The forum, a national initiative based in Letterkenny, is funded by a number of organisations, including the HSE.Spokesperson Kieran Doherty spoke to Greg Hughes this morning:Audio Playerhttp://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/kieran1.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Google+ Facebook Consultation launched on proposal to limit HGV traffic in Cladylast_img read more

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Daniel O’Donnell makes music history in the UK

first_img Pinterest WhatsApp Daniel O’Donnell makes music history in the UK By News Highland – February 23, 2016 Donegal’s Daniel O’Donnell has made chart history in the UK. Twitter Pinterest News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th Journey home will be easier – Paul Hegarty He’s become the first recording artist in the history of the UK Artist Albums Chart, to have had a new album enter every year since 1988 – an unbroken 29 year span. RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic Google+ Facebook Previous articlePeople living in Donegal continue to have the lowest level of disposable incomeNext articlePolice use new powers to forfeit money believed to be in the hands of dissident republicans News Highland Facebook Daniel’s latest album ‘The Best of Music And Memories’ charted on the midweek chart at No. 7, the third highest new entry. Twitter WhatsApp Homepage BannerNews Harps come back to win in Waterford In total, he has reached the UK Artist Albums Chart with more than 35 albums and has now amassed 29 Top 30 albums over the course of his career. DL Debate – 24/05/21 Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows Google+last_img read more

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People / IAG Cargo appoints Pravin Singh to head Asia Pacific and India, as John Cheetham moves back to HQ

first_img By Alex Lennane 14/06/2016 IAG Cargo has appointed Pravin Singh as regional commercial manager, Asia Pacific and India to drive growth across these key markets, ensuring that IAG Cargo continues to expand its footprint.Mr Singh has been at IAG Cargo for 12 years, most recently as area commercial manager, South Asia, and has 20 years of airline experience in total.Mr Singh will manage a team across 23 countries and 50 stations including Australia, New Zealand, South-east Asia, China, Hong Kong, Japan, Korea and South Asia.  He replaces John Cheetham, who takes on the strategy-based role of head of joint business at the carrier.David Shepherd, head of commercial for IAG Cargo said: “Asia Pacific and India are commercially key for our business, covering a vast geographical area. Pravin has delivered an outstanding performance as area commercial manager and has a clear understanding of how to best serve our customers in this region. I have every confidence he will succeed in his new role.”Mr Singh added: “Having managed IAG Cargo’s commercial performance across part of this region for the past four years, I am excited to take up the challenge of managing the broader geographic region and continuing to expand IAG Cargo’s market share.” Pravin Singhlast_img read more

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Ga. Muslim Group: Newton County Must Lift Building Moratorium

first_img Legal Advocate Discusses Medical Abuse At Shut Down Georgia ICE Facility Share A civil rights group is continuing its call for Newton County to end a moratorium on new religious buildings. Edward Mitchell, executive director of the Georgia chapter of the Council on American-Islamic Relations or CAIR, stood with religious leaders and social justice activists Tuesday to condemn the moratorium.It blocks the construction of any new religious buildings in the county for five weeks.The fact that county commissioners approved the moratorium soon after they granted the mosque an administrative-use permit makes it unconstitutional, Mitchell said.“If a Protestant church had made use of the existing law, you and I would not have been having this conversation. We wouldn’t be here,” Mitchell said.Mitchell said, at the request of CAIR, the U.S. Department of Justice is reviewing the moratorium as a possible case of discrimination. If the department declines to investigate, Mitchell didn’t rule out the possibility of private litigation.Newton County said Tuesday the commission had made no further decisions about the mosque. Hundreds, however, showed up at county meetings Monday to express concern about the plans.The mosque on Newton County land is being planned by a Doraville mosque. Along with the place for worship, they hope to build a burial center and possibly a school.Like us on Facebook For Whom The Bell Rings Related Stories ‘It’s Fractured’: Georgia Lt. Gov. Geoff Duncan On Healing Republican Party Add to My List In My Listlast_img read more

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Supreme Court shift could favor rent law challengers

first_imgAmy Coney Barrett (Getty)When landlord groups filed a federal lawsuit challenging New York’s rent law last year, they already had their eyes on the U.S. Supreme Court. Now, with the appointment of a sixth conservative judge, their case may have a better shot at being heard by the nation’s highest court.Amy Coney Barrett was sworn in Monday night as the 115th justice in the court’s history. Her confirmation creates a 6-3 majority of Republican-appointed justices, a shift that could pave the way for various conservative goals, including dismantling the Affordable Care Act and overturning Roe v. Wade. Though rent regulation didn’t come up during Barrett’s confirmation hearings, a conservative majority may be more willing to take up the issue.Read moreLandlord groups appeal rent law rulingAttorney explains strategy to topple rent lawLandlords prepare to fight rent law in court Message* Two landlord groups, the Community Housing Improvement Program and the Rent Stabilization Association, filed a lawsuit challenging New York’s Housing Stability and Tenant Protection Act last July, alleging that it represents an unlawful taking of private property and violates the Fourteenth Amendment’s due process clause because it infringes upon property rights without addressing a “compelling state interest.”“I’m not sure that the modern Supreme Court with Justice Barrett on it is going to be acquiescing quite as much to the idea that simply because there’s a public purpose behind changing a contract that it is ok,” said Jim Burling, vice president of legal affairs at Pacific Legal Foundation, a libertarian legal group. The organization supported a challenge to the state’s rent law that the Supreme Court declined to hear in 2011.Among the 2019 rent law’s provisions most vulnerable to being overturned, he said, is one that delays eviction for one year if a tenant can demonstrate an “inability to obtain other housing or to prevent hardship.” Burling noted that Barrett is a protégé of the late Justice Antonin Scalia, who opposed a similar provision in a California rent control ordinance, which was the subject of a 1988 Supreme Court decision. Still, he said, demonstrating an illegal taking will be no easy task.“It is going to be a tough battle, even with Justice Barrett,” Burling said.The CHIP and RSA lawsuit is a long way from the Supreme Court, and might never get there. In September, a federal court judge dismissed the case, a decision that the groups swiftly appealed.“We think there is a good basis for the court, the Second Circuit, taking a fresh look at the law,” said Andrew Pincus, an attorney for the groups. Last November, the Senate confirmed two judges nominated by President Donald Trump to the Second Circuit of the U.S. Court of Appeals, flipping the court’s majority in favor of Republican appointees.Earlier this month, Ellen Davidson, an attorney at the Legal Aid Society, which is a party to case, said she is confident that even with a conservative majority, the Supreme Court likely will not overturn decades’ worth of case law related to rent regulation.“I guess the question is: How much does the Supreme Court want to blow up our understanding of law over the last century?” she said.“It would completely change the relationship between government and business. A law that requires businesses not to dump toxins into the East River, the Hudson River would be challenged. Anything that made businesses less profitable would be, under that theory, a taking, and therefore unconstitutional.”Contact Kathryn Brenzel Share via Shortlink TagsAmy Coney BarrettRent stabilizationcenter_img Email Address* Full Name* Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedinShare via Email Share via Shortlinklast_img read more

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Cunningham, Mukherji introduce bill to protect Liberty State Park from development

first_img Jersey City high school teacher suspended after rant calling George Floyd ‘a f***ing criminal’ Previous articleJersey City Council still unsure why law firm worked for city after contract terminatedNext articleMiddlesex prosecutor won’t file charges against Alvarez for Brennan rape allegations John Heinis TAGSliberty state parknj assemblynj senateraj mukherjisandra cunningham SHARE Bayonne FBW says Prime Cycle’s new location violates state guidelines for Hoboken waterfront Jersey CityPolitics & Policy Facebook Twitter RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter CarePoint Health reaches deal for Cigna Health Insurance to join their network After years of fighting off proposed development projects from multiple administrations, Liberty State Park would become a protected historic site if a bill introduced by state Senator Sandra Cunningham (D-31) and Assemblyman Raj Mukherji (D-33) is approved. By John Heinis/Hudson County View“It’s time we enshrined in the law the protection of Liberty State Park as a free, open, urban green oasis,” Mukherji said in a statement.“A rare open space jewel in a densely populated urban county and one of only two places in the world from which Ellis Island and Lady Liberty can be accessed, she enhances the quality of life of urban families and visitors from everywhere. Future generations deserve to enjoy Liberty State Park as open space.”The Liberty State Park Protection Act, bill (A-4903 and S-3357), aims to establish an advisory committee and requirements for the state Department of Environmental Protection to safeguard the site from privatization and “inappropriate” development.Encompassing over 1,200 acres, of approximately 600 acres of land and 600 acres of water, where all but the interior’s 235 acres are open to the public.As has been well documented, the park contains significant natural, historic, recreational, scenic, and cultural resources.“Liberty State Park is a beacon of hope that represents all that America has to offer,” added Cunningham.“Tourists are drawn to the beautiful markers and rich history but for Jersey City residents it is a plot of much needed green space in the concrete landscape. This legislation will ensure that the park remains a recreational area free for everyone to enjoy.”In addition to the committee working in conjunction with the DEP with preserving the park, the legislation would prohibit the DEP from considering any proposal to commercialize, develop, or privatize Liberty State Park, except as provided in the bill.Under these provisions, DEP would be allowed to the approve a concession, conveyance, lease, or other agreement with a private entity to provide small-scale commercial activities that directly enhance the experience of a visitor to Liberty State Park.Examples of this includes a bicycle or kayak rental concession, food concession, temporary winter skating rink, commercial boat tour operating from an existing boat slip, and use of the Central Railroad of New Jersey Terminal (“CRRNJ Terminal”), and other uses identified in a management plan.The bill also requires the DEP, whenever it proposes to enter into a concession, lease, or other agreement for a duration of one year or longer, to provide a full public process with public hearings and a public comment period.Additionally, the bill specifically prohibits any concession, conveyance, or lease within the 235-acre natural restoration area in the interior of Liberty State Park, and at Caven Point Peninsula.On top of that, the DEP would be required, within three years after the bill is enacted into law, to develop a management plan for Liberty State Park in consultation with the committee.The bill comes after recent failed attempted to open a casino near the park in 2016 and build a “millionaire’s marina” last year. Community Cunningham, Mukherji introduce bill to protect Liberty State Park from development By John Heinis – January 23, 2019 12:58 pm 0 Community last_img read more

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Initial human trial of Type 1 diabetes treatment begun

first_imgScientists at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) have initiated a phase 1 clinical trial to reverse type 1 diabetes. The trial is exploring whether the promising results from the laboratory of Denise Faustman, Associate Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School, can be applied in human diabetes.A phase 1 trial is usually designed to determine the safety, side effects, and dosage range of a treatment, rather than its usefulness. If the proposed treatment is found to be safe, then researchers may initiate a phase II trial, to test for efficacy, in a relatively small group of subjects.  In previous studies Faustman has demonstrated that mice can be cured ofa form of diabetes closely resembling type 1 in humans. Thosestudies used Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG), a common tuberculosisvaccine, to deplete the abnormal immune cells that attack and destroythe insulin producing cells of the pancreas. The first step in thehuman study, which is currently enrolling volunteers, is to determinewhether the same strategy using BCG vaccination can be used to modifythe abnormal autoimmune cells present in type 1, or so-called “juvenileonset” diabetes.David M. Nathan, MD, director of the MGH Diabetes Center, who isleading the human study at MGH, cautions that this “this is the veryfirst step in what is likely to be a long process in achieving a cure.We first need to determine whether the abnormal autoimmune cells thatunderlie type 1 diabetes can be knocked out with BCG vaccination, asoccurred in the mouse studies.” “We are pleased to be starting human clinical trials,” Faustman said. “Human trials take time, but we are making the step from curing diabetes in mice to determining whether it will work in men and women with diabetes.”Type 1 diabetes, which usually begins during childhood or adolescence, is triggered when the  immune system attacks and destroys the insulin-producing cells in thepancreas. In the absence of insulin, which is necessary for sugar andother nutrients to enter cells, blood sugar levels rise and can cause a variety of severe complications, including kidney failure, loss of vision, amputations, heart disease, and strokes.  The risk for developing complications is closely linked to the elevated blood sugar levels over time. If blood sugar levels are well controlled, the onset of long-term complications can be delayed, and sometimes largely avoided. However, the intensive, on-going therapy required to maintain near-normal sugar levels places life-long demands on the patient, including frequent blood sugar monitoring and at least 3 daily injections of insulin or use of an insulin pump, along with restrictive diets. Insulin doses must be adjusted based on blood sugar levels, dietary factors, and anticipated exercise. Thus, a cure for diabetes has been highly sought after and has attracted much research interest.The clinical trial is using the BCG vaccine because it causes a low-grade inflammatory reaction, which in the mousemodel of autoimmune diabetes lead to the destruction of the abnormalautoimmune cells. It is a particularly attractive candidate vaccine because it has been used safely for nearly 80 years as a tuberculosis vaccine.The Phase I trial is being supported largely through direct and fund raising support from the Iacocca Foundation, and through support from other donors and the Massachusetts General Hospital.  The Iacocca Foundation was founded by Lee Iacocca and his family in 1984 to fund innovative approaches to a potential cure for diabetes.Prospective trial participants should contact the MGH Diabetes Center at 617-726-1847.[HarvardScience does not have any additional information about this story.]last_img read more

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