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Graduate students interview community-engaged artists

first_img Ethan Bach: Designing Inclusive Futures with Art + Technology Armando Silva: Connecting Hip-Hop, Art, Dance and Community Amy Kimberly: The Art of Creating Community Experiences As part of our office’s Engaged Arts and Humanities Graduate Student Scholars program, scholars interview community-engaged artists and activists with vast experience. Modeled after our office’s Engaged Scholars Interview series, these conversations with mentors are designed to bring the process of community-engaged practice to life.Read the interviews below conducted by the 2020–21 scholars to learn how these exemplary and award-winning practitioners avoid “savior complexes,” address inclusivity and equity, get feedback on the impact of their work and deal with unexpected challenges. Applications for 2021–22 are due March 2. Gladys Preciado: Antiracist Practice Beyond the Museum’s Walls Lares Feliciano: Willing to be Uncomfortable to Reflect the Times Share Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-maillast_img read more

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More Magazine News: Rouleur Now Every Two Months

first_imgAnd, um, that’s it really. It’s good news: Rouleur, while slightly po-faced at times, is for me far and away the best source of good writing on cycling. Focused very much on road riding, and majoring on the history of road racing, it features stunning archive photography and new work from some great snappers. The picture here is by Taz Darling of Yozo Shimano. There’s an interview with him and the beginnings of a history of his company in the current issue, as well as pieces on nutrition, Team Z and a photo story of the Tour of California.last_img read more

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HSBC enters Romania with €104m buy

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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Muruks has backing despite Tigers’ win

first_imgRugby League BY FRANKIY KAPIN Lae Snax Tigers coach Stanley Tepend admitted that the Mendi Muruks had the crowd behind them despite hosting the Muruks in round three of the Digicel cup in Lae, Morobe on Sunday. “It was always a bonus to have the crowd behind you and the Muruks knew very well that the Lae crowd would be behind them,” he said. “I expected it to go that way. They (Muruks) have always got a big support in Lae. In games like this you need the support. We had like 20-30 per cent and they had the 70 per cent and when the game is going tough like that it can go either way. The support sort of pushes you that little bit.” Tepend added that the Muruks came to Lae knowing that they had the support and put a great performance but the Tigers had to win at home. “Credit to our boys for their defense and our fitness towards the end paid off,” Tepend said. He said the Tigers did well cutting down on easily giving away the ball through loose ends but just discipline and penalties gave the Muruks good field territory. Tepend said the Tigers forward stood out with Mark Piti, Rex Yallon, John Andy, Ishmael Balkawa and Tikiko Noke putting on an excellent display and setting the foundation. Tepend also commended his halves Mark Tony and Towari Kenake for the controlled game. Tigers have three straight wins since the start of the season. He said they are looking forward to a strong away game next weekend against the NCDC Port Moresby Vipers in the nation’s capital.last_img read more

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Freddie takes the medal

first_imgPSC Golf from The Golf ClubMonday, Dec. 29, Green Valley (white tees) – Monthly Medal1st Fred Graham (20) net 712nd Dave Mather (9) net 713rd Billy Eyles (19) net 72 T-4th Paul Butler (16) net 73T-4th Peter Rogers (23) net 73T-4th Chuck Anderson (10) net 73T-4th Takao Yokata (16) net 73T-4th Brent Philp (13) net 73It was a full house today with our 9 tee times and 36 golfers off to our regular Monday venue of Green Valley.  The course was in great shape and some of the lads took advantage of it.  It looked like 73 was the magic number and 5 golfers were tied right there.Fred Graham with his prize TGC Antigua shirt.Only one 72 was turned in by Billy Eyles, the previous week’s winner.  The remaining two blokes took it all the way down to a count back and sorry Dave, you just missed out this time mate!  It was Fred Graham down to the wire and his back nine just got past Dave Mather as Freddie took the shirt off his back to claim this months’ Medal award and a TGC Antigua shirt.  Better luck next time Dave, I know you are saving your best for the Ryder Cup in Chiang Mai!Tuesday, Dec. 30, Khao Kheow (white tees) – Stableford1st Graham Eldridge (36) 38pts2nd Phil Smedley (10) 35pts3rd Stephen Dunn (0) 34ptsA local’s favourite, Khao Kheow is always one of our most popular golf trips.  We really don’t mind which of the 3 nine’s we play but today was B and C and they proved a good challenge.Only one golfer shot his handicap or better of a field of 24.  High handicapper Graham Eldridge did the best on this tough golf course to top the podium for today’s comp.  Nice to see Captain Phil hold his own and do us proud with a 35 out here.The most interesting story of today’s event was a guy who hasn’t picked up a club in 7 years, played off scratch, and goes out and shoots a 34!  Stephen Dunn took a remarkable 3rd place on his first outing with us and from what I was told, he is the real deal.  Yes, he was a former pro, so watch this space as we look forward to seeing him play with us on his comeback for 2015.  Nice to have you with us mate!Friday, Jan. 2, The Emerald (white tees).– Stableford1st Nick Handscombe (12) 38pts2nd Billy Eyles (19) 36pts3rd Courtney Bailey (8) 34ptsFrom the sound of it, the Emerald is suffering a bit.  Many courses cannot handle this dry weather we are having and water is needed here please!  This is such an enjoyable track, and I have written many times of these 4 par-3 holes as being such a great collection of short challenges.  Hopefully the greenskeeper will get out the hoses.Never mind, it made no difference to Nicky Handscombe who favoured the conditions to take most of Phil’s Christmas card envelopes at the afternoon presentation.  Billy Eyles was right up there again, but with his handicap dropping so fast we may just have a chance here soon.Our buddy Courtney Bailey is back with us on a visit from his teaching position in Egypt and his 34 was a great score given he plays about 10 times a year now.  Looking good in that power suit dude.Note:  The Golf Club is located on Soi LK Metro.  Just call 085 434 3377 or see our website www.golfclubpattaya .com and for more information mail us: [email protected] and see updates at www.facebook.com/golfclubpattaya… all handicaps welcome!last_img read more

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Olympic boxers to fight without headgear, worry about cuts

first_imgFILE – In this July 31, 1976, file photo, Leon Spinks, right, of the United States, lets a right fly at the face of Sixto Soria, of Cuba in an Olympic light heavyweight boxing match at the XXI Summer Games in Montreal. For the first time since 1980, men in Rio de Janeiro will box in the Olympics without wearing headgear. (AP Photo/File) “I’m always going to do what I have to do,” Vargas said. “I don’t think it’s really changed my style. I’ll still have the same style going into the Olympics. I just have to be careful.” The International Boxing Association (AIBA) made a highly visible alteration to its sport when it removed the headgear ahead of the 2013 world championships. Many fighters are excited for fans to see a sport that looks more like the pros, but the move is still criticized by other fighters and coaches who believe safety has been made secondary to appearance, particularly because of the high potential for cuts in a short, multi-fight tournament.“I don’t think it was a good idea, taking off the headgear, because we’re still amateur,” U.S. light flyweight Nico Hernandez said. “I got cut on both eyes before. I got stitches and stuff from head-butts. I just don’t think it’s as safe for the amateur boxers. But I also like it, because you can have more peripheral vision and you don’t get as hot. I’ve had a lot of fights without now, so I’m used to it.”The bulky protective pads were placed on Olympic fighters’ heads in 1984 because organizers wanted to improve safety, and they’ve been pulled off the fighters heading to Rio for ostensibly the same reason.In its lengthy quest to become a professional boxing promoter with control over the Olympics , AIBA went to great lengths to establish a scientific backing for its decision to drop headgear. The IOC also cited research to support the notion that the bulky head guards reduced the number of knockouts and stoppages, thereby reducing concussions.Their conclusions have been disputed by other scientists and fighters alike, but the benefits of removing headgear go beyond any concussion data in an inherently dangerous sport: Quite simply, the removal of headgear allows television audiences to see the fighters’ faces.Billy Walsh competed in headgear for his native Ireland at the 1988 Seoul Olympics before becoming one of the amateur sport’s foremost teachers. The new U.S. coach has adjusted his instructions under the new rules.“Without the headgear, we’ve now got to be a bit more mobile, a bit more flexible, a bit more careful of heads,” Walsh said. “We’ve got to be a bit more elusive. With headgear, we just locked up. We’ve had to adapt some skills and techniques, but we’ve adapted similar stuff we would have been teaching when they had headgear. We all have to adapt.”AIBA’s changes are expected to continue after Rio, too. Women’s boxing kept the headgear for its second Olympic tournament because AIBA says it doesn’t have enough concussion data on women, but most female fighters expect AIBA to remove their headgear next year. The male boxers are still wearing tank tops in the ring in another holdover from the sport’s amateur days, but those are likely to be removed soon as well.Hernandez is among dozens of top Olympians who got experience without headgear by participating in World Series of Boxing, one of two professional leagues launched by AIBA. The WSB fighters have five-round fights that largely resemble pro bouts.Even fighters who don’t agree with the science of the decision credit AIBA for attempting to improve their sport’s marketability, and the governing body has conducted a lengthy campaign to persuade boxers to fight without the in-close, head-butting style that could ruin the tournament.Most of the American fighters also plan to turn pro shortly after the Olympics, so the absence of headgear gives them a head start on the process.But all fighters in Rio will have to be careful with the knowledge that one cut could end their Olympics.“With no headgear, at first I was nervous, and I didn’t really want to do it,” 18-year-old U.S. middleweight Charles Conwell said. “But when I got in there, it was the same, basically. You just have to worry about cuts and head-butts. I’m less worried now, because I’ve got more experience with it. I know the dos and don’ts of not having headgear on. So I’m going to adjust, because I know there’s going to be some dirty things that are going to happen out there.” “I’m always going to do what I have to do,” Vargas said. “I don’t think it’s really changed my style. I’ll still have the same style going into the Olympics. I just have to be careful.”center_img The International Boxing Association (AIBA) made a highly visible alteration to its sport when it removed the headgear ahead of the 2013 world championships. Many fighters are excited for fans to see a sport that looks more like the pros, but the move is still criticized by other fighters and coaches who believe safety has been made secondary to appearance, particularly because of the high potential for cuts in a short, multi-fight tournament.“I don’t think it was a good idea, taking off the headgear, because we’re still amateur,” U.S. light flyweight Nico Hernandez said. “I got cut on both eyes before. I got stitches and stuff from head-butts. I just don’t think it’s as safe for the amateur boxers. But I also like it, because you can have more peripheral vision and you don’t get as hot. I’ve had a lot of fights without now, so I’m used to it.”The bulky protective pads were placed on Olympic fighters’ heads in 1984 because organizers wanted to improve safety, and they’ve been pulled off the fighters heading to Rio for ostensibly the same reason.In its lengthy quest to become a professional boxing promoter with control over the Olympics , AIBA went to great lengths to establish a scientific backing for its decision to drop headgear. The IOC also cited research to support the notion that the bulky head guards reduced the number of knockouts and stoppages, thereby reducing concussions.Their conclusions have been disputed by other scientists and fighters alike, but the benefits of removing headgear go beyond any concussion data in an inherently dangerous sport: Quite simply, the removal of headgear allows television audiences to see the fighters’ faces.Billy Walsh competed in headgear for his native Ireland at the 1988 Seoul Olympics before becoming one of the amateur sport’s foremost teachers. The new U.S. coach has adjusted his instructions under the new rules.“Without the headgear, we’ve now got to be a bit more mobile, a bit more flexible, a bit more careful of heads,” Walsh said. “We’ve got to be a bit more elusive. With headgear, we just locked up. We’ve had to adapt some skills and techniques, but we’ve adapted similar stuff we would have been teaching when they had headgear. We all have to adapt.”AIBA’s changes are expected to continue after Rio, too. Women’s boxing kept the headgear for its second Olympic tournament because AIBA says it doesn’t have enough concussion data on women, but most female fighters expect AIBA to remove their headgear next year. The male boxers are still wearing tank tops in the ring in another holdover from the sport’s amateur days, but those are likely to be removed soon as well.Hernandez is among dozens of top Olympians who got experience without headgear by participating in World Series of Boxing, one of two professional leagues launched by AIBA. The WSB fighters have five-round fights that largely resemble pro bouts.Even fighters who don’t agree with the science of the decision credit AIBA for attempting to improve their sport’s marketability, and the governing body has conducted a lengthy campaign to persuade boxers to fight without the in-close, head-butting style that could ruin the tournament.Most of the American fighters also plan to turn pro shortly after the Olympics, so the absence of headgear gives them a head start on the process.But all fighters in Rio will have to be careful with the knowledge that one cut could end their Olympics.“With no headgear, at first I was nervous, and I didn’t really want to do it,” 18-year-old U.S. middleweight Charles Conwell said. “But when I got in there, it was the same, basically. You just have to worry about cuts and head-butts. I’m less worried now, because I’ve got more experience with it. I know the dos and don’ts of not having headgear on. So I’m going to adjust, because I know there’s going to be some dirty things that are going to happen out there.”,COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. (AP) — Although Antonio Vargas still thinks about the cut that nearly ended his Olympic dream, his unprotected head will be clear when he steps into the ring in Rio de Janeiro.Vargas grew up sparring and competing in protective headgear, so he had never been cut in a fight before his face split open in that bloody loss at the U.S. Olympic team trials seven months ago. The gifted flyweight from Florida had to fight his way back through the challengers’ bracket, surviving to earn a spot on the team.Cuts haven’t been a major concern in Olympic boxing since 1980, but they will be a constant danger in Rio, where the 250 male fighters will box without headgear for the first time since Moscow. Fighters have had three years to adjust to the change, and they’ve adapted with the same tenacity that made them boxers in the first place. COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. (AP) — Although Antonio Vargas still thinks about the cut that nearly ended his Olympic dream, his unprotected head will be clear when he steps into the ring in Rio de Janeiro.Vargas grew up sparring and competing in protective headgear, so he had never been cut in a fight before his face split open in that bloody loss at the U.S. Olympic team trials seven months ago. The gifted flyweight from Florida had to fight his way back through the challengers’ bracket, surviving to earn a spot on the team.Cuts haven’t been a major concern in Olympic boxing since 1980, but they will be a constant danger in Rio, where the 250 male fighters will box without headgear for the first time since Moscow. Fighters have had three years to adjust to the change, and they’ve adapted with the same tenacity that made them boxers in the first place.last_img read more

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The new kick off times that the RFEF want in La Liga next season

first_img 05/03/2019 The debate over kick-off times in La Liga continues. Spanish Federation (RFEF) chief Luis Rubiales wants to get rid of Monday night games, saying last week that “business is important but fans are more important.”  Upd. on 06/03/2019 at 12:40 CET He says the reason for getting rid of the Sunday noon game is so that professional football does not clash with academy football on Sunday mornings.  Rubiales hopes that by next season there will be no Monday night games and he also wants to get rid of the midday kick-offs on a Sunday.  IN SPORT.ES Speaking to COPE, he said that Friday night games will continue: “It’s a good slot for the fans to begin their weekend with some football.”  By canceling the early Sunday and the late Monday games, Rubiales hopes to have three matches kicking off simultaneously on Sundays at 18.30h.  sport.es Los horarios que quiere la RFEF para la próxima Liga NO HABRÁ MÁS FÚTBOL LOS LUNES.A partir de la próxima Temporada en @laliga habrá fútbol sábados y domingos ��Veremos qué ocurre con los viernes, si llegamos a un acuerdo bueno para todos.El negocio es importante pero más los aficionados ��‍��‍��‍��Somos la @rfef#SomosFútbol ��⚽ pic.twitter.com/hp8R01hPSv— Luis Rubiales (@LuisRubiales) 1 de marzo de 2019last_img read more

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Nelson Minor Hockey opens up registration for 2016-17 campaign

first_imgFor more information, and/or to register, go to the Nelson Minor Hockey website. Now that the hockey season is winding down, it’s time for parents and players to prepare for next season as Nelson Minor Hockey has opened up the registration lines for applications for the 2016-17 campaign.Players wanting to play Rep Hockey should note the deadline for registration is May 31, 2016. This allows executive members and coaches to plan for tournaments and games for the upcoming season.House players have until uly 31, 2016 to sign up for the upcoming season.last_img read more

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NUIG Turn Over Trinity In Sigerson Cup

first_imgNUI Galway  4-12   Trinity College 1-07 NUIG are through to the next round of the Sigerson cup where they will face St. Mary’s next Tuesday. The maroon and white started off with a flier with a goal from Sean Kelly coming in the opening minute. His goal was matched by Adam Gallagher who hit the back of the net from the penalty spot after Stephen Conroy’s shot on goal had been foot-blocked. Gallagher added a free and a point from play alongside his spot kick and when Michael Daly struck the ball over the bar, it was 2-3 to no score. Trinity eventually got off the mark through Bryan McGee with James Guinness and Dylan Brady following suit to give the Dublin outfit three points without reply. Adam Gallagher was having yet another outstanding game for the college and set up midfielder Enda Tierney for a point before grabbing another one of his own. Dylan Brady responded with a well taken point for Trinity but just on the stroke of half time, Michael Daly curled over a beauty to leave it 2-6 to 0-4 at the break.NUIG showed their continued dominance from the get-go. Tierney collected the restarting ball before feeding Adam Gallagher who assisted Damien Comer in his only point of the day.  Stephen Conroy nailed over another for NUIG soon after and with ten points between the teams in the 40th minute, the tie was all but finished. Ruairi Greene was unlucky not to grab himself a goal after his bullet of a shot was saved by Trinity ‘Keeper Liam Brady. Trinity had a goal chance of their own minutes later but Guinness’ shot was saved on the line by Stephen Brennan. It was only a matter of time before more goals did come. Adam Gallagher and Stephen Conroy combined well for the Maroon and White before squaring the ball to substitute Colm Kelly who fisted into the net. James Guinness rattled the net for Trinity from the restart with a fine taken goal but it was cancelled out soon after. Peter Cooke drove in a high ball towards Comer who broke it down for Matt McClean who had the easy task of slotting the ball home. Three Trinity points closed the show but they were comprehensively beaten by a strong NUIG team who march on to the next round.Speaking after the game, NUIG manager Maurice Sheridan had his focus firmly on the next round but was worried about the injury that Michael Daly picked up towards the end.“It was a bit of an impact on his leg. We don’t know what it is yet but we hope he is okay, because he is a fine player.” “We are reasonably happy to be honest. The lads played well enough but still it wasn’t a great performance either from our perspective,” “There were a lot of unforced errors. The wind made it hard for both teams but a win is a win. We are on the road now, we have to go to Belfast next Tuesday and that’s going to be a hard one”.NUI GALWAY: Adam Gallagher 1-4 (1-0pen, 0-2f), Sean Kelly 1-2, Matt McClean 1-1, Colm Kelly 1-0, Michael Daly 0-2, Enda Tierney, Damien Comer and Stephen Conroy 0-1 eachTRINITY: James Guinness 1-1, Dylan Brady 0-3, Cian O’ Donoghue, Ross McCullagh and Bryan McGee 0-1 eachNUI GALWAY: Tadgh O’ Malley (Galway), Stephen Brennan (Mayo), Eoin O’ Donoghue (Mayo), Aaron O’Connor (Kerry), Sean Kelly (Galway), Kevin McDonnell (c) (Sligo), Luke Byrne (Galway), Enda Tierney (Galway), Peter Cooke (Galway), Stephen Conroy (Mayo), Michael Daly (Galway), Adam Gallagher (Mayo), Ruairi Greene (Galway), Damien Comer (Galway), Owen Gallagher (Antrim)Subs: Colm Kelly ((Donegal) McDonnell H/T) Gerry O’ Kelly-Lynch ((Sligo) O’Connor H/T) Matt McClean ((Donegal) O. Gallagher 45’) Ryan Forde ((Galway) Daly 52’) Kevin Finn ((Roscommon) A. Gallagher 56’) Christian Bonner ((Donegal) Comer 56’)TRINITY COLLEGE DUBLIN: Liam Brady, Jack Bell, KeelanBeirne, Matthew Shorthall, Daniel Quinn, Tadhg McGahern, James Guinness, Paul Kelly (Morgan Walsh 47’), David Boothman, Stephen Ward (James Cox 45’), Conor O’Driscoll (Simon Owens H/T), Cian O’Donoghue, Ross McCullagh, Bryan McGee, Dylan BradyRef: Marty Duffy (Sligo)print WhatsApp Facebook Twitter Email Darragh Berry at Dangan, NUIGlast_img read more

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Athenry Beat Crumlin United In FAI Junior Cup

first_imgAthenry are into the FAI Junior Cup quarter-finals after coming from behind to beat Crumlin United in Drom. Aaron Leggett gave the Galway side the early advantagebut they found themselves 2-1 behind at half-time against their Leinster SeniorLeague opponents. But strikes from Jackson De Silva and a 73rd minute winner for Cathal Fahy ensured Athenry advanced to the final eight.print WhatsApp Facebook Twitter Emaillast_img

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