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Kevin Harvick’s throwback scheme a blast from Busch Beer’s past

first_imgBusch Beer will pay homage to its past with Kevin Harvick’s throwback paint scheme for the Bojangles’ Southern 500 at Darlington Raceway.The Sept. 3 race will see Harvick pilot a No. 4 Ford with a design inspired by the Busch Beer look from the 1980s. Stewart-Haas Racing had been teasing the car reveal this week by posting the classic “head for the mountains” Busch Beer commercials on its social media channels. This season marks the third consecutive year Darlington is hosting a throwback weekend. The celebrated time period is 1985-89.Harvick won the prestigious race in dominating fashion in 2014, his first year with Stewart-Haas. After starting on the pole, Harvick led 238 of 374 laps for his first Darlington victory. In the last five races at the 1.366-mile track, Harvick has finished no worse than fifth and has led a total of 488 laps.Last year, in a Busch Beer car resembling Cale Yarborough’s car from 1979, Harvick finished second after leading over 200 laps.RELATED: Custer to honor Sam ArdHarvick’s Darlington scheme is the first Monster Energy Series car from Stewart-Haas Racing’s four-car stable to be revealed.last_img read more

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Lawyer Gives Full Backpacks To Every Elementary School Kid in Detroit

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreMany of the students in Detroit, Michigan’s schools show up to class with used or secondhand school supplies, making it harder for them to concentrate on learning.One lawyer decided to change the game for every elementary public school student in the city.The Mike Morse Law Firm decided to invest a quarter million dollars to buy 23,000 backpacks filled with school supplies like markers, erasers, folders, pencils, notebooks, and other educational goodies for each student in grades K through 5.Needless to say, the new gifts brought excited back-to-school smiles to children’s faces in 65 Detroit schools.Why 100 Black Men In Suits Were Cheering In Front Of A School Bus (Awesome)“I think it teaches them that there are people out there in the community that care about them,” Mike Morse said in a video highlighting the firm’s efforts. “They want them to succeed, that want them to win at life.”A few days after the video was shot, filmmaker Sean O’Grady spoke with a family who just moved to the city under some tough circumstances and couldn’t afford to buy any uniforms or supplies for their twin fifth graders.Dad Recycles Old Crayons Into New Ones For Schools, Hospitals, And Art Programs“As a result of the donation, they now have all the supplies they need to start the year. The entire family of 5 was incredibly grateful and it was really moving,” O’Grady told the Good News Network. “They heard nothing but bad things about Detroit before moving there, but this helped them realize that there are generous people everywhere.”In preparation for next year, The Mike Morse Backpack Fund is raising more money from public donations to try to give every Michigan student a great start to the school year. Donate at the link above, or at the partnering nonprofit Kids In Need Foundation.(Previously we reported the backpacks each cost $20, but, learned later they were valued at twenty dollars, but purchased at a discount for half the calculated amount.)Sharing Is Caring (Click Below)AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img read more

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Washington Hall ghost haunts on

first_imgIn 1920, All-American football player George Gipp, locked out of his dorm, slept on the steps of Washington Hall and as a result contracted pneumonia and died. Not long after, the Gipper was sighted riding a white horse up the steps of Washington Hall. His ghost has haunted the building ever since. That’s one version. The “Ghost of Washington Hall” has been a staple of Notre Dame’s history, attracting the interest of ghost hunters, curious students and chroniclers of the haunted for nearly a century. They report footsteps, moved objects and the sound of French horns, or bugles, or trumpets, wafting ethereally through the hall.Chris Collins According to “Washington Hall at Notre Dame: Crossroads of the University, 1864-2004,” a book by Film, Television and Theatre emeritus professor Mark C. Pilkinton, the legend around the theatre building began and solidified  in 1921, when Scholastic magazine and the Dome yearbook reported footsteps and the sound of brass instruments. The ghost was first connected to Gipp in 1926, when, as the story goes, a student named Pio Montenegro exited what is now LaFortune Student Center and saw the Gipper on the white horse.The ghost, according to Pilkinton’s book, has also been reputed to be: A “student professor,” responsible for the spooky brass music  A construction workerA steeplejack (yes, those exist) A brother, also responsible for the hornsAn anonymous quarterback, most definitely not the Gipper A student who fell to his death in the 1950s Over the decades, the Ghost of Washington Hall became a popular Halloween feature for campus publications. It regularly makes listicles of the most haunted campuses or the haunted-est places in Indiana. It’s been part of “haunted campus” tours organized by the Students Activities Office. The ghost has also been used to advertise plays in the building or make points about campus issues, like the deterioration of the building or the low quality of the movies shown there. Bigger issues, too. In 1970, Observer writer T.C. Treanor spent a night in Washington Hall, waiting for the ghost. Building staff let him in, but the one student who still lived in the building was having none of it. Neither was the reporter.  Treanor, who graduated in 1973 and is now a lawyer and theatre critic, said he used the ghost story to try to criticize what he saw as his generation’s preoccupation with supernatural beings, at a time when New Age spirituality was beginning to emerge. “If you thought that rational thinking had limits, you were of the party that was open to visitations from the invisible universe,” he said Sunday. “I really wasn’t. I was the son of a scientist. I had grown up through conventional Catholic education, which of course admitted to the presence of a world beyond, but it expressed that presence in a very rational way.” The resulting “series” ended after two articles because Treanor saw no ghost. Nor did he expect to.“Nobody really believes in ghosts — at least no one except marginal illiterates,” he wrote in 1970. “But people want to believe in ghosts — want desperately to believe in ghosts; poltergeists, witches, evil spirits, distilled or otherwise; demons incarnate evil possession. People want to believe it because they want an escape from reality; they want an escape from the rational; the categorized; the systematized. They want ghosts because they want to be afraid, and they want to be afraid because fear is the strongest emotion. Or maybe they’re all stupid. In any event, it’s not true. There are no ghosts in Washington Hall.” “Rest in peace, Gipper,” Treanor concluded. “Sorry for having bothered you.” If Treanor hoped that would put an end to the matter, it didn’t. He had been the latest in a long tradition of intrepid reporters spending the night in Washington Hall dating back to the 1940s, a tradition that continued the very next year, when another Observer reporter, Bill Eiler, set up shop in the auditorium with some friends and a photographer. After several hours, atmosphere in the room changed and the group saw “a waving light-greenish figure … suspended in the air in the left section of the balcony in front of the window curtain.” The photographer snapped a photo, and they hightailed it out of the building. “Three hours and several Hail Mary’s later, the picture turned out and we had our proof,” Eiler wrote.The accompanying photo was of an indistinct white blob. Not only reporters braved the phantasmic for a night. Eiler’s 1971 article recounts meeting a girl who had taken part in a recent seance, though “she was very reluctant to divulge any details.” A 1989 Observer article details how a group of students took a Ouija board onstage, asking the ghost to talk to them. “The pointer darted to ‘No’ and ‘Goodbye’ and stopped. When the students asked why, the pointer moved back and forth between the letters ‘S’ and ‘G,’ moved to ‘Goodbye’ again, and stopped,” the article said. “The students fled. Once out of Washington Hall, they looked back and saw that a security guard had just woken up. They had been warned just in time.” People still ask Washington Hall assistant program manager Kathleen Van Vleet if they can spend the night in the hall (they can’t), but she’s happy to tell campus visitors, alumni and supernatural enthusiasts the story of the ghost of Gipp. “I mean, It’s an old building,” Van Vleet, who has worked in the building for 12 years, said. “The steam heater makes a lot of noise. There’s also some acoustical weirdness, there’s some air shafts on the other side of the auditorium that make it sound like, depending on where you are, it can make people who are talking outside sound like they’re talking inside. I found that out the hard way when I started working here.” Does she believe in the ghost? Van Vleet considered her words. “Let’s say I don’t disbelieve,” she said.Tags: ghost, Observer, Washington Hall, Washington Hall ghostlast_img read more

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Windham County real estate edges back into focus

first_imgPhoto: Betsy Wadsworth is president of the Southern Vermont Board of Realtors covering Windham and Bennington counties. Courtesy photo.by Bruce Edwards, Vermont Business Magazine It’s a tough time to be in any business these days including those who sell real estate for a living. Like many businesses real estate agents, appraisers and home inspectors were among many “non-essential” businesses shuttered by the Covid-19 pandemic.But real estate agencies and many businesses have been given the go-ahead by Governor Phil Scott to go back to work, with restrictions. It means real estate agents can once again show homes in person – an absolute necessity for just about anyone looking to buy a home. Social distancing, however, remains in effect and individuals must wear cloth face masks.“Very, very thankful,” was the reaction of Betsy Wadsworth, president of the Southern Vermont Board of Realtors. “This will allow us to move property into closing, allow appraisers to go in unoccupied homes safely and inspectors to do the same, so we can move properties that are currently under contract to the closing table,” said Wadsworth, a broker associate with Four Seasons Sotheby’s International Realty in West Dover.Wadsworth said statewide there were 1,300 homes in the pipeline (as of April 17) under contract. She said agents can now photograph the inside of homes so those photos can be listed and shown online which is the “first showing” for most buyers.According to the Vermont Association of Realtors website “Services operating with a single worker (such as appraisers, Realtors, municipal clerks, attorneys, property managers…) may resume operations so long as no more than 2 persons (service provider and client) are present at one time.”Prior to Scott’s updated executive order of April 17, non-essential businesses including bars, restaurants and most retail establishments were ordered closed.According to Wadsworth, Vermont had been one of only a handful of states that did not designate real estate as an “essential business.” From the onset of the pandemic, real estate professionals in New Hampshire have been able to go about their business with some restrictions, said Wadsworth, whose group also includes Bennington County.In fact, Wadsworth said all the states adjacent to Vermont, New Hampshire, New York and Massachusetts regard real estate as an essential business. She said Realtors in the Brattleboro area have dual licenses, “so they can work in New Hampshire with guidelines.”Wadsworth said, that left people in Vermont, who are in the process of buying or selling a home, in limbo. It also made it difficult if not impossible to even start the process since most buyers want to visit the home they’re interested in buying.But she also said safety is the first priority and understood the governor was looking out for the interest of all Vermonters. A snapshot of home sales in Windham County showed a decline in March compared to the previous year.There were 36 homes sold in the county in March, down 12 percent compared to the 41 homes sold in March 2019. New pending sales showed a bigger decline, 27 percent compared to a year earlier.The median sales price was down nearly 19 percent to $182,750 from $225,000 the previous March, according to the Vermont Association of Realtors.Year-to-date through March, closed sales were up 4 percent while the median sales price showed a slight increase of 0.5 percent.Wadsworth said there has been an uptick in interest in the second home market. Condo and townhouse sales in March represented 22 percent of total residential sales in Windham County compared to 14 percent in February and  20 percent the prior March.Anecdotally, Wadsworth said this time of year most resort properties are largely vacant. This year she said it appears many of those properties remain occupied.Chris Campany of the Windham Regional Commission said one outcome of the current crisis could result in more people relocating to the state and other rural areas where the contagion was less severe.As deputy commissioner of planning for Orange County, NY, following 9/11, Campany said there was a surge of people moving to the upstate New York community which rippled into adjoining counties.He said that same ripple effect could be felt in Vermont and other less populated areas in the Northeast following the pandemic.Campany said that in turn could result in “more land use pressures than they have seen in quite some time.”“Already there is some anecdotal evidence that people are looking to buy homes in the area,” he said.Another factor in the housing equation is climate change. As sea levels rise, Campany said rural areas like Vermont become more attractive for people looking to escape coastal areas.Bruce Edwards is a freelance writer from Windham County. This story first appeared in the May issue of Vermont Business Magazine.last_img read more

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Every day can be a trainer day: Kinetic pinpoints the virtues…

first_img Related The training experts at Kinetic recommend that riders use a trainer to determine their Functional Threshold Power (FTP) early in the season. Knowing FTP enables a rider to customize his or her training intensity to train smarter, prevent injury, and avoid burnout. It was once difficult for the amateur athlete to determine FTP, but Kinetic aims to make it easy with its inRide app and a fluid trainer, such as the Kinetic Rock and Roll Trainer. Instructions for using Kinetic inRide to determine FTP are provided on the Kinetic blog.Next, Kinetic asks how to determine if one’s training plan is succeeding? A rider can find out in less than an hour and a half by using a trainer and inRide to re-check FTP, which, according to Kinetic, is much more telling than subjective assessments. The training experts at Kinetic recommend that riders perform periodic retests throughout the season in order to assess improvements to fitness level, set new training zones, and continually customize workout intensity.At the races, where traffic, nerves, and distractions abound, Kinetic adds that the most effective way to warm up is on a trainer or rollers, such as the Kinetic Road Machine or the Kinetic Z-Rollers. Coupled with Kinetic inRide and its preprogrammed workouts, trainers ensure predictable, safe, and proper warm ups – and they are travel-friendly, especially when using accessories such as the Kinetic Trainer Bag.Finally, as a few late-season snowstorms have demonstrated, springtime is no guarantee of good riding weather, and the onset of Daylight Saving Time usually adds more activities to the calendar. Trainers circumvent both of these challenges. Keeping an indoor trainer handy means that snow, rain, or extreme heat will not hinder training plans. Parents who find their training time suffering due to busy family schedules can conveniently complete an evening interval session at home after the kids go to bed.Kinetic inRide Watt MeterThe Kinetic inRide stationary trainer-based watt meter system consists of a heart rate monitor and power sensor pod, mounted to any Kinetic fluid trainer, linked together with Bluetooth Smart communication protocol found in iPhones and iPads. Proprietary firmware in the inRide Sensor Pod measures speed and cadence at the tyre and translates that into wattage.Wattage and heart rate data is displayed wirelessly to handlebar mounted compatible iOS devices. Post-workout training data can be uploaded to favourite websites or emailed to friends and coaches. The Kinetic inRide App features include: time in-zone for both heart rate and watts, programmable rider data for training zones and calorie burn, TSS, nPower, iFactor and Mean Maximal Power in 5 increments. Kit MSRP: US$130.00 (Strap and pod also sold separately.)Kinetic Rock and RollThe Kinetic Rock and Roll, the company’s flagship fluid trainer, aims to offer realistic indoor training side-to-side motion. A wide base and four polymer bushings located underneath the fluid trainer and flywheel provide a stable lateral motion.While training indoors, cyclists can perform out-of-the-saddle hill climb intervals, engaging core muscles while simultaneously working on both technique and power. Other features include a wattage calibrated, sealed fluid chamber with magnetically coupled driveshaft for leak-proof performance, 6.25 lb. (2.8 kg) flywheel for realistic coast-down, and removable legs for easy storage. Unconditional lifetime warranty. MSRP: US$579.00Kinetic Road MachineThe Road Machine is Kinetic’s most popular stationary trainer with a leak-proof, wattage calibrated, sealed fluid chamber driven by a magnetically coupled driveshaft and 6.25 pound flywheel. Resistance automatically adjusts as riding speeds change and the flywheel helps to provide realistic feedback during pedaling and coast-down. The fluid chamber is filled with thermodynamically neutral silicone fluid for consistent resistance at varying temperatures. MSRP: US$369.00Kinetic Z-RollersZ-Rollers, named for its tri-folding design, boasts a lightweight aluminum frame and precision-machined 90mm aluminum roller drums. It offers portability and ease of use, making it perfect for race day warm-ups or indoor training sessions. When folded, Z-Rollers are the size of a large briefcase, measuring a compact 21″ x 20″ x 8.8″. It can be stored almost anywhere when not in use. MSRP: US$309.00Kinetic is a division of Kurt Manufacturing, a leading manufacturing company providing high quality precision engineered parts to the zero tolerance industries of aviation and automotive among others.Kinetic designs, manufactures and distributes the ‘world’s only leak-proof cycling trainers’ that provide a realistic ride experience. Designed by people who know about precision and sold through a large network of independent bike stores, Kinetic is a brand for ‘people who demand precision and quality’.www.kurtkinetic.comlast_img read more

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London shares up on back of Arm Holdings takeover

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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Q&A: St Modwen on its spec plans

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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Office-to-resi conversion like clockwork at Aylesbury

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

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UPS in LNG fleet growth

first_imgGet instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270. Subscribelast_img

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Gazprom, Vitol to Enhance Gas Power Cooperation

first_imgSt. Petersburg hosted a working meeting between Alexey Miller, Chairman of the Gazprom Management Committee and Ian Taylor, President of Vitol Group.The parties addressed the issues of bilateral cooperation. Special attention was paid to further development of Gazprom’s underground gas storage business in Europe as well as cooperation prospects in gas-fired power generation, particularly, in the UK and France. The meeting noted that Europe saw a steadily growing demand for Russian natural gas and highlighted the urgency of building up gas storage capacities in proximity to European consumers.The parties outlined specific steps aimed at developing joint activities in the power generation sector based on Russian natural gas.[mappress]LNG World News Staff, December 2, 2013; Image: Gazpromlast_img read more

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