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My LA to Z: Candice Patton

first_imgCelebrityTVMy LA to Z: Candice PattonThe Flash actress on practicing her aim, dirty martinis, and the perfect Valentine’s Day date spotBy Marah Alindogan – February 9, 20151011ShareEmailFacebookTwitterPinterestReddItBrenton Lee SalonThis is where I get my hair cut and colored. I actually met Brenton at another salon, so I have been seeing him for three or four years now. He’s a young guy, but he’s the best colorist and stylist I’ve worked with. What’s really great about his salon in particular is that it’s multi-cultural; No matter your ethnicity, hair type or whatever you’re trying to do you hair, there’s a stylist there for you. It’s a place for everyone.Laemmle Noho Cinema It’s a small, independent movie theater in the Valley that plays a lot of current, popular films. What I love about it is their eight dollar matinee, and there is two dollar parking near by, which is really great. I usually go there alone! A lot of times there is no one there during the day; There’s a lot of legroom and it’s very clean. It’s in a great area of North Hollywood, so sometimes I will stop by one of the really cute restaurants near there and grab something to eat.Wildwood Canyon ParkIt’s great hiking. There are a lot of steep inclines, so it’s a great booty workout for me! I love it because it’s not as busy as Runyon. Wildwood has the same sort of beautiful views, but it’s very quiet and serene. It’s a place where you can hike and not be seen. It takes me about 40 minutes to do the whole thing.Il Cielo It’s probably the most romantic restaurant in Los Angeles. It’s hard not to fall in love when you go there. It’s beautifully lit, there is patio and indoor seating, and the waiters are extremely knowledgeable and professional. There is a lot of great wine, and the entrees are awesome. It’s a good place for a date or for Valentine’s Day. Their menu changes often, but I usually get some sort of fish fillet and some of their really great veggies. And, of course, a bottle of red wine! I prefer a Merlot or Cabernet Sauvignon.Alliance Francaise de Los Angeles It’s a French school in Century City. I studied French in school, and I’ve always been trying to keep it in tact. They have a free open house every term, which is so great. You can take a free, hour-long class and get a feel for the school. The classes are full-immersion so they don’t encourage speaking English in class. I was studying there for six months. There are different kids of people as well–young, old, people in and out of school, people looking for something to do. It’s fantastic.The L.A. Gun ClubIt’s a gun range downtown! I ended up finding it because I had a girlfriend who was going to through divorce, and we were like, “Let’s go shoot guns and get all this bad energy out!” You rent a lane, and they have a really smart and friendly staff. It’s so fun, and it’s a great place to blow off steam. You always end up leaving feeling like a badass–like Lara Croft.The Gallery BarIt’s in the Biltmore Hotel downtown, which is beautiful to begin with, but the bar in particular is really ornate, classy and elegant. It’s the epitome of an old Hollywood bar. There’s beautiful wood, leather and marble. It’s a sexy, mature and upscale kind of place. You have to get a dry martini.Sweet SaltA Top Chef alum opened this bakery and café, and they have a great, fresh, seasonal menu that is always changing. It’s the perfect lunch spot to meet a friend. They also have great bakery items. I personally love their macaroons.Pinches TacosIt’s a small Mexican restaurant that has everything. Usually it’s open until 3 a.m. and is a great a place to stop after a night of drinking. I only get the shrimp tacos because I love them so much that I’ve never tried anything else! I’ve literally stopped there in rush hour traffic because I have to eat it on the way home. They are the best.The Green Man StoreThey’ve got candles, essential oils, books and astrology-related items. It’s a great store if you are into that kind of stuff or looking for gifts. The only thing is that they are closed on Mondays, which is usually the day when I want to go for some reason. It’s hidden deep in North Hollywood, and I don’t know if a lot of people know about it, but it’s just a great little shop.InYoga CenterIt’s my favorite yoga studio because it’s unpretentious and super welcoming. They have really good instructors and a great gift shop. Instructors Nicole Riviere and Joe Kara are so encouraging and challenging at the same time. There are different kinds of classes, but it’s mostly based on skill level. They really focus on the poses and the flow.Shape HouseIt’s literally a house, but it’s a sweat lodge that uses an infrared sauna. You go into these individual beds and they wrap you in a heat blanket and you sweat for an hour. Every bed has its own personal flat screen TV and Roku Box so you can watch your Hulu or Netflix. I always watch two episodes of 30 Rock because it keeps me laughing and gets me through one session. They have showers for you to change in when you’re done and a great meditation room. Sweating is good for a lot of stuff–It helps me get rid of water weight and helps me feel leaner and better.Photograph (9) courtesy pinchestacos.com; All other photographs courtesy facebook.com TAGSInYoga CenterL.A. Gun ClubLaemmle TheatresIl CieloAlliance Francaise de Los AngelesBiltmore HotelBrenton Lee SalonThe Gallery BarThe Green Man StoreWildwood Canyon ParkPinches TacosShape HouseSweet SaltPrevious articleScenes from a Snacknado Invasion with Ian Ziering at Baskin-RobbinsNext articleThe Five Worst Westside Intersections for TrafficMarah Alindogan RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR SponsoredTourism FijiL.A. in Love: Iconic ImagesAsk Chris: Are There Any Businesses Today That Still Use the Phone Numbers Assigned in the 1930s?Space Savers: Meet the People Fighting to See the Past in L.A.’s Futurelast_img read more

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Doctors argue for term limits to diversify medical school leadership

first_img What’s to say that setting limits will lead to change?There’s absolutely no guarantee. I would argue [that term limits] are potentially necessary, but certainly not sufficient. Certainly it’s possible that if you replace leaders with inexperienced versions of themselves, you’re not going to bring new perspectives. But with mindful job posting, search processes that try to inhibit the influence of unconscious bias, and leadership training, we could create an environment within which turnover of leadership positions would actually end up bringing new perspectives to the table.What about other institutional barriers — how might term limits affect them?One of the big challenges is imposter syndrome, which is this feeling that one is not qualified to be where one is. It’s often approached as an individual thing, but it’s not exclusively that. We see that being more common in people who don’t have role models in leadership. To some extent, diversifying the leadership can help transform and change that culture.[Changing leadership could also lead to] some differences in the types of research promoted. It’s not just about achieving parity, but being more attuned to issues of equity, diversity, and inclusion. There are other benefits: A woman may not think that a 70-kilogram white male is the anatomic norm and a smaller black woman is a deviation from the norm. [Diversity in leadership] might actually ensure that there are adequate numbers of clinical trial participants who are women and minorities.The evidence is really compelling that when people from different life backgrounds and experiences interact, they come up with more innovative approaches that help not just women but human health. It’s not just about promoting gender equity to help women. In the end, diversity is also likely to help our achieve our mission to help men as well as women. Dr. Reshma Jagsi is the senior author of a new NEJM perspective piece on term limits in medical school leadership. Michigan Medicine Privacy Policy Leave this field empty if you’re human: Is there an ideal limit?I don’t know that 12 years [like the NIH proposed] is the magic number, and there are many institutions that have their own terms built in, like five-year renewable terms. Maybe you have a norm of two five-year terms, and for really good service, you allow a third five-year term and allow people to have 15 years. But something shy of 43 is probably what we want.Fifteen years might seem like a long time, but even that would be progress compared to what we’re seeing right now.Do you think people will take this proposal seriously?Presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren spoke to my 13-year-old daughter at a campaign event recently and my daughter asked her why she thought sexism was still a thing today. Warren tossed it back to my daughter, who said, “I think men like to be in power.” Warren said she was going to say the same thing, and I think that people who have power don’t like to give it up.It’s a natural response to think that if you turn over all this leadership, there’s going to be chaos and you’re going to have inexperienced people and lose institutional memory, but that’s not what I’m proposing. I’m saying we should have a mindful approach to succession so that we are not dependent on one person’s vision for multiple decades, and term limits are one way to ensure that there is a regular turnover of perspectives. Reporter, Morning Rounds Writer, Intern Coordinator Shraddha writes the Morning Rounds newsletter and covers health and medicine. Related: Earlier this year, the National Institutes of Health announced that the agency’s nearly 300 laboratory and branch chiefs will be limited to 12-year terms to increase the gender and racial diversity among leadership. But in general, the idea of term limits to encourage diversity has been slow to catch on in other research settings, especially medical schools.Among department chairs and other leaders in academic medicine, there is a large gender and racial disparity: Women make up only 18% of medical school deans, while those from other underrepresented minority groups account for 12% of deans.A new perspective paper published Wednesday in the New England Journal of Medicine argues that without a policy shift to set term limits and rectify these gaps, “academic medicine won’t reach gender parity for another 50 years.” At that point, event the youngest physicians — those who are in medical school right now — would be past retirement.advertisement By Shraddha Chakradhar Oct. 17, 2019 Reprints In the LabDoctors argue for term limits to diversify medical school leadership What is the problem in academia right now?We know that now for the first time ever, over half of all U.S. medical students are female. And despite the fact that women really started entering the profession many decades ago, we have not seen a similar diversification of medical school department chairs or deans. When we see that women have constituted over 40% of medical school faculty, but under 20% of leaders, we start to worry that it’s not just the long time it takes to get through the pipeline, but other reasons as well.Why do you think this problem persists?In my mind, there are three major challenges: Unconscious biases that exist, overt discrimination and harassment, and finally gendered division of labor, where women in our society bear a greater burden of domestic responsibility for child care or elder care. Those come together to make it more challenging for women to ascend senior leadership positions in academic medicine.Why term limits?The tendency is for leaders to remain in those positions for a long time.There are people who have been serving for 43 years. In academic medicine, clinical departments in particular have access to very large budgets and department chairs tend to wield substantial power to allocate these funds. Even a very altruistic person will tend to want to have continued access to those resources.But institutions should consider whether at some point there are diminishing, marginal returns to the implementation of one person’s vision, and if there’s a benefit from bringing in other points of view. Shraddha Chakradhar Newsletters Sign up for Morning Rounds Your daily dose of news in health and medicine.center_img Medical schools are starting to diversify. But they’re learning hard lessons along the way Please enter a valid email address. About the Author Reprints @scchak Trending Now: Comparing the Covid-19 vaccines developed by Pfizer, Moderna, and Johnson & Johnson The paper’s authors, all of whom are physicians, looked at the more than 2,100 clinical department chairs across various medical schools in the U.S. and found that men, on average, served as deans for about nine years, compared to women’s six years. Among those who served as department chairs for at least 12 years, only about 7% were women. And fewer than 10% were not white or Asian. STAT spoke with Dr. Reshma Jagsi, a radiation oncologist at Michigan Medicine and senior author of the piece, to learn more. This interview has been lightly edited and condensed for clarity.advertisement [email protected] Tags physicianslast_img read more

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Jennifer Doudna, now a Nobel winner, on CRISPR and its role in medical research

first_img Jennifer Doudna, who was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry on Wednesday morning, along with collaborator Emmanuelle Charpentier, joined STAT at a San Francisco event last June when announcing a collaboration with the drug maker GlaxoSmithKline.The collaboration between University of California, Berkeley, where Doudna is a professor, UC San Francisco, and GSK is to involve up to $67 million over five years. In the video below, Doudna and others talk about the relationship between researchers and drug companies, and the role that CRISPR, a gene-editing enzyme, will play in pharmaceutical research. Nobel Prize winner Jennifer Doudna on how CRISPR can be used for targeting drugsVolume 90%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard ShortcutsEnabledDisabledPlay/PauseSPACEIncrease Volume↑Decrease Volume↓Seek Forward→Seek Backward←Captions On/OffcFullscreen/Exit FullscreenfMute/UnmutemSeek %0-9 facebook twitter Email Linkhttps://www.statnews.com/2020/10/07/jennifer-doudna-now-a-nobel-winner-on-crispr-and-its-role-in-medical-research/?jwsource=clCopied EmbedCopiedLive00:0002:0402:04  STAT reporter Matthew Herper talks with Jennifer Doudna, Hal Barron, and Jonathan Weissman about teaming up to use CRISPR technology in research for new medicines. [email protected] Brian Ach/Getty Images for Wired Senior Writer, Medicine, Editorial Director of Events Matthew covers medical innovation — both its promise and its perils. Matthew Herper Tags CRISPRresearchcenter_img @matthewherper HealthJennifer Doudna, now a Nobel winner, on CRISPR and its role in medical research About the Author Reprints By Matthew Herper Oct. 7, 2020 Reprintslast_img read more

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See where you can get free COVID-19 testing in Hendry & Glades counties

first_imgAdvertisementTags: COVID-19 testingGlades Countyhendry county Glades County man arrested for April golf cart hit and run crash June 3, 2021 AdvertisementDC Young Fly knocks out heckler (video) – Rolling OutRead more6 comments’Mortal Kombat’ Exceeded Expectations Says WarnerMedia ExecutiveRead more2 commentsDo You Remember Bob’s Big Boy?Read more1 commentsKISS Front Man Paul Stanley Reveals This Is The End Of KISS As A Touring Band, For RealRead more1 comments HENDRY COUNTY, Fla. – There will be free drive-thru COVID-19 testing available in Hendry and Glades counties over the next two weeks.Testing will be available to adults and children over the age of 5 years old with parent consent. No appointments are needed and there are no criteria or restrictions for testing. Here is where you can get tested: Glades County Health Department, 1021 Healthpark Drive in Moore Haven – 9-11 a.m. Thursday, December 17, and Wednesday, December 30Hendry County Health Department, 1140 Pratt Blvd. in LaBelle – 9-11 a.m. Monday, December 21, and Wednesday, December 30Hendry County Health Department, 1100 South Olympia, Clewiston – 9-11 a.m. on Wednesday, December 23 RELATEDTOPICS Crews contain Hendry County wildfire May 17, 2021 CenturyLink COVID-19 testing site in Fort Myers to close Sunday May 21, 2021 Advertisement AdvertisementRecommended ArticlesBrie Larson Reportedly Replacing Robert Downey Jr. As The Face Of The MCURead more81 commentsGal Gadot Reportedly Being Recast As Wonder Woman For The FlashRead more29 comments Man sentenced to life in prison for Glades County murder for hire case May 21, 2021 Advertisementlast_img read more

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Fires crews contain Lehigh Acres brush fire

first_img200-acre brush fire sparks in Immokalee June 10, 2021 AdvertisementThursday’s weather in SWFL is ideal for brush fires. CLICK HERE to check your fire danger risk. AdvertisementDC Young Fly knocks out heckler (video) – Rolling OutRead more6 comments’Mortal Kombat’ Exceeded Expectations Says WarnerMedia ExecutiveRead more2 commentsDo You Remember Bob’s Big Boy?Read more1 commentsKISS Front Man Paul Stanley Reveals This Is The End Of KISS As A Touring Band, For RealRead more1 comments Advertisement Advertisement RELATEDTOPICS Wildfires continue in SWFL despite arrival of rainy season June 2, 2021center_img LEHIGH ACRES, Fla. — Rescue crews with the Lehigh Acres Fire Control and Rescue District worked to extinguish a brush fire that ignited on Thursday afternoon.The fire broke out on Milano Avenue South off of Columbus Boulevard. At its peak, the flames charred about an acre of brush.Fire crews fought the flames on all sides as the winds shifted. As of 3:33 p.m., the fire is under control, but crews are still managing some flare ups in the high winds. AdvertisementRecommended ArticlesBrie Larson Reportedly Replacing Robert Downey Jr. As The Face Of The MCURead more81 commentsGal Gadot Reportedly Being Recast As Wonder Woman For The FlashRead more29 comments Lehigh fire officials offer free smoke alarms for senior residents June 3, 2021 Brush fire ignites near Golden Gate church June 4, 2021 AdvertisementTags: Brush firefirefighterLehigh Acres Fire Rescuelast_img read more

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Swiss Re Canada names new CEO

first_img Monica Ningen has been named president and CEO of Toronto-based Swiss Re Canada and English Caribbean, effective July 1, the firm announced on Friday.Ningen will succeed Veronica Scotti, who has been named chairperson of global partnerships. Leah Golob Share this article and your comments with peers on social media PenderFund names new SVP for investments Keywords Appointments Ningen has more than 20 years of experience in the insurance industry, starting her career at reinsurance broker, New York-based E.W. Blanch. She joined Swiss Re in 2016 when the firm acquired GE Insurance Solutions. She has held several leadership roles in property underwriting, most recently as head of property underwriting in U.S. and Canada.“Monica’s business experience and strong leadership skills will be a key asset in helping Swiss Re to grow our business and client relationships in Canada and the English Caribbean,” says J. Eric Smith, president and CEO of Swiss Re Americas. Monica plans to relocate to Toronto in early August. Scotti will move to Zurich in early August, as well. Related news TD getting new head of private wealth, financial planning CETFA elects new board leader employee recruitment human resource selection interview analysis new job appointment bakhtiazein/123RF Facebook LinkedIn Twitterlast_img read more

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Jamaica Red Cross to Feed 5000 Persons over the Next Six Weeks

first_imgJamaica Red Cross to Feed 5000 Persons over the Next Six Weeks UncategorizedAugust 25, 2007 RelatedJamaica Red Cross to Feed 5000 Persons over the Next Six Weeks RelatedJamaica Red Cross to Feed 5000 Persons over the Next Six Weeks FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail The Jamaica Red Cross will be providing some 5000 persons with food supplies over the next six weeks, as the organization targets those most in need in the aftermath of Hurricane Dean.Jamaica Red Cross President, Dr. Jaslin Salmon, addressing a press conference held on (Aug. 24) at the Office of Disaster Preparedness and Emergency Management’s (ODPEM) Camp Road headquarters, said that the organization will also provide roofing and building materials, bedding, hygiene and kitchen kits, clothing, and tarpaulins to 5000 families.“We believe that in the next few weeks, the affected families will require tremendous amounts of support for roof rehabilitation due to extensive damage to people’s homes,” he pointed out.He said the Jamaica Red Cross also recognized the need for grains, seeds and fishing equipment that “would allow people to re-establish their livelihoods,” and will also set up school feeding programmes for basic school children in the affected areas.In addition to the material support, Dr. Salmon informed that the organization has been providing and will continue to offer psychological support to affected families, as well as relief staff.“We recognize over the last few days that the stress levels of the people have been very high, so our psychology support team is activated and is very, very involved throughout the communities,” he noted. He informed that the team has been in St. Elizabeth and will visit Clarendon to provide support in the affected areas.Since the passage of the hurricane on August 19, the Jamaica Red Cross has been heavily involved in shelter management, relief distribution, rapid assessment and the coordination of relief supplies through its international federation, as well as helping families that have become dislocated, to re-establish contact.Dr. Salmon said that the Jamaica Red Cross will facilitate the early transition of dislocated residents from temporary shelters to their homes, and help them to regain some measure of normalcy as soon as possible.Some 140 Jamaica Red Cross volunteers are assisting in the relief effort, and are involved in preparing and packaging food, and the distribution of supplies.center_img RelatedJamaica Red Cross to Feed 5000 Persons over the Next Six Weeks Advertisementslast_img read more

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First U.S. Supreme Court justice from CU known as model of collegiality

first_imgSalt of the Earth Byron White (Econ’38) secured a place in the annals of American law when he joined the U.S. Supreme Court in 1962. His one-time clerk Neil Gorsuch, a former visiting Colorado Law professor and the court’s newest justice, won his place in April.By then, Wiley B. Rutledge (Law’22) lay deep in the history books: The first CU Boulder graduate to serve on the nation’s highest court joined in 1943.Often overlooked due to his short tenure — he died six years later — Rutledge nonetheless established himself as a model of collegiality whose amiable, humble, tough-but-fair ways helped stabilize a group of quarrelsome peers.“Wiley Rutledge had this real skill of making people feel valued and that they were heard,” said Craig Green, a Temple University law professor who has written about Rutledge.A committed advocate for child labor laws, Rutledge used his brief Supreme Court tenure to bolster freedom of speech and religion, the separation of church and state and limits on executive power.Born in Kentucky in 1894, Rutledge studied in Tennessee and at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He began law school at Indiana University while teaching high school, but left to work full time and save money.He and his wife, Annabel, resettled in Albuquerque, taught and kept saving. In 1920 Rutledge resumed law school at CU. Again he taught, at the now vanished Boulder State Preparatory School.Rutledge earned his degree, joined a local firm and then CU’s law faculty.In 1939, after serving as law dean at Washington University in St. Louis and the University of Iowa, he became a judge, named to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia by President Franklin D. Roosevelt.Four years later, he was on the Supreme Court.A tireless worker with high blood pressure, a smoking habit and a taste, Green said, for “meat and potatoes,” Rutledge died in 1949 after a stroke. He was 55.A half-century later, a major biography appeared. Author John Ferren called it Salt of the Earth, Conscience of the Court. The title says it all.    Photo courtesy Rutledge family Issue: Summer 2017Categories:ProfileLaw & PoliticsTags:Supreme Court Share Share via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via TwitterShare via E-mailShare via Google Plus Published: June 1, 2017 • By Eric Gershon Related Articles CU Boulder Law Professor Named to State Supreme Court Melissa Hart joins other Colorado justices with Buff ties. Read more Her Kind of Case As a public defender and attorney, Jeanne Winer didn’t care what crime her clients committed. It was her job to make their lives better one way or another. Read more NOW – Neil Gorsuch In January, the president nominated Neil Gorsuch, a visiting professor at Colorado Law School, for the U.S. Supreme Court. Read more last_img read more

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New online network connects and supports Colorado’s rural entrepreneurs

first_imgLeft: Elizabeth Philbrick and her child, Avery, at EsoTerra Cider in Dolores, Colorado; right: Jared Scott inspects a glass of cider. (Credits: Elizabeth Phiilbrick) John Wittler is tuned into those challenges. He grew up in Pritchett, Colorado, in the southeast corner of the state. Today, he’s a regional coordinator for Ogallala Commons, a non-profit organization that works to “reinvigorate communities and commonwealths in the Great Plains Region.”The story, he said, is a familiar one to anyone who watches the local news in Colorado: Young people in some of the state’s small towns are leaving to seek out job opportunities elsewhere. Baca County, home to Pritchett, had a population of almost 8,000 people in 1950. Today, that number is closer to 3,800, and the State of Colorado projects that it will fall to 2,800 by 2050.“You’ve got an aging population in these communities, and it points to almost a missing generation of leaders,” Wittler said. There are a lot of reasons why starting a business in rural Colorado can be difficult. Many small towns lack the infrastructure that larger cities boast for launching new projects, and the labor force can be small. But there are benefits, too. These communities are often tight-knit and want to see their residents succeed, Wittler said. There are also plenty of young people who want to live and work where they grow up—they just need the chance.“As we change to a digital society instead of an all-physical one, there are opportunities for entrepreneurship in rural communities that haven’t existed before,” Wittler said.Building ecosystemsThe Startup Colorado organization has worked to foster that kind of entrepreneurial environment since 2011. The group collaborates with what it calls “ecosystem builders,” such as state government agencies, small business development councils and organizations like Ogallala Commons, to provide guidance to Colorado entrepreneurs. Its programs have focused on everything from coordinating statewide regional resource calls during the pandemic to sponsoring educational events. The group’s new online network, which was designed in collaboration with rural Coloradans like Wittler, is a central hub where people can meet and share ideas. If a user wants to find marketing advice or get a good recommendation for a CFO in Yuma County, they can post a message to the site. The tool also allows members to form their own mini-groups focused on specific regions or industries. There are currently smaller networks dedicated to local food and agriculture and the outdoor industry, among others.  And while the resource is still in its infancy, it’s been growing steadily with roughly 467 registered users as of March 2021. Keating—who herself lives in the small town of Gunnison—said the project is like a “startup for startups.” Share Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail By Daniel Strain • Published: March 31, 2021 Banner image: Railroad Avenue in Dolores, Colorado. (Credit: CC photo by Jeffrey Beall via Wikimedia Commons)At the height of the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020, Elizabeth Philbrick and her husband Jared Scott weren’t sure about the future of their new business in Dolores, Colorado.The couple had just opened EsoTerra Cider out of what used to be the Mountain Sun Juice factory in Dolores—a town with a population of less than 1,000 people in southwest Colorado. EsoTerra Cider serves up libations with fanciful names like the Quercus Schmercus, Bear Bait and Apre All Day. But as infections were raging across the state, the couple’s business was having trouble covering expenses. And for bureaucratic reasons, the cidery wasn’t eligible for COVID-19 relief loans from the government. Elizabeth Philbrick and Jared Scott’s child, Avery, snacks on the day’s apple harvest. (Credit: Elizabeth Philbrick) So Philbrick and Scott put out a call for help or advice on a new resource: an online tool for small business owners called the Startup Colorado Network. The network was launched in 2020 by Startup Colorado, an outreach program within Silicon Flatirons at the CU Law School. It connects rural entrepreneurs with business resources, as well as fellow business owners, mentors and funders. For EsoTerra, which at the height of apple season employs about seven people, it paid off. Within days, they had received a flood of comments and were eventually able to apply for and receive a loan from a local economic develop fund.“As an entrepreneur, having someone to help walk you through those first few years is immensely important,” Philbrick said. “If you think it takes a village to raise a child, it takes a lot more than just one village to raise a business off the ground.”Delaney Keating, managing director of Startup Colorado, added that her team is also made up of people who live and work in rural Colorado and have a passion for these small towns. While some of these communities have gone through growth spurts in recent years, others are losing residents—posing challenges to people who want to start new businesses there. “Rural Colorado isn’t always underserved or underresourced like many people seem to believe,” Keating said. “There are a lot of resources, but they’re often variable, so we need to connect them in better ways.”Missing generation “The work can be intense, but we hustle hard,” Keating said. “We understand the pain points of these rural entrepreneurs, and we also understand how these ecosystem builders work hard with limited resources to reach people in their regions.”Wittler thinks that the hard work is paying off.“The Startup team has been amazing to work with,” he said. “Their vision has great alignment with what I think needs to happen in rural Colorado.”A lot of loveFor Philbrick, starting a small business in rural Colorado has been a love story of sorts. She and her now-husband met in 2015 when they were both graduate students at Colorado State University. They moved to Dolores so that they could start a family, while also tapping into some of Montezuma County’s hidden gems: historic apple orchards, many of which date back to the early 1900s, that grow rare fruit varieties with names like “jasper jelly” and “the transcendent.”And it’s a passion that they now get to share with someone new: their first child, Avery.“Our little 1-year-old was out on the porch with Jared all summer,” Philbrick said, “just eating a bushel of apples all day.” Categories:Business & EntrepreneurshipBuffs TogetherNews Headlines Top: Delaney Keating (right) talks to Brad Feld (left), managing director of the Foundry Group in Boulder, during an event at the West Slope Startup Week in 2019; bottom: A screenshot from the Startup Colorado Network. (Credits: Startup Colorado)last_img read more

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Docomo stands by bullish outlook for fiscal 2020

first_img Japan-based NTT Docomo introduced a range of lower-priced data plans to attract new subscribers after recording a profit gain and flat mobile revenue for the first three quarters of fiscal 2020 that puts it on track to at least hit its full-year revenue forecast.The operator, which previously said it expects revenue in the fiscal year ending 31 March to increase 9.8 per cent to JPY4.57 trillion ($43.3 billion), noted it is working to exceed that target.Net profit for the nine-month period ending 31 December rose 4.5 per cent year-on-year to JPY566.9 billion, with operating revenue dipping marginally to JPY3.51 trillion.For the October to December quarter, mobile service revenue was flat at JPY685.1 billion; equipment sales grew 15.1 per cent to JPY196.8 billion, rebounding from a 6.6 per cent year-on-year decline the previous quarter.Revenue from its Smart Life business increased 6.2 per cent to JPY153.4 billion, while sales from other business units was also flat at JPY115.2 billion.In an earnings call, the operator unveiled new tiered data plans to be available 1 April, ranging from small data allowances to unlimited. Under the Premium brand, an unlimited plan costs JPY4,480 a month, while 1GB of data is JPY1,480 a month.Flexible plansDocomo EVP Michio Fujiwara said in the call the aim is to offer “accessible services for low-volume customers going forward”, noting amid rising competition last year, all players are now offering similar data rates, but highlighted its network quality and coverage as key benefits to draw in new customers.As a result of more flexible plans first introduced in December, he noted it is beginning to see an improvement in subscriptions, adding it is working to reduce any impact on its bottom-line by lowering marketing and network costs.The operator closed 2020 with 1.4 million 5G subs and expects to have 2.45 million by end-March. Total mobile subscribers increased 3 per cent year-on-year to 81.75 million. Mobile ARPU dropped 4.2 per cent to JPY4,760, after discounts.Capex for the nine-month period increased 6.6 per cent to JPY360.5 billion. Subscribe to our daily newsletter Back Singtel lights SA 5G network 5GNTT-DoCoMo Author HomeAsiaNews Docomo stands by bullish outlook for fiscal 2020 Asia Nokia scores Philippines 5G deal with Dito Previous ArticleGoogle seeks alternative to Australia media rulesNext ArticleMTN flags profit boost on tower asset sales center_img Joseph Waring Telkomsel turns on 5G in major cities AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInLinkedInShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to MoreAddThisMore 08 FEB 2021 Related Tags Joseph Waring joins Mobile World Live as the Asia editor for its new Asia channel. Before joining the GSMA, Joseph was group editor for Telecom Asia for more than ten years. In addition to writing features, news and blogs, he… Read more last_img read more

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