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Avison Young trims tri-state workforce

first_imgAvison Young CEO Mark RoseUPDATED 9:14 p.m., April 21, 2020: Avison Young has made cuts to its tri-state workforce as the commercial real estate firm girds its balance sheet against the economic downturn.The Canadian-based company laid off employees across its tri-state offices in New York, New Jersey and Connecticut, sources told The Real Deal.The exact number of affected employees could not be immediately confirmed. One source put the figure as high as 100, but the company on Tuesday evening claimed it was closer to a dozen. The brokerage’s tri-state operation had grown to about 200 employees since launching in 2012.A spokesperson for Avison Young initially declined to comment but directed TRD to a statement the company put out three weeks ago laying out “strict cost-containment measures” it was taking in light of the slowdown. They included temporary pay cuts for high-salaried employees, canceling events and suspending travel to “protect jobs and minimize layoffs or furloughs.”Avison is the latest commercial real estate services firm to make cutbacks as the economy takes a hit from the coronavirus pandemic. Senior leaders at Newmark Knight Frank have reportedly been asked to take pay cuts and eliminate positions as affiliate Cantor Fitzgerald plans hundreds of layoffs.Cushman & Wakefield recently announced its senior leadership will be taking reduced pay, and Paul Massey’s B6 Real Estate Advisors has laid off employees.Avison Young launched its New York area operations eight years ago as it pushed to expand aggressively outside Canada with backing from Vancouver-based private equity firm Parallel49 Equity.The company tapped industry veteran and longtime Cushman & Wakefield CEO Arthur Mirante to lead the effort. Mirante tapped former JLL vice president Mitti Liebersohn in 2015 to head up the New York City office, and in 2018 Colliers president Joseph Harbert joined the firm as president of the Northeast region.Avison’s investment-sales ambitions got a boost that year when former Massey Knakal Real Estate Services and Cushman & Wakefield broker James Nelson joined the firm and started building up a sales team.Avison ranked as the eighth-most active office-leasing brokerage in New York City and as the 11th most-active in terms of sales, according to TRD’s most recent tallies.The company got a capital injection two years ago when Canadian pension fund manager Caisse de dépôt et placement du Québec invested $250 million into Avison, buying out Parallel49 Equity’s stake.Contact Rich Bockmann at [email protected] or 908-415-5229 This content is for subscribers only.Subscribe Nowlast_img read more

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Simeon Albert re-elected as chairman

first_img 106 Views   7 comments LocalNews Simeon Albert re-elected as chairman by: – October 8, 2013 Simeon AlbertIncumbent chairman, Simeon Albert has been re-elected chairman of the Canefield Urban Council.Mr Albert, who obtained 174 votes at the election which was held on September 16th, was re-elected by the eight- member Council with five votes.The other contender for the Chairman position was Michael Coipel who obtained 189 votes at the elections and three votes from the councilors on Tuesday.The other councilors are as follows; Michael Coipel, Michael Timothy, Joyce Dupuis, Jefferson Mc Pherson and the three members appointed by Community Development Minister; Irma Lafond, Franklyn Fabien and Jerry Abraham.The Council, which will be inaugurated on 15th October, will serve for three years.This is Mr Albert’s fifth consecutive term as chairman of the Council.There has been controversy by some members of the community regarding the performance of Mr Albert. The issue of roads and the lighting of streets in the community are some of the major areas which has been largely criticized by the individuals. Mr Albert announced last week that a $65,000.00 contract was signed recently for the rehabilitation a portion of road within the community. He also told Dominica Vibes that government is also expected to assistance in the restoration process of the road leading to the Canefield Industrial Site. Dominica Vibes Newslast_img read more

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Saving the world’s kids from fire

first_imgZimbabwean toddler Tapera Jani at the start of his treatment for both burns and kwashiorkor at the Children of Fire shelter in Johannesburg. (Image: Irin Photo)A few months ago Tapera Jani, a three-year-old boy from a farm outside Bulawayo in southern Zimbabwe, walked into a fire. The toddler was left with life-threatening burns to his legs and, in a country with a collapsed health system, no-one to help him.Luckily the owner of the farm on which Tapera lived with his parents had heard of Children of Fire, a South African organisation which  rescues and rehabilitates children across the world who fall victim to fire.In all developing countries, fire is the essential source of energy for poorer households. And whether it is in paraffin lamps, charcoal braziers or flaming piles of wood, fire will often cause accidents injuring, disfiguring and often killing those households’ children.Children of Fire was founded in South Africa by journalist Bronwen Jones after, in 1994, she met Dorah Mokoena, a toddler who almost died in a shack fire in a squatter camp. The fire burnt off Dorah’s face, eyesight and hands – leaving her blind, her features melted into scar tissue, and with stumps at the end of her arms.Jones and her son Tristan took Dorah into their home, where the girl, now a teenager, is a permanent member of the family. Unlike many, she has had the benefit of reconstructive surgery, with her nose and lips rebuilt, and some ability to communicate restored.Dorah’s disfigurement made her the poster child for Children of Fire. She has helped attract the more privileged world’s attention to the horrific physical dangers millions of children face being born into families surviving on nothing.With three-year-old Tapera, Jones and her team were ready to deal with his burns. But the toddler was also a victim of Zimbabwe’s collapse – its meltdown economy and nonexistent healthcare.A citizen of a country that recently was the breadbasket of Southern Africa, the boy was suffering from kwashiorkor, a life-threatening form of malnutrition caused by a lack of protein – and a disease unknown in Zimbabwe 10 years ago.“If Tapera had not died of his burns, he would have died of starvation in [Zimbabwean president Robert] Mugabe’s country,” said Jones, kissing the now-healthy and smiling child.“He weighed 8.5kg when he arrived. We expected him to weigh double that for his biological age.”Children of Fire, established in South Africa over a decade ago, is now registered as a charity in the UK. It has helped 70 children with severe burns and 200 from across Africa who required less complicated surgery.“We continue to help the 70 children who need complicated surgery,” Jones said.The organisation has come to expect complications in each case it takes up.“There is poverty and HIV/Aids in the region – as we help to heal the children, we have to deal with all their problems,” said Jones.Reconstructive surgery is expensive, particularly reconstructing faces and limbs ravaged by fire.“It can cost anywhere between R40 000 (US$4 123) to R1-million ($103 095) per child,” she said. The charity, therefore, takes on few surgical cases.“The ones we do, we know no-one else would help; for example, if the child is also HIV-positive.”The organisation’s focus is therefore not on expensive surgery. Its more important work is helping children damaged by fire come to terms with their disability, cope with the social stigma of their disfigurement, and develop the courage to reintegrate with family, friends and society.“I often end up being rude to people who stare at my children, despite my telling them not to do so, as it upsets them,” Jones said.“Acceptance and getting people to see the child inside is perhaps the most difficult thing.”Children of Fire works with a network of doctors, surgeons and healthcare specialists, most volunteers. The charity has never received government aid, and operates entirely on public donations, using volunteers from across the world.“My son Tristan calls us a boot-camp for spoilt European students,” said Jones. Children come and go out of the house which serves as a home and office for the charity in Melville, a suburb of Johannesburg in Gauteng province. A school near the main building, with a staff of three teachers, helps educate the children while they are in the organisation’s care.More than 90% of burn injuries across the world occur in developing countries, with 70% of these burn victims children, according to statistics from the Welsh Centre for Burns and Plastic Surgery in the UK and the Dow University Medical College Burns Centre in Pakistan.According to Children of Fire estimates, at least 15 000 South African children are burned every year. The incidence of burning is higher in winter, when the need for warmth means more fires, and more chance for tragic accidents.In South Africa’s five biggest cities an average of 200 people die in shack fires every year, according to Abahlali baseMjondolo, a South African shack dwellers’ movement.Besides helping children with burn injuries, Children of Fire also tries to educate people shacklands and other poor and unserviced residential areas on preventing fires.“These are simple measures such as not cooking on the ground [where children may easily walk into fires] and not allowing children to sleep alone with an open fire,” said Jones.The organisation also provides construction materials and other household essentials to communities that have been victims of fire.Jones has also been trying to get the authorities to implement a ban on the use of a particular brand of unsafe cooking stove that leaks paraffin oil.“These stoves cost only about R40 (about $4), while the safer ones cost about R200 (about $20), which few residents in squatter camps can afford.“I wish someone could help with cheaper, safer versions.”MediaClubSouthAfrica.com reporter and Irin News Do you have queries or comments about this article? Email Mary Alexander at [email protected] articlesChampioning the children of fire Useful linksChildren of Fire Irin Newslast_img read more

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Boeing unveils 777X to employees

first_imgBoeing has unveiled its giant Boeing 777X to its employees in a low key event at Everett Washington.No media attended after the grand unveiling was canceled in the wake of the Ethiopian Airlines tragedy on Sunday.These photos were taken by a Boeing employee and provided to Sam Chui.Boeing is building two models of the 777X family: the 400-seat -9, which will be the first to roll out and the longer range -8, which can seat 350 passengers and has a range capability of more than 17,220 km.SEE Video 777X takes to the sky in GermanySEE Greenpoint’s luxury 777X interior. The driving force behind the 777X is Emirates’ President Sir Tim Clark, whose airline is the lead buyer with an order for 150.Sir Tim describes the 777X as “an absolute peach”.Key to his enthusiasm is the aircraft’s economics and greater space — it is 20 percent more efficient per seat than the industry’s long-time benchmark the 777-300ER and its cabin is wider with bigger windows.The Boeing 777X combines the best features of the current 777 with a longer fuselage, new engine and the composite wing design from the Boeing 787.Other airlines that have ordered the 777X are Lufthansa, Etihad Airways, Qatar Airways, Singapore Airlines, Cathay Pacific Airways, All Nippon Airlines and last week British Airways.Downunder Qantas and Air New Zealand are also evaluating the 777X along with its arch-rival the A350-1000.Qantas’s competition, called “Project Sunrise” demands Sydney to London non-stop capability with 300 passengers.Both Airbus and Boeing say they can meet the airline’s demands or “close to it.”Qantas plans to add underfloor bunks to the winner of its competition because on ultra-long-haul flights the aircraft will carry virtually no cargo, just passenger’s bags.last_img read more

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Arkansas ~ Corporate, Personal Income Taxes: Bill Would Update IRC Conformity for Depreciation

first_imgCCH Tax Day ReportThe Arkansas State Legislature has passed a bill that would, if enacted, update the Internal Revenue Code conformity for corporate and personal income tax purposes for depreciation. The bill would adopt IRC §§167 and 168(a)-(j) as in effect on January 1, 2017 (currently, January 1, 2015), for property purchased in tax years beginning after 2014. The bill would be effective for tax years beginning on or after January 1, 2015. Also, the bill would update the IRC conformity date for other code sections.hb1390introducedH.B. 1390, as introduced by the Arkansas House of Representatives on January 30, 2017.last_img read more

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Pay for Cybersecurity Jobs is on the Rise

first_imgA recent report from Dice.com shows how tech security jobs are far outpacing their IT counterparts.  It is part of a bigger trend as we see demand outstrip supply for cybersecurity professionals.  The cost of hiring or retaining talent continues to climb as organizations struggle in a market with depleted quantities of quality resources.  In highest demand are the security leaders, managers, and skilled engineers.  These roles are the anchors to a healthy security organization and critical for success.  They provide the mentorship, direction, expert guidance, and skills necessary to deliver against challenging tech obstacles, meeting the expectations of concerned executives, and countering the acts of creative cyber opponents.The rise in salaries should come as no surprise.  Security experts have been predicting this for some time and there is not likely any relief for at least a few years.  The increase in compensation is a result of a hiring pool which is basically dry and demand for security capabilities continues to rise quickly.  The need for cybersecurity is growing in almost all industries, as attacks, breaches, and regulations continue to rise.  Some estimates predict a deficit of over a million computer security jobs by the end of 2020.  This is effectively driving up the salaries.It is great news for the professionals already in the field.  Job security is at an all-time high.  It is commonplace for top and even medium tier talent to be pursued with enticements to change employers.  They are being lured with bigger paychecks and companies are defensively responding with improved compensation to retain the talent they have.  Else they will be in the unfavorable position of themselves trying to attract resources in a very competitive environment.Human Resource departments can help by staying on top of competitive salary reviews for current security professionals to insure compensation is at the right level to retain talent.  In a presentation to a Chief Human Resources organization last year, I outlined a number of different areas where HR can play an important role in cybersecurity, including overcoming the challenges of hiring of new talent.  HR should be prepared to have candid discussions with managers asking to hire new security staff, as the market price may be misaligned to budgets, compensation disparity could be disruptive to current staffing expectations, and it may take an unusually long time to successfully fill a role.This is also a great opportunity for higher education institutions to retool and prepare the next generation of security pro’s to fill the needs of the industry.  In May, I spoke at the International Cyber Education Workshop, hosted at Georgia Tech in Atlanta, where educators from top academic institutions were working together to figure out how to upgrade their programs to best prepare their cybersecurity graduates to take management and technical leadership roles in the industry.  Additionally, I see a great direction set by the Cyber Education Project (CEP) initiative, which is a diverse group of computing professionals representing academic institutions and professional societies developing undergraduate curriculum guidelines and a case for accreditation for educational programs in the “Cyber Sciences”.  Education programs are the key to increasing the capabilities and numbers of professionals entering the field.Until the supply of security professionals can come close to meeting demands, the salaries will continue to rise.  Where deficits in hiring quality staff exist, the risks of loss will remain elevated, reinforcing even greater demand.  It is a vicious circle and the only way to break free is with more security talent in the field.Matthew Rosenquist is a Cybersecurity Strategist at Intel, an Advisory Board Member of the Graduate Professional Studies for Brandis University, and contributor to the Industry Advisory Board of the Cyber Education Project organizationTwitter: @Matt_RosenquistIT Peer Network: My Previous PostsLinkedIn: http://linkedin.com/in/matthewrosenquistlast_img read more

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Interactive play Far From The Heart challenges teens to stop sexual assault

first_img Facebook Twitter Advertisement Advertisement Advertisement In one early scene, a young man becomes angry with his girlfriend’s new dress because he thinks it’s too revealing, and tries to force her to cover up.“It’s a very difficult scene, the girl is hurt, and the audience can stop it at any point and can come up and change things,” said Joan Chandler, artistic director of the Ontario theatre company Sheatre.READ MOREcenter_img An interactive theatre production is teaching audiences how to prevent sexual assault by asking the audience to intervene.Far From the Heart depicts a series of scenes taking place over the course of an evening that lead up to a sexual assault. After running through the performance once, the actors start again from the beginning.The second time, members of the audience are encouraged to stop the action and get onstage, either intervening as a bystander, or even replacing the other actors onstage to try a different approach. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Login/Register With: The interactive play Far From the Heart is coming to Sudbury, Ont. this weekend. The actors play out the events leading up to a sexual assault. Then the audience helps change the outcome when scenes are repeated. (Supplied)last_img read more

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Ian Campeau and wife Justine talk about what turned them to medicinal

first_imgAnnette FrancisAPTN NewsJustine Campeau enjoys spending time in her garden.After a life-altering experience, she and her husband, former A Tribe Called Red member Ian Campeau, aspired to be closer to the land.They bought a farm outside Ottawa three years ago.“I was twenty-five and I was breastfeeding my baby and I found a lump and it turned out to be stage three breast cancer and which is pretty spooky,” she said. “I didn’t have a gene mutation or any real indication, they don’t really know why I got it and it was intense.”Justine had to fight for her life.After a mastectomy, she was left to deal with nerve damage and pain.“My doctors gave me all kinds of pills and some of them are really scary, we went through a lot, trying all of them and in the end, it ended up being a really intense opioid that I used, which was just ruining my happiness being on it,” she said. “It makes you like a wet blanket and the pains not there but you’re dizzy and you’re sleepy.”That’s when they turned to [email protected]@aptnafrancislast_img read more

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Yankees Joe Giradi Managing In Wake of Fathers Death

New York Yankees manager Joe Girardi plans to continue working, including Thursday night’s Game 4 of the American League Division Playoffs, despite the recent death of his father, Jerry, earlier in the day.Jerry Girardi had been suffering from Alzheimer’s disease for several years, living in an assisted-care facility in Metamora, Ill. He was 81.Girardi’s father passed away on Saturday.  Girardi did not share that news with he public, however. He learned of his father’s death during the Yankees’ trip to Baltimore, but he elected to stay with the team and manage the remainder of the series.“I didn’t really want to talk about it,” Girardi said. “I didn’t want to take away from what we were trying to do here, because I know my dad wouldn’t. The one thing my parents always taught me was, finish the job at hand.“It’s been somewhat difficult, but because I didn’t really have to talk about it, it was probably easier.”Girardi would visit his father a couple times each baseball season, usually taking advantage of an off-day surrounding a Yankees series in Chicago or the Midwest. His last visit with his father came in August, on an off-day between the Yankees’ series in Chicago and Cleveland.Girardi recalled the moment he informed his father that he had made the Cubs’ opening day roster in 1989 as one of his favorite memories. Giving his father his 1996 Yankees World Series ring was another.“Huge Cubs fan, loved the other sports, loved basketball, played a year at Bradley,” Girardi said. “We played in the backyard. He was tough on me when we played basketball. I mean, he’d knock me down. He taught me about how to get back up.”Girardi said he hadn’t told any of his players about his father’s death. He planned to inform them this weekend, ideally to tell them he would miss Monday’s workout between Games 2 and 3 of the ALCS.“I feel sorry for him. I know this is very tough,” Robinson Cano said. “I know he’s a family guy; you always see his kids and his wife around. He always says family comes first. Hopefully we can win his game for him tonight.”Jerry Girardi was born on May 5, 1931, and married Angela Perino in 1959 in Tampico, Ill. The couple had five children: John, George, Maria, Joe and Jerry. Girardi is also survived by six grandchildren. His wife, Angela, passed away in 1984.Girardi served his country in the United States Air Force during the Korean War. Later he worked in construction sales for National Gypsum Company, and he also worked as a bricklayer. read more

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