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Swiss Re Canada names new CEO

first_img Monica Ningen has been named president and CEO of Toronto-based Swiss Re Canada and English Caribbean, effective July 1, the firm announced on Friday.Ningen will succeed Veronica Scotti, who has been named chairperson of global partnerships. Leah Golob Share this article and your comments with peers on social media PenderFund names new SVP for investments Keywords Appointments Ningen has more than 20 years of experience in the insurance industry, starting her career at reinsurance broker, New York-based E.W. Blanch. She joined Swiss Re in 2016 when the firm acquired GE Insurance Solutions. She has held several leadership roles in property underwriting, most recently as head of property underwriting in U.S. and Canada.“Monica’s business experience and strong leadership skills will be a key asset in helping Swiss Re to grow our business and client relationships in Canada and the English Caribbean,” says J. Eric Smith, president and CEO of Swiss Re Americas. Monica plans to relocate to Toronto in early August. Scotti will move to Zurich in early August, as well. Related news TD getting new head of private wealth, financial planning CETFA elects new board leader employee recruitment human resource selection interview analysis new job appointment bakhtiazein/123RF Facebook LinkedIn Twitterlast_img read more

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Jamaica Red Cross to Feed 5000 Persons over the Next Six Weeks

first_imgJamaica Red Cross to Feed 5000 Persons over the Next Six Weeks UncategorizedAugust 25, 2007 RelatedJamaica Red Cross to Feed 5000 Persons over the Next Six Weeks RelatedJamaica Red Cross to Feed 5000 Persons over the Next Six Weeks FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail The Jamaica Red Cross will be providing some 5000 persons with food supplies over the next six weeks, as the organization targets those most in need in the aftermath of Hurricane Dean.Jamaica Red Cross President, Dr. Jaslin Salmon, addressing a press conference held on (Aug. 24) at the Office of Disaster Preparedness and Emergency Management’s (ODPEM) Camp Road headquarters, said that the organization will also provide roofing and building materials, bedding, hygiene and kitchen kits, clothing, and tarpaulins to 5000 families.“We believe that in the next few weeks, the affected families will require tremendous amounts of support for roof rehabilitation due to extensive damage to people’s homes,” he pointed out.He said the Jamaica Red Cross also recognized the need for grains, seeds and fishing equipment that “would allow people to re-establish their livelihoods,” and will also set up school feeding programmes for basic school children in the affected areas.In addition to the material support, Dr. Salmon informed that the organization has been providing and will continue to offer psychological support to affected families, as well as relief staff.“We recognize over the last few days that the stress levels of the people have been very high, so our psychology support team is activated and is very, very involved throughout the communities,” he noted. He informed that the team has been in St. Elizabeth and will visit Clarendon to provide support in the affected areas.Since the passage of the hurricane on August 19, the Jamaica Red Cross has been heavily involved in shelter management, relief distribution, rapid assessment and the coordination of relief supplies through its international federation, as well as helping families that have become dislocated, to re-establish contact.Dr. Salmon said that the Jamaica Red Cross will facilitate the early transition of dislocated residents from temporary shelters to their homes, and help them to regain some measure of normalcy as soon as possible.Some 140 Jamaica Red Cross volunteers are assisting in the relief effort, and are involved in preparing and packaging food, and the distribution of supplies.center_img RelatedJamaica Red Cross to Feed 5000 Persons over the Next Six Weeks Advertisementslast_img read more

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First U.S. Supreme Court justice from CU known as model of collegiality

first_imgSalt of the Earth Byron White (Econ’38) secured a place in the annals of American law when he joined the U.S. Supreme Court in 1962. His one-time clerk Neil Gorsuch, a former visiting Colorado Law professor and the court’s newest justice, won his place in April.By then, Wiley B. Rutledge (Law’22) lay deep in the history books: The first CU Boulder graduate to serve on the nation’s highest court joined in 1943.Often overlooked due to his short tenure — he died six years later — Rutledge nonetheless established himself as a model of collegiality whose amiable, humble, tough-but-fair ways helped stabilize a group of quarrelsome peers.“Wiley Rutledge had this real skill of making people feel valued and that they were heard,” said Craig Green, a Temple University law professor who has written about Rutledge.A committed advocate for child labor laws, Rutledge used his brief Supreme Court tenure to bolster freedom of speech and religion, the separation of church and state and limits on executive power.Born in Kentucky in 1894, Rutledge studied in Tennessee and at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He began law school at Indiana University while teaching high school, but left to work full time and save money.He and his wife, Annabel, resettled in Albuquerque, taught and kept saving. In 1920 Rutledge resumed law school at CU. Again he taught, at the now vanished Boulder State Preparatory School.Rutledge earned his degree, joined a local firm and then CU’s law faculty.In 1939, after serving as law dean at Washington University in St. Louis and the University of Iowa, he became a judge, named to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia by President Franklin D. Roosevelt.Four years later, he was on the Supreme Court.A tireless worker with high blood pressure, a smoking habit and a taste, Green said, for “meat and potatoes,” Rutledge died in 1949 after a stroke. He was 55.A half-century later, a major biography appeared. Author John Ferren called it Salt of the Earth, Conscience of the Court. The title says it all.    Photo courtesy Rutledge family Issue: Summer 2017Categories:ProfileLaw & PoliticsTags:Supreme Court Share Share via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via TwitterShare via E-mailShare via Google Plus Published: June 1, 2017 • By Eric Gershon Related Articles CU Boulder Law Professor Named to State Supreme Court Melissa Hart joins other Colorado justices with Buff ties. Read more Her Kind of Case As a public defender and attorney, Jeanne Winer didn’t care what crime her clients committed. It was her job to make their lives better one way or another. Read more NOW – Neil Gorsuch In January, the president nominated Neil Gorsuch, a visiting professor at Colorado Law School, for the U.S. Supreme Court. Read more last_img read more

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New online network connects and supports Colorado’s rural entrepreneurs

first_imgLeft: Elizabeth Philbrick and her child, Avery, at EsoTerra Cider in Dolores, Colorado; right: Jared Scott inspects a glass of cider. (Credits: Elizabeth Phiilbrick) John Wittler is tuned into those challenges. He grew up in Pritchett, Colorado, in the southeast corner of the state. Today, he’s a regional coordinator for Ogallala Commons, a non-profit organization that works to “reinvigorate communities and commonwealths in the Great Plains Region.”The story, he said, is a familiar one to anyone who watches the local news in Colorado: Young people in some of the state’s small towns are leaving to seek out job opportunities elsewhere. Baca County, home to Pritchett, had a population of almost 8,000 people in 1950. Today, that number is closer to 3,800, and the State of Colorado projects that it will fall to 2,800 by 2050.“You’ve got an aging population in these communities, and it points to almost a missing generation of leaders,” Wittler said. There are a lot of reasons why starting a business in rural Colorado can be difficult. Many small towns lack the infrastructure that larger cities boast for launching new projects, and the labor force can be small. But there are benefits, too. These communities are often tight-knit and want to see their residents succeed, Wittler said. There are also plenty of young people who want to live and work where they grow up—they just need the chance.“As we change to a digital society instead of an all-physical one, there are opportunities for entrepreneurship in rural communities that haven’t existed before,” Wittler said.Building ecosystemsThe Startup Colorado organization has worked to foster that kind of entrepreneurial environment since 2011. The group collaborates with what it calls “ecosystem builders,” such as state government agencies, small business development councils and organizations like Ogallala Commons, to provide guidance to Colorado entrepreneurs. Its programs have focused on everything from coordinating statewide regional resource calls during the pandemic to sponsoring educational events. The group’s new online network, which was designed in collaboration with rural Coloradans like Wittler, is a central hub where people can meet and share ideas. If a user wants to find marketing advice or get a good recommendation for a CFO in Yuma County, they can post a message to the site. The tool also allows members to form their own mini-groups focused on specific regions or industries. There are currently smaller networks dedicated to local food and agriculture and the outdoor industry, among others.  And while the resource is still in its infancy, it’s been growing steadily with roughly 467 registered users as of March 2021. Keating—who herself lives in the small town of Gunnison—said the project is like a “startup for startups.” Share Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail By Daniel Strain • Published: March 31, 2021 Banner image: Railroad Avenue in Dolores, Colorado. (Credit: CC photo by Jeffrey Beall via Wikimedia Commons)At the height of the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020, Elizabeth Philbrick and her husband Jared Scott weren’t sure about the future of their new business in Dolores, Colorado.The couple had just opened EsoTerra Cider out of what used to be the Mountain Sun Juice factory in Dolores—a town with a population of less than 1,000 people in southwest Colorado. EsoTerra Cider serves up libations with fanciful names like the Quercus Schmercus, Bear Bait and Apre All Day. But as infections were raging across the state, the couple’s business was having trouble covering expenses. And for bureaucratic reasons, the cidery wasn’t eligible for COVID-19 relief loans from the government. Elizabeth Philbrick and Jared Scott’s child, Avery, snacks on the day’s apple harvest. (Credit: Elizabeth Philbrick) So Philbrick and Scott put out a call for help or advice on a new resource: an online tool for small business owners called the Startup Colorado Network. The network was launched in 2020 by Startup Colorado, an outreach program within Silicon Flatirons at the CU Law School. It connects rural entrepreneurs with business resources, as well as fellow business owners, mentors and funders. For EsoTerra, which at the height of apple season employs about seven people, it paid off. Within days, they had received a flood of comments and were eventually able to apply for and receive a loan from a local economic develop fund.“As an entrepreneur, having someone to help walk you through those first few years is immensely important,” Philbrick said. “If you think it takes a village to raise a child, it takes a lot more than just one village to raise a business off the ground.”Delaney Keating, managing director of Startup Colorado, added that her team is also made up of people who live and work in rural Colorado and have a passion for these small towns. While some of these communities have gone through growth spurts in recent years, others are losing residents—posing challenges to people who want to start new businesses there. “Rural Colorado isn’t always underserved or underresourced like many people seem to believe,” Keating said. “There are a lot of resources, but they’re often variable, so we need to connect them in better ways.”Missing generation “The work can be intense, but we hustle hard,” Keating said. “We understand the pain points of these rural entrepreneurs, and we also understand how these ecosystem builders work hard with limited resources to reach people in their regions.”Wittler thinks that the hard work is paying off.“The Startup team has been amazing to work with,” he said. “Their vision has great alignment with what I think needs to happen in rural Colorado.”A lot of loveFor Philbrick, starting a small business in rural Colorado has been a love story of sorts. She and her now-husband met in 2015 when they were both graduate students at Colorado State University. They moved to Dolores so that they could start a family, while also tapping into some of Montezuma County’s hidden gems: historic apple orchards, many of which date back to the early 1900s, that grow rare fruit varieties with names like “jasper jelly” and “the transcendent.”And it’s a passion that they now get to share with someone new: their first child, Avery.“Our little 1-year-old was out on the porch with Jared all summer,” Philbrick said, “just eating a bushel of apples all day.” Categories:Business & EntrepreneurshipBuffs TogetherNews Headlines Top: Delaney Keating (right) talks to Brad Feld (left), managing director of the Foundry Group in Boulder, during an event at the West Slope Startup Week in 2019; bottom: A screenshot from the Startup Colorado Network. (Credits: Startup Colorado)last_img read more

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Docomo stands by bullish outlook for fiscal 2020

first_img Japan-based NTT Docomo introduced a range of lower-priced data plans to attract new subscribers after recording a profit gain and flat mobile revenue for the first three quarters of fiscal 2020 that puts it on track to at least hit its full-year revenue forecast.The operator, which previously said it expects revenue in the fiscal year ending 31 March to increase 9.8 per cent to JPY4.57 trillion ($43.3 billion), noted it is working to exceed that target.Net profit for the nine-month period ending 31 December rose 4.5 per cent year-on-year to JPY566.9 billion, with operating revenue dipping marginally to JPY3.51 trillion.For the October to December quarter, mobile service revenue was flat at JPY685.1 billion; equipment sales grew 15.1 per cent to JPY196.8 billion, rebounding from a 6.6 per cent year-on-year decline the previous quarter.Revenue from its Smart Life business increased 6.2 per cent to JPY153.4 billion, while sales from other business units was also flat at JPY115.2 billion.In an earnings call, the operator unveiled new tiered data plans to be available 1 April, ranging from small data allowances to unlimited. Under the Premium brand, an unlimited plan costs JPY4,480 a month, while 1GB of data is JPY1,480 a month.Flexible plansDocomo EVP Michio Fujiwara said in the call the aim is to offer “accessible services for low-volume customers going forward”, noting amid rising competition last year, all players are now offering similar data rates, but highlighted its network quality and coverage as key benefits to draw in new customers.As a result of more flexible plans first introduced in December, he noted it is beginning to see an improvement in subscriptions, adding it is working to reduce any impact on its bottom-line by lowering marketing and network costs.The operator closed 2020 with 1.4 million 5G subs and expects to have 2.45 million by end-March. Total mobile subscribers increased 3 per cent year-on-year to 81.75 million. Mobile ARPU dropped 4.2 per cent to JPY4,760, after discounts.Capex for the nine-month period increased 6.6 per cent to JPY360.5 billion. Subscribe to our daily newsletter Back Singtel lights SA 5G network 5GNTT-DoCoMo Author HomeAsiaNews Docomo stands by bullish outlook for fiscal 2020 Asia Nokia scores Philippines 5G deal with Dito Previous ArticleGoogle seeks alternative to Australia media rulesNext ArticleMTN flags profit boost on tower asset sales center_img Joseph Waring Telkomsel turns on 5G in major cities AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInLinkedInShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to MoreAddThisMore 08 FEB 2021 Related Tags Joseph Waring joins Mobile World Live as the Asia editor for its new Asia channel. Before joining the GSMA, Joseph was group editor for Telecom Asia for more than ten years. In addition to writing features, news and blogs, he… Read more last_img read more

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Man arrested in Lyra McKee murder probe

first_imgHomepage BannerNews Facebook Previous articleDealz to open new store in Buncrana tomorrowNext articleStrabane River Walkway a step closer News Highland By News Highland – July 15, 2020 A man has been arrested in connection with the murder of journalist Lyra McKee in Derry. She was killed while observing rioting in the city in April 2019.The 27 year old suspect was arrested in Derry this morning.He’s been taken to Musgrave police station in Belfast where he’s being questioned.A search of a house in Derry has also been carried out. WhatsApp News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic Pinterest Google+ Twitter Twittercenter_img Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows DL Debate – 24/05/21 Man arrested in Lyra McKee murder probe RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR WhatsApp Google+ Pinterest Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODA Facebook Harps come back to win in Waterford last_img read more

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Watch: SA Rugby magazine teaser video

first_img Posted in SA Rugby mag, Springboks, Top headlines, Videos Tagged Mag Teaser Video, SA Rugby mag, Siya Kolisi ‘ ALSO READ: B&I Lions tour tickets go on sale ‘ ‘ From the magazine: Jano Vermaak names his Perfect XVFormer Springbok, Bulls, Lions and Stormers scrumhalf Jano Vermaak names a team of the best he played alongside and against.SA Rugby MagUndoLife Exact BrazilGrace Jones Is Now 72 Years Old, This Is Her NowLife Exact Brazil|SponsoredSponsoredUndoCNAHow is life for Cambodian boy linguist after viral fame?CNA|SponsoredSponsoredUndoShop Bras Online | Search AdsTake a Look at These Bra and Panty SetsShop Bras Online | Search Ads|SponsoredSponsoredUndoGoGoPeak10 Most Beautiful Cities You Should Visit Once In Your LifetimeGoGoPeak|SponsoredSponsoredUndoLoans | Search AdsLooking for loan in Hong Kong? Find options hereLoans | Search Ads|SponsoredSponsoredUndo Five one-cap Boks that could still represent South AfricaSA Rugby MagUndo BuzzAura16 Cancer Causing Foods You Probably Eat Every DayBuzzAura|SponsoredSponsoredUndo Springbok captain Siya Kolisi is on the cover of the latest SA Rugby magazine. Get it in-store today!ALSO READ: Mthethwa won’t ‘jump the gun’ over players not kneelingcenter_img MoneyMorningPaperThe 10 Richest Families Of The World. Especially No. 6 Is A Complete Surprise.MoneyMorningPaper|SponsoredSponsoredUndo 熱門話題對肚腩脂肪感到後悔!試了在萬寧賣的這個後…熱門話題|SponsoredSponsoredUndo Watch: SA Rugby magazine teaser video Video published on August 19, 2020 Post by SA Rugby magazine ‘ ‘ ‘ AlphaCuteOprah’s New House Cost $90 Million, And This Is What It Looks LikeAlphaCute|SponsoredSponsoredUndoWorld Cup-winning Bok quartet in Eddie Jones’ all-time XVSA Rugby MagUndoWatch: Kolbe makes Test players look amateur – Ugo MonyeSA Rugby MagUndoShop Bras Online | Search AdsBrilliant Bra and Panty Sets (take a look)Shop Bras Online | Search Ads|SponsoredSponsoredUndolast_img read more

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3 inmates save deputy after he loses consciousness, splits head open in fall

first_imgGwinnett County Sheriff’s OfficeBY: ELLA TORRES(ATLANTA) — Three inmates in Georgia are being praised after they came to the rescue of a deputy who lost consciousness and fell to the ground, splitting his head open, officials said.“We are deeply appreciative to these three inmates for the courage, determination and kindness they displayed. … These inmates had no obligation whatsoever to render aid to a bleeding, vulnerable deputy, but they didn’t hesitate,” the Gwinnett County Sheriff’s Office said in a Facebook post on Tuesday. The deputy, who was not named, fell ill while supervising the jailhouse unit. It was not clear what happened to him, but the inmates noticed he “appeared to be feeling poorly” and as they kept an eye on him, saw that he fell to the ground and split his head open, according to the sheriff’s office.The inmates, who were also not named, began pounding on their doors and soon were joined by the entire unit.The deputy later told officials that while he did not realize he’d been unconscious, he became aware of the pounding and thought an inmate needed help, so he rose to his feet and pressed the control panel to open the cell doors, according to the sheriff’s office.He then lost consciousness again.The three inmates who had initially been watching him came to his aid and radioed for help.“We’re happy to report that our deputy survived the harrowing incident and is recovering at home until he can return to duty,” the sheriff’s office said.Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Fund manager finds way around capital gains distributions

first_imgBy moving securities out of the portfolio without selling them, Huber can better manage the fund’s annual capital gains distributions, which can hit mutual fund investors even in years when a fund posts a negative return.The strategy resembles the way that exchange-traded funds redeem by giving shares back to a middle person, known as an authorized participant, who stands between the ETF and the investor. That’s one of the reasons ETFs are much more tax-efficient than actively managed mutual funds.“He’s essentially treating investors that want their money back as separate from the pool of assets in the fund, because he’s transferring some of the underlying stock into a new entity, without penalizing the broader investor base,” said Todd Rosenbluth, director of mutual fund and ETF research at CFRA.“The technique is highly beneficial to other shareholders, who often are dragged along for the ride when fellow shareholders have shorter time horizons,” Rosenbluth said. As an investor in the mutual funds he manages, Joe Huber will do whatever it takes to avoid those pesky capital gains distributions that can blindside and frustrate long-term investors. While mutual funds almost always honor fund redemptions with cash, they can also provide investors with actual securities from the fund.“We have from time to time negotiated with non-taxable clients to move money into separate accounts, and we deliver them securities,” Huber explained. “Because they’re non-taxable [qualified accounts] we get to decide which tax lots we deliver them.” While moving securities into separate accounts has proven effective in reducing the tax hit, Huber said there are reasons most fund companies are not following his lead.“We’re not the only ones to figure this out, but there are negatives associated with it that other fund companies probably don’t want to deal with,” he said. “For starters, you have to call up clients, wasting a touch point by asking them to do some work for you.”Huber said that he “incentivizes” investors to go along with moving the assets into separate accounts by offering to manage the assets in the separate accounts for a reduced fee.“The separate account is an expensive proposition that cost me $10,000 a year per account,” he said. “My first four tax management tools are basic blocking and tackling, but don’t require a ton of work. This fifth one requires a ton of work and involves working with bankers, accountants, custodians and lawyers.”Christine Benz, Morningstar’s director of personal finance, described Huber’s strategy of moving securities to separate accounts as “very clever.”“Most mutual fund prospectuses include language that funds can redeem in kind,” she said. “It is nicely addressing the disadvantage that ETFs have uncovered in active mutual funds.”center_img The founder and chief executive of Huber Capital Management applies four basic tax management strategies and then goes to the next level with a fifth technique that has enabled the $400 million fund shop to avoid paying out “material” capital gains distributions over its entire 14-year history.“I say we never paid out any material capital gains because one year we had less than a penny in capital gains distributions,” Huber said.Most of Huber’s tax management strategy resembles the approach taken by other tax-conscious portfolio managers.He pays close attention to opportunities for tax-loss harvesting and he tries to avoid short-term taxes by holding securities for at least a year, which folds into his long-term investing approach. And when Huber wants to reduce the weighting of a security, he will use inflows to dilute that weighting instead of triggering a taxable event by selling securities.Huber separates his fund company from virtually every other asset manager in the business by employing a tax management strategy that borrows a page from the ETF industry. ETFs stealing the stage from mutual fundslast_img read more

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Director of Admissions

first_imgGENERAL DESCRIPTION OF POSITIONThe Director of Admissions will provide vision, leadership, anddirection to the planning, budgeting, administration and evaluationof recruitment and admissions processes. This position will beresponsible for enhancing enrollment opportunities with K-12 andcommunity partners through innovative initiatives and data-drivenassessment. Additionally, this position will work collaborativelywith other stakeholders at the college regarding the growth andexpansion of enrollment initiatives related to marketing, divisionand program-specific recruitment, and new student onboarding andretention.ESSENTIAL DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES1. Provides leadership and strategic direction for the Office ofAdmissions including the functions of recruitment, admissionsprocessing, and onboarding.2. Supervises admissions and recruitment staff at multiplecampus locations.3. Develops and implements measurable recruitment plans to meetenrollment targets in collaboration with stakeholders and relatedfunctional areas.4. Manage the departmental budget for all areas ofresponsibility.5. Establish a rapport and maintain working relationships withindividuals key to the continual recruitment of traditional,non-traditional, online, international, transfer, concurrent, andnon-credit students. Maintain open lines of communication and seekfeedback regarding possible avenues of improvement and betterpractices to serve the local communities and school districts.6. Coordinates and manages student recruitment correspondenceand messaging from the office of Admissions.7. Develops annual admissions forecasts and predictiveenrollment models based on local, state, and national data.Continually assess and evaluate reports and data based on priorterms and academic years.Required Education and/or Experience: Master’s degreerequired in higher education administration, leadership, or humanrelations.Preferred Education and/or Experience:  Five years ofmanagement experience in Student Services including studentrecruitment experience at a two-year college.last_img read more

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