上海千花mm自荐

The good life…

first_img…and land rightsYour Eyewitness is enjoying these Land CoI hearings. It’s our closest equivalent to those American reality shows that prove real life is always stranger than fiction. Are we going to have our own dashing Kardashians?!And the claims!! From what he’s hearing, your Eyewitness is now certain this land of ours is actually the “Holy Land”.The language stirs Sunday school memories of the promise God made to His people in unequivocal language: “for all the land which you see, I will give it to you and to your descendants forever.” And just because He knows the human eye can’t see very far because of the curvature of the Earth and all that, God offered some even more explicit instructions on the right to land: “Arise, walk through the land in the length of it and in the breadth of it; for I will give it unto thee.”But evidently to hedge their bets against those who may not have heard the booming voice from on high, it would appear some of the claimants to land are using Karl Marx’s “labour theory of value”. Meaning those who provide labour to produce something should actually own those things. So one fella said if Africans cleared and “made ready” 15,000 square miles of Guyana, they automatically own that much land. Sweat equity?Now your Eyewitness can just hear those whites from up north say what about all their capital and managerial expertise; and marketing and such-like was also labour. How much of Guyana should they claim? But on the application of the labour theory of value approach, your eyewitness has some questions on some of the figures thrown out. Like the “2,176 miles of sea and river defence” claimed to’ve been constructed.Isn’t this stretching matters a tad? After all, even though he didn’t pay too much attention to all that knowledge doled out in primary school, isn’t the entire Atlantic Coast – from Charity to, say, 64 Village, where the Corentyne begins,  around 200 miles? So were there then almost 2000 MILES of RIVER defences? And here your Eyewitness thought the Dutch originally established their sugar plantations up river because the land there was already high and not in need of “defences”, as with the mangroved coast.Your Eyewitness is also wondering about that figure of 473,000 Africans dying to clear 15,000 sq. miles of bush so that all of us could live the good life we’re enjoying presently. He understands this is the number arrived at when the 100,000 slaves at Emancipation is subtracted from total slaves shipped in.But wouldn’t they have died in any case – albeit not so quickly?…with health careOur Ministers are obviously working themselves to the bone and it’s taking a terrible toll on them. But they aren’t ones to give up, are they? Not our worthies!! You remember they took a tremendous cut in salary when they chose to get into public service – and that AFTER their 100% salary increase – don’t you?Those heavily tinted new SUVs, outriders to clear their way through traffic, gardeners, $500,000 monthly rentals, haven’t been able to lessen the toll of frequently being forced to jet off in first class to Texas, or Europe etc. But some bellyachers refuse to appreciate the sacrifices made by our stalwarts in Government. Take this ex-Minister Ramsammy, who balked at some Minister jetting off to Ireland to get medical treatment!Where else but Ireland – which had a decade of stress induced by their murderous IRA – could a stressed out Guyanese Minister be treated? GHPC? Ha!! No Valium there!!And, of course, the Ministers are paying a portion of their new health insurance like the rest of us!!…for female security guards?Did your Eyewitness hear right? No more geriatrics for “guard” service? No more females for night service? Increase the princely minimum wage of $2040/daily?Who do these guards think they are? Ministers?last_img read more

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NFL Week 9 Elo Ratings And Playoff Odds

Unlike the previous week, when three of the top five teams in our Elo ratings lost, Week 8 of the NFL season was a good time for the elite. The No. 4 San Francisco 49ers were idle, but the top 3 teams in Elo won, headlined by the Denver Broncos beating the San Diego Chargers by 14 to close in on the majestic 1700-point Elo barrier (a distinction last held by an NFL team when the Seattle Seahawks were putting the finishing touches on their Super Bowl rout of the Broncos in February).It was not, however, a pleasant week for the next-highest tier: the good-but-not-great teams. Among Nos. 5 to 11 in last week’s edition of the Elo ratings, only the No. 8 Arizona Cardinals won. The rest were all tripped up, with the Dallas Cowboys, Indianapolis Colts and Green Bay Packers each seeing their ratings decline in excess of 25 points. (Remember, every 25 points of Elo is worth a point in the predicted point spread — so they each lost more than a point per game of future margin-of-victory potential last week.)But out of that group of Week 8 losers (Dallas, Indianapolis, San Diego, Green Bay, the Baltimore Ravens and the Philadelphia Eagles), four teams — the Chargers, Ravens, Packers and Eagles — were not even favored by Elo to win going into the week. All four were on the road. Philadelphia and San Diego had the added misfortune of facing teams ranked ahead of them. That’s why, with the exception of the Packers (who lost to New Orleans by three touchdowns), the ratings damage to those not-quite-elite teams was relatively minimal despite the losses.Dallas and Indianapolis had no such excuses, though. The Colts’ defense was decimated by Ben Roethlisberger and the Pittsburgh Steelers, contributing to a 31-point drop in Indianapolis’s Elo rating. And the Cowboys lost to Washington as 12.5-point home favorites, leading to a 28-point Elo decline that allowed both Arizona and San Diego (in a loss!) to pass them in this week’s rankings.The Cowboys were of special interest because they’d been so hot going into the Monday-night flop against Washington. Since the beginning of the season, no team had added more Elo points than Dallas, who started the year with a 1496 mark but sat at 1608 before Monday’s game. Although it would have been difficult to foresee a loss to such a lowly squad (Elo said the Cowboys had an 86 percent probability of beating Washington), I wondered whether it shouldn’t have been overly surprising to see some regression to the mean in Dallas’s future, given its meteoric rise.But based on a sample going back to 1978, there’s practically no relationship between the Elo gains made by a team through seven weeks and the change in its rating from that point until the end of the regular season. In other words, we shouldn’t have expected the Cowboys’ rating to bounce back toward their preseason form because our Elo implementation is avoiding autocorrelation properly — meaning that a team’s current rating should also be its expected rating over the remainder of the season.At any rate, Dallas’s upset loss had real implications for the NFC East derby. Despite the Eagles’ loss, the Cowboys’ odds of winning the division dropped from 66 percent to 53 percent. Philadelphia’s chances jumped from 33 percent to 42 percent. Meanwhile, both teams lost ground in the wild card race — Dallas’s odds fell by 2 percentage points, and the Eagles’ chances dropped by 14 percentage points, more than any other team in the league. Much of that lost wild-card probability was soaked up by the NFC West, where Arizona, Seattle and San Francisco’s chances increased by a combined 22 percentage points.Here are the current playoff odds for all NFL teams:In terms of playoff probability, the real losers of Week 8 were the Ravens. Although the Elo-rating damage incurred by their 27-24 loss to Cincinnati was slight — they actually improved by one slot in this week’s rankings because Indianapolis was docked so much for its loss to Pittsburgh — their playoff chances dropped by 18 percentage points, the largest decline sustained by any team. Almost all of that was due to decreased odds of winning the AFC North. Concurrently, the Steelers’ chances of winning the division improved by 14 percentage points. With three teams locked in with division-win probabilities between 28 and 35 percent, the AFC North is the most wide-open division thus far.The North also contains three teams whose chances of making the playoffs range from 49 to 57 percent after adding in the wild card. But whichever of those teams doesn’t win the division will be in for a tough battle with Kansas City and San Diego for wild card slots. According to our simulations, there’s better than an 84 percent probability that at least one AFC wild card will come out of either the North or West divisions.Meanwhile, on the other side of the conference aisle, the New Orleans Saints’ victory over Green Bay went a long way toward carving out their path to the playoffs — one that almost exclusively relies on winning the NFC South. Projected to produce (by far) the losingest division winner in the NFC, the South’s teams have practically no chance of contending for a wild card. That honor could instead go to the two teams atop the NFC East (Dallas and Philadelphia) or their counterparts in the North (Green Bay and the Detroit Lions), though it looks more likely that at least one (if not two) of the West’s three big guns — Arizona, Seattle and San Francisco — will capture wild card berths in the NFC.Elo point spreadsRecord against point spread: 57-57-3 (8-7 in Week 8)Straight-up record: 85-35-1 (11-4 in Week 7)We wouldn’t advise betting with the Elo ratings above. (They have a perfectly .500 record against the spread on the 2014 season so far, and that mark wouldn’t be good enough to beat the house after taking into account the vigorish.) But they are performing well this season in terms of straight-up predictions, correctly pegging the winners more than 70 percent of the time.This week, there are a number of small disparities between Vegas’s lines and those predicted by Elo, but perhaps the most interesting involves the week’s marquee matchup: New England vs. Denver. The annual Brady-Manning showdown always draws its share of attention, but this edition pits our rankings’ Nos. 1 and 2 teams — essentially the Elo version of a BCS championship game. The Elo ratings consider the Patriots to be ever-so-slight favorites, while Vegas lists the Broncos as favored by a field goal. It’s not clear precisely what is driving the difference, although the history of our generation’s defining quarterback rivalry would seem to suggest intangible considerations tend to break in the direction of Brady and the Patriots.CORRECTION (Oct. 29, 11:01 a.m.): A previous version of this article listed the incorrect Elo ratings for visiting teams in the Elo point spread chart. It also incorrectly said the top two teams in the NFC North are the Green Bay Packers and the Chicago Bears. They are Green Bay and the Detroit Lions. read more

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Nathan Fletcher on federal lawsuit over Californias sanctuary city laws

first_img 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsThe State of California is being sued by the federal government for its sanctuary laws and several California cities have come out in support of the lawsuit.County Supervisor Candidate Nathan Fletcher disagrees with the lawsuit and says it is important to support San Diego immigration officials. Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter KUSI Newsroom, KUSI Newsroom Nathan Fletcher on federal lawsuit over California’s sanctuary city laws March 30, 2018 Posted: March 30, 2018last_img read more

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Conservation Group Air Force Announce Comprehensive Plan to Protect Buckley AFB

first_img Dan Cohen AUTHOR Officials on Wednesday announced that 124 acres adjacent to Buckley Air Force Base have been permanently protected from commercial development, the first of a series of land conservation efforts designed to protect the installation located outside of Denver from development and create a protected corridor for parks, trails and wildlife habitat.To limit development immediately adjacent to the base’s fence line, the Trust for Public Land — the installation’s partner in the Buckley AFB Compatible Use Buffer Project — will acquire key lands surrounding Buckley from willing sellers to create an open space buffer, reported 460th Space Wing Public Affairs.“The city of Aurora has been paying attention to what has been happening around Buckley literally for decades,” said Aurora Mayor Steve Hogan, reported the Denver Post.In addition to ensuring military operations and training can continue without affecting local residents, the project will create “great recreational amenities,” said Hillary Merritt, project manager for the Trust for Public Land. “And, the project will preserve and connect wildlife habitat in this rapidly growing part of the metro area,” Merritt said.DOD’s Readiness and Environmental Protection Integration (REPI) program and a Colorado Department of Military and Veterans Affairs program are providing funding for the initiative.“This is key to the future of the base and the continued viability of our air and space missions,” said Col John Wagner, installation commander and commander of the 460th Space Wing. “With it, our aircraft will continue to fly and our ground stations will talk to our spacecraft far into the future, and we’ll have a recreational trail system around the installation that supports our community,” Wagner said.The city of Aurora now owns all but 10 acres of the 124-acre tract; that piece was transferred to the Air Force and will be included in Buckley’s clear zone. A conservation easement that precludes development is held by Arapahoe County and the United States. The property’s acquisition means the installation finally controls the last privately owned segment of the runway’s clear zone, according to the story.Negotiations to acquire other properties adjacent to the base are ongoing, according to the Trust for Public Land. Additional acquisitions are expected to be announced in the months ahead.last_img read more

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