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Professionals with working class backgrounds are being hit by a class earnings penalty, warns government’s social mobility tsar

Thursday 26 January 2017 6:00 am Rebecca Smith Share whatsapp whatsapp The report, compiled by academics from the LSE and UCL using data from the UK Labour Force Survey, examined access to the professions and the impact of socio-economic background on earnings.Read more: We won’t close the City’s gender pay gap without tackling family pressuresIt found that access to professions is still dominated by those from more privileged backgrounds, and when those from working class backgrounds do secure a professional career, they face an earnings penalty.Dr Sam Friedman, from the LSE said of the pay gap within the professions: “There are a number of reasons for this such as higher educational attainment among the privileged. But even when these factors are taken into account, this gap remains significant.”When the individuals in question have the same education attainment, role and experience, the report found those from poorer backgrounds are paid an average of £2,242, or seven per cent, less. by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeMisterStoryWoman Files For Divorce After Seeing This Photo – Can You See Why?MisterStoryUnify Health LabsRandy Jackson: This 3 Minute Routine Transformed My HealthUnify Health LabsAtlantic MirrorA Kilimanjaro Discovery Has Proved This About The BibleAtlantic MirrorWarped SpeedCan You Name More State Capitals Than A 5th Grader? Find Out Now!Warped SpeedSwift VerdictChrissy Metz, 39, Shows Off Massive Weight Loss In Fierce New PhotoSwift VerdictFinanceChatterViewers Had To Look Away When This Happened On Live TVFinanceChatterLiver Health1 Bite of This Melts Belly And Arm Fat (Take Before Bed)Liver HealthNoteableyJulia Robert’s Daughter Turns 16 And Looks Just Like Her MomNoteableyMaternity WeekAfter Céline Dion’s Major Weight Loss, She Confirms What We Suspected All AlongMaternity Week Professionals with working class backgrounds are being hit by a class earnings penalty, warns government’s social mobility tsar Professionals from working class backgrounds are being punished by a “class pay gap”, according to new research from the government’s Social Mobility Commission.They are paid an average of 17 per cent less (£6,800) each year, than colleagues from more affluent backgrounds. Reasons given as to why those from working class backgrounds may not achieve the same earnings or levels of success were that they may be less likely to ask for pay rises or not have the same access to networks.Read more: Most people still identify as working classThe Rt. Hon Alan Milburn, chair of the Social Mobility Commission, said the research provided “powerful new evidence that Britain remains a deeply elitist society”.“Too many people from working class backgrounds not only face barriers getting into the professions, but also barriers to getting on,” he said. “Many professional firms are doing excellent work to open their doors to people from all backgrounds, but this research suggests much more needs to be done to ensure that Britain is a place where everyone has an equal chance of success regardless of where they have come from.” read more

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Founders not scroungers: There’s a business case for welcoming refugees

From Michael Marks of Marks & Spencer and Rashmi Thakrar of Tilda Rice, to Adnan Medjedovic and Edin Basic, two exiled Bosnians who founded thriving UK gourmet pizza chain Firezza, examples abound of refugees setting up successful companies in this country. As the government debates and articulates its policies towards refugees, it would do well to remember this fact.Instead of seeing refugees as a one-way burden on the economy and the state, we need a different vision that celebrates their potential to improve and rejuvenate our societies – as entrepreneurs or otherwise. This isn’t wishful thinking – the evidence supports it – but it will require drawing attention to inspirational success stories, reframing the negative narrative around refugees, and supporting initiatives that help fulfil their potential. Thursday 16 February 2017 4:59 am Founders not scroungers: There’s a business case for welcoming refugees Maximilian Yoshioka As the legal battle rages on around Donald Trump’s chaotic travel ban and moratorium on refugees, you could be forgiven for thinking that the West faces an existential threat unparalleled in its history.Yet as politicians rush to placate and at times inflate public fears about the negative impact of refugees on jobs, public services and national security, a growing body of research strongly suggests that refugees – far from being passive welfare claimants – create businesses and jobs wherever they go. Instead of accelerating the West’s economic decline, refugees might just be a part of the solution. Share Read more: Starbucks to hire 10,000 refugees in response to Trump’s Muslim travel banDespite many having had successful careers back home, refugees often struggle to get hired in the formal economy. While the reasons vary – from language barriers, unrecognised qualifications and extended unemployment during the asylum period, to uncertainty around working rights and even blatant prejudice – the outcome is the same: unemployment and, frequently, destitution. Of those refugees that do find jobs, over half feel overqualified for them.In response to this frustrating underutilisation of skills, talent and experience, some see entrepreneurship as the solution. Unlike a traditional job, being an entrepreneur enables a refugee to circumvent the hiring process and pursue a passion or idea on its own merits.As a vehicle of social mobility less determined by social standing or cultural origin, entrepreneurship is often an ideal career path for individuals without any roots or connections in their new country. The resilience a person acquires in the process of leaving his or her home, livelihood and culture may also prepare them for the challenges of starting and running a new venture.Read more: This legendary investor is committing $500m to help the refugee crisis Ad Unmute by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeFresh-Story.comThe List Of World’s Most Deadliest SnakesFresh-Story.comUndoVitaminewsRanked: The Prettiest Women – In The WorldVitaminewsUndoIdolatorGreat Songs That Artists Are Now Embarrassed OfIdolatorUndoMiaw StoreSome acts from your cat may be a sign for alarm. Get to know it nowMiaw StoreUndoDo It HousesDon’t Throw These Away! Do This InsteadDo It HousesUndoHealthline: Medical information and health advice15 Evening Habits that are Definitely Bad for Night’s SleepHealthline: Medical information and health adviceUndoHome Foundation Repair | Search AdsFoundation Repair? May Now Be Even More Affordable in Scottsdale. Check optionsHome Foundation Repair | Search AdsUndocarammelloThese Are the World’s Most Delicious Street Foods in the World – CarammellocarammelloUndoHappy Pumpkin10 Delicious Freezer Meal Recipes to Dump into the Slow Cooker – Happy PumpkinHappy PumpkinUndo whatsapp Forced to flee from violence and persecution, countries accept refugees for humanitarian reasons. Nevertheless, there is a convincing economic rationale for welcoming them with open arms.Read more: Taking Trump literally: The President is incompetent or malevolent or bothThroughout history, people fleeing destruction and persecution have contributed hugely to their adoptive countries. From the Huguenots who arrived in England in the seventeenth century bringing with them expertise in textiles, watchmaking, carpentry and science, to the Jewish diaspora that escaped war-engulfed Europe to America’s great benefit, and the Cuban refugees that have become inseparable from Miami’s culinary and cultural identity, nations have long reaped the benefits of harbouring those with no place else to go.Fast forward to today, a succession of devastating wars in the Middle East has led millions to flee in search of refuge, mostly to other countries in the region, but also to Europe and North America. Yet despite both academic research and the historical record suggesting otherwise, voters in many developed countries are alarmed by what they see as an influx of welfare scroungers or, worse, possible terrorists. This has led to a political reluctance to take in greater numbers, and has meant that countries are missing out on a potentially dramatic boost to their cultural and economic prosperity.This is not to say that refugees do not face a whole host of challenges once they arrive in their host countries. While many bring valuable skills and education – particularly true of the current wave of Syrian asylum seekers – finding regular employment poses substantial difficulties. Take Turkey, where over the past five years Syrian refugees have set up over 4,000 businesses, bringing with them $220m in capital and making up over a quarter of all new foreign-owned firms established annually.Or consider pioneering research carried out in Uganda by Oxford University professor Alexander Betts, who found that the presence of refugees from neighbouring countries dramatically boosted local purchasing power, employment and human capital. In the capital city of Kampala, 21 per cent of refugees run businesses that employ other people.Data from the Australian Bureau of Statistics, meanwhile, shows that refugees make twice as much money from their own businesses as people arriving on skilled and family visas. And a recent feature in the Economist highlights some of the successful businesses started by refugee arrivals in Germany.Read more: Failure to reform refugee laws risks the unravelling of liberal democracyHere in the UK, official government data reveals that refugees are the most likely to be self-employed of all migrant groups (with migrants as a whole more likely to be entrepreneurs than the native-born). This corroborates recent research by the Centre for Entrepreneurs which found that foreign nationals start more companies per head than the UK-born. whatsapp More From Our Partners Police Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comMan on bail for murder arrested after pet tiger escapes Houston homethegrio.comAstounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.orgFans call out hypocrisy as Tebow returns to NFL while Kaepernick is still outthegrio.comBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgFort Bragg soldier accused of killing another servicewoman over exthegrio.comNative American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.orgColin Kaepernick to publish book on abolishing the policethegrio.comBiden received funds from top Russia lobbyist before Nord Stream 2 giveawaynypost.comPorsha Williams engaged to ex-husband of ‘RHOA’ co-star Falynn Guobadiathegrio.com980-foot skyscraper sways in China, prompting panic and evacuationsnypost.comLA news reporter doesn’t seem to recognize actor Mark Currythegrio.comInside Ashton Kutcher and Mila Kunis’ not-so-average farmhouse estatenypost.comKansas coach fired for using N-word toward Black playerthegrio.comKamala Harris keeps list of reporters who don’t ‘understand’ her: reportnypost.comA ProPublica investigation has caused outrage in the U.S. this weekvaluewalk.comFlorida woman allegedly crashes children’s birthday party, rapes teennypost.com read more

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British steelworkers vote in favour of Tata’s reforms to pensions

Ad Unmute by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeTip ParentsA Nurse Finds Out The Truth About Her HusbandTip ParentsUndoBrainSharperGwen Stefani’s Wedding Gown Turned HeadsBrainSharperUndoAuto carLook: Top 10 best small electric cars 2021 | AutocarAuto carUndoBIBAThings Are Different For William And Kate – Here’s What HappenedBIBAUndoCar NovelsRare Photos Of Diana – No. 9 Will Surprise YouCar NovelsUndogethsemanefellowshipministry.orgGethsemane Baptist Church – Striving for Spiritual Excellencegethsemanefellowshipministry.orgUndoHollywood-TaleRemember Her From ‘Dallas Series’? This Is Her At 71Hollywood-TaleUndoGout Symptoms | Search AdsGout Symptoms Your Doctor May Not Tell You AboutGout Symptoms | Search AdsUndoParentology20 Weirdest Baby Names 2021 & What They MeanParentologyUndo Mark Sands Steelworkers in three unions have voted in favour of proposals that will see their pensions benefits cut.The proposals will see Tata Steel pump £1bn into the sprawling Port Talbot steelworks in exchange for workers accepting changes to their pension schemes. “The government will play its role in supporting the steel industry to help deliver a sustainable future.”Read More: Government publishes steel requirements to 2020 in bid to boost industryAberavon MP Stephen Kinnock, whose constituency includes the Port Talbot steelworks, said the loss of the steelworks would have been “unimaginable”.“Tata must now uphold their pledge to retain the two blast furnaces in Port Talbot, avoid compulsory redundancies, placing the UK workforce on the same footing as their colleagues in the Netherlands, and bring forward the £1bn investment plan that will go a long way towards building the competitiveness and productivity of Port Talbot and the downstream sites.”If fulfilled, the package voted on today should secure the future for Port Talbot.” whatsapp More From Our Partners Colin Kaepernick to publish book on abolishing the policethegrio.comBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comA ProPublica investigation has caused outrage in the U.S. this weekvaluewalk.comNative American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.orgKansas coach fired for using N-word toward Black playerthegrio.comPolice Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgMan on bail for murder arrested after pet tiger escapes Houston homethegrio.comAstounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.org More than 70 per cent of the steelworker members of GMB, Community and Unite unions decided to accept a the creation of a “mirror” pension scheme that will result in reduced retirement benefits, with future payments linked to the consumer price index of inflation, rather than the faster rising retail price index.British Steel Pensions Scheme members will then be given the choice of switching over to the new scheme, with the small number of workers who would benefit more from protections offered by the Pensions Protection Fund able to opt out.Read More: British steel will “lurch from crisis to crisis” without action say MPsThe vote has been described as “make or break” for the future of the British steel industry, with observers questioning Tata’s commitment to the UK if it had been unable to secure reform.The future of the Port Talbot works have been in doubt for almost a year, with the Indian firm first revealing sale plans last march in the face of falling global steel prices.  Wednesday 15 February 2017 2:05 pm Share whatsapp British steelworkers vote in favour of Tata’s reforms to pensions That prompted then-business secretary Sajid Javid to step in, and offer government support for any buyer, before Tata later took the operation off the market in the aftermath of the summer’s Brexit vote, to explore a now-stalled joint-venture with Thyssenkrupp.Read More: Tata leadership race must show open mindRoy Rickhuss, general secretary Community, said: “Steelworkers have taken a tough decision and have shown they are determined to safeguard jobs and secure the long-term future of steelmaking.He added: “We now expect Tata to make good on their promises and deliver the investment plan for the whole of their steel business.”A spokesman for the government’s business, energy and industrial strategy department said: “It is testament to the commitment of its workforce that they are willing to work so constructively with the owners to secure the future of the plant. read more

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Two years on, and the Brexit debate is still dominated by the two extremes shouting at each other

first_imgNot every Leave voter punched the air when the referendum result came through, and not all Remain voters sunk to the floor with their heads in their hands.And yet, more than two years on from that dramatic night, the loudest voices in this debate are still the two extremes. Flick through the news channels and you’ll catch snippets of Labour’s Andrew Adonis demanding Brexit be stopped (and calling for a public inquiry into how it could have happened) along with glimpses of backbench Tories and hard-Brexit advocates telling us, implausibly, that a No Deal exit would be a walk in the park. whatsapp whatsapp Fortunately – better late than never – the newly formed Brexit Delivery Group, comprising of 60 Leave and Remain Tory MPs, will now be making this case. All power to them.As Hart wrote over the weekend, “we should bank what we can now, leave the EU in March and continue to grind away at the bits that fall short of expectation. That’s what we do in business every day and what has typified our relationship with the EU for more than 40 years.” The campaign for a second referendum is up and running – cloaked in the language of democracy but with a very clear purpose: to undo what democracy delivered in 2016. On the other side of the aisle, hardcore Brexiters are fumbling and stumbling in a last-ditch effort to present an alternative plan to the Prime Minister’s Chequers proposal.Everyone else (we could call them the squeezed middle) watches as the remnants of two campaigning sides continue to shout at each other, 27 months after one side lost and the other won. Narrowly. That slim margin of victory matters.As Leaver Dan Hannan has said, and as Remainer Tory MP Simon Hart now echoes, the referendum did not settle a debate; it exposed a divide. The task of Brexit, therefore, is as much about bringing the country back together as it is about extricating the UK from the European Union.A second referendum, whatever it’s called (“People’s Vote”) would generate fresh waves of uncertainty, amplify the voices of the two extremes and shatter the notion that voting matters. It is an idea that must be put to bed. Similarly, as Hart says, Brexit is a process – not an event.It will take time. It will involve compromise. It will not satisfy everyone. But it will happen, and those mounting a last stand against it – whether publicly or in secret – should direct their efforts, time and resources to the task of engineering an exit, a transition period and a good deal for our future relationship with the EU. Sunday 16 September 2018 7:07 pm Share Christian May Two years on, and the Brexit debate is still dominated by the two extremes shouting at each other More From Our Partners Astounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.orgPorsha Williams engaged to ex-husband of ‘RHOA’ co-star Falynn Guobadiathegrio.comBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgFans call out hypocrisy as Tebow returns to NFL while Kaepernick is still outthegrio.comPolice Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgKansas coach fired for using N-word toward Black playerthegrio.comRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comMan on bail for murder arrested after pet tiger escapes Houston homethegrio.comNative American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.orgA ProPublica investigation has caused outrage in the U.S. this weekvaluewalk.comUK teen died on school trip after teachers allegedly refused her pleasnypost.comLA news reporter doesn’t seem to recognize actor Mark Currythegrio.com980-foot skyscraper sways in China, prompting panic and evacuationsnypost.comFort Bragg soldier accused of killing another servicewoman over exthegrio.comInside Ashton Kutcher and Mila Kunis’ not-so-average farmhouse estatenypost.comColin Kaepernick to publish book on abolishing the policethegrio.comBiden received funds from top Russia lobbyist before Nord Stream 2 giveawaynypost.comFlorida woman allegedly crashes children’s birthday party, rapes teennypost.comlast_img read more

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Ex-Nissan chairman Carlos Ghosn claims innocence in Tokyo court appearance

first_imgTuesday 8 January 2019 8:33 am by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeBetterBe20 Stunning Female AthletesBetterBeMisterStoryWoman Files For Divorce After Seeing This Photo – Can You See Why?MisterStoryZen HeraldEllen Got A Little Too Personal With Blake Shelton, So He Said ThisZen HeraldFinance Wealth PostTom Selleck’s Daughter Is Probably The Prettiest Woman To Ever ExistFinance Wealth PostMoneyPailShe Was A Star, Now She Works In ScottsdaleMoneyPailTotal PastJohn Wick Stuntman Reveals The Truth About Keanu ReevesTotal PastNoteableyFaith Hill’s Daughter Is Probably The Prettiest Woman In The WorldNoteableymoneycougar.comDiana’s Butler Reveals Why Harry Really Married Meghanmoneycougar.comPaws ZillaLily From The AT&T Ads Is Causing A Stir For One ReasonPaws Zilla More From Our Partners Why people are finding dryer sheets in their mailboxesnypost.comRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comPolice Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgFlorida woman allegedly crashes children’s birthday party, rapes teennypost.comAstounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.orgUK teen died on school trip after teachers allegedly refused her pleasnypost.comNative American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.orgA ProPublica investigation has caused outrage in the U.S. this weekvaluewalk.comBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgSupermodel Anne Vyalitsyna claims income drop, pushes for child supportnypost.comKiller drone ‘hunted down a human target’ without being told tonypost.comI blew off Adam Sandler 22 years ago — and it’s my biggest regretnypost.comInside Ashton Kutcher and Mila Kunis’ not-so-average farmhouse estatenypost.comMatt Gaetz swindled by ‘malicious actors’ in $155K boat sale boondogglenypost.comBiden received funds from top Russia lobbyist before Nord Stream 2 giveawaynypost.comConnecticut man dies after crashing Harley into live bearnypost.com‘Neighbor from hell’ faces new charges after scaring off home buyersnypost.com980-foot skyscraper sways in China, prompting panic and evacuationsnypost.com Former Nissan chairman Carlos Ghosn told a court in Tokyo that he is innocent and has been wrongly accused of financial misconduct.Ghosn, who has been held in Japan since 19 November, has been accused of understating his income, transferring personal losses to Nissan and using company funds to pay a Saudi businessman for a personal favour. Jessica Clark whatsapp center_img whatsapp Today’s court hearing was requested by Ghosn’s lawyers and was held to explain the reason for his detention, which Judge Yuichi Tada said was due to flight risk and the possibility that he could conceal evidence.“I have been wrongly accused and unfairly detained based on meritless and unsubstantiated accusations,” Ghosn told the Tokyo District Court, Reuters reported.“Contrary to the accusations made by the prosecutors, I never received any compensation from Nissan that was not disclosed, nor did I ever enter into any binding contract with Nissan to be paid a fixed amount that was not disclosed,” Ghosn said.Ghosn’s legal team, headed by former prosecutor Motonari Otsuru, are expected to explain his defence at a press conference later in the day.The scandal has rocked the alliance between Renault, Nissan and Mitsubishi. While Nissan and Mitsubishi have ousted the executive, he remains chief executive and chairman of Renault.If found guilty, Ghosn could face 10 years in prison and a fine of up to ¥10m (£70,000). Tags: Trading Archive Share Ex-Nissan chairman Carlos Ghosn claims innocence in Tokyo court appearance last_img read more

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How to choose a provider for your Stocks and Shares Isa

first_imgThursday 14 February 2019 11:34 am whatsapp Ad Unmute by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeBetterBe20 Stunning Female AthletesBetterBeUndoMoneyPailShe Was A Star, Now She Works In ScottsdaleMoneyPailUndoNoteableyJulia Robert’s Daughter Turns 16 And Looks Just Like Her MomNoteableyUndoDaily FunnyFemale Athlete Fails You Can’t Look Away FromDaily FunnyUndoinvesting.comThe Military Spent $1 Billion On this New Vehicle, And Here’s The First Lookinvesting.comUndobonvoyaged.comTotal Jerks: These Stars Are Horrible People.bonvoyaged.comUndoMisterStoryWoman files for divorce after seeing this photoMisterStoryUndoBleacherBreaker4 Sisters Take The Same Picture For 40 Years. Don’t Cry When You See The Last One!BleacherBreakerUndoLiver Health1 Bite of This Melts Belly And Arm Fat (Take Before Bed)Liver HealthUndo Share Platforms can usually be divided into those with flat administration charges, and those that charge a percentage on holdings. So depending on your intention for the Isa, it pays to take care when deciding which provider to go for.For example, if you’re an active buyer and seller, it might be more cost-effective to choose a provider with a flat trading fee, otherwise your savings could be wiped out by hefty dealing charges. Reinvestment fees, transfer charges, and exit fees can also hammer you if you aren’t careful.So make sure you know the Isa inside out before using it as a platform to invest. If you’re trying to decide where is best to house your money, here is an overview of several Isa providers to help you get started.AJ Bell YouinvestThis platform has low administrative and dealing charges.For fund holdings, the annual administration charge is 0.25 per cent for the first £250,000. A 0.25 per cent annual administration charge, capped at £7.50 per quarter, is levied for non-fund holdings. Fund dealing costs are £1.50, and £9.95 for non-fund dealing. This falls to £4.95 if ten trades have occurred in the previous month.Watch out for the transfer- out charge though, which is £25 per holding.Alliance Trust SavingsInvestors pay £10 per month to have an ATS account, and there’s a flat charge of £9.99 per trade. Investors get four online trades per year included in the price of the administrative fee.Given the flat fee, this is a good option for frequent traders. However, be aware that dividend reinvestment will cost £5.Barclay’s Smart InvestorAdmin fees depend on the underlying investments – you’re charged 0.2 per cent a year for funds, and 0.1 per cent for everything else. The minimum charge is £4 per month, and is capped at £125. Online transaction costs also vary – £3 to buy and sell funds, and £6 for everything else. Automated regular investments cost £1, making this an attractive Isa for frequent buyers and sellers.Charles Stanley DirectThis platform has an annual admin fee of 0.35 per cent, which is waived every month if a trade is made.Fund dealing is free, but all others come in at £11.50, which isn’t exactly cheap.This provider is a good option for more active traders.FidelityThis provider has an 0.35 per cent annual service fee for an investment portfolio valued under £7,500 (the fee is capped at £45 if you don’t have a regular savings plan). How to choose a provider for your Stocks and Shares Isa Benedict SpenceBenedict Spence is a freelance writer. He is on Twitter @BenedictSpence Isas are a popular way for savers to squirrel away money. And given that these savings accounts are free from both capital gains and dividend tax, the Stocks and Shares Isa is particularly appealing to investors.With all that said, not all Isas are created equal, and charges can vary wildly across providers. whatsapp It costs £10 to buy and sell holdings, while regular transactions, including dividend reinvestment, costs £1.50 each time.Fidelity is definitely not the cheapest, but the platform offers a raft of information, top fund lists, and ideas for investors who want some guidance.Hargreaves LansdownLike Fidelity, Hargreaves Lansdown’s platform is simple to navigate and provides plenty of information, including a recommended fund list.Admin fees for its Stocks and Shares Isa are 0.45 per cent for the year, though shares and investment trusts are capped at £45. While fund dealing is free, buying or selling shares, investment trusts, corporate bonds, and ETFs will set you back £11.95 per trade, which, again, isn’t cheap – though the cost drops after 10 trades per month.The platform gives you the option of automatically reinvesting income from funds, but note that this comes with a one per cent charge of the trade value.Also watch out for the £25 transfer-out fee.While Hargreaves is ideal for people who want a helping hand, you’ll have to weigh this up with the higher costs.Interactive InvestorThis platform has an admin fee of £22.50 per quarter, but this money is returned to you in the form of trading credits. The platform charges £10 to buy or sell funds, shares, investment trusts or exchange-trade funds. So if you bought two funds, you would have £2.50 left to work with.Monthly reinvestment costs £1, making this a winner for frequent traders. And with the provider ditching its transfer-out fee last year, you can switch at no cost if you decide that it isn’t right for you.This is by no means an exhaustive list of platforms, but it should give you an idea of the range of options available in the market. More From Our Partners Matt Gaetz swindled by ‘malicious actors’ in $155K boat sale boondogglenypost.comNative American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.orgRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comAstounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.orgFlorida woman allegedly crashes children’s birthday party, rapes teennypost.comBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.org980-foot skyscraper sways in China, prompting panic and evacuationsnypost.comA ProPublica investigation has caused outrage in the U.S. this weekvaluewalk.comPolice Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.org Tags: Alliance Trust Company Hargreaves Lansdown Isas Taxlast_img read more

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Footage of Angela Merkel shaking sparks fresh concerns over health

first_imgRead more: European Commission launches antitrust probe into broadcom Share The speculation comes ahead of a weekend summit in Japan where world leaders will meet to discuss the future direction of the global economy. They added: “Everything is taking place as planned. The chancellor is well.” An aide offered Merkel a glass of water in today’s reception which she turned down. Footage of Angela Merkel shaking sparks fresh concerns over health A spokesperson for the chancellor told reporters today that she would set off as planned for the G20 summit in Japan at around noon today. Read more: US and China agree tentative trade truce ahead of G20 summit Merkel,64, blamed last week’s similar incident on dehydration, but Germannews organisationDPA said it was cool during the ceremony. Thursday 27 June 2019 12:54 pm Angela Merkel has been seen shaking for the second time in just over a week, sparking fresh concerns over the German chancellor’s health. whatsapp whatsapp Sebastian McCarthy It is the second time in eight days that the German leader has appeared ill, after appearing to shake while standing next to Ukraine President Volodymyr Zelensky in the heat last week. New footage appears to show Merkel trembling uncontrollably for roughly two minutes in a Berlin ceremony earlier today.last_img read more

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Admiral profits dented £33m by regulation change

first_img whatsapp Wednesday 14 August 2019 9:29 am The insurance sector has been highly critical of the Ogden rate changes since they were announced in July, and Admiral’s results begin to show what the impact of the change will be on the industry.  Admiral said the changes had cut its first-half profits by £33.m, and reported a pre-tax profit of £218m, a four per cent increase on the same period last year. Main image credit: Admiral Admiral announced a 5 per cent increase in its interim dividend, which rose to 63p per share.  The government changed the Ogden rate, which governs how much insurers pay to people seriously injured in car accidents, in July. The rate was raised to minus 0.25 per cent on 15 July, a lower rise than many in the industry had been hoping for. Tags: Admiral Group Insurance Car insurer Admiral has taken a £33.3m hit to its profits following the introduction of changes to how compensation for those injured in accidents is calculated. Anna Menin Read more: Insurers voice disappointment as UK changes personal injury discount rate More From Our Partners Native American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.org‘Neighbor from hell’ faces new charges after scaring off home buyersnypost.comA ProPublica investigation has caused outrage in the U.S. this weekvaluewalk.comBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comMatt Gaetz swindled by ‘malicious actors’ in $155K boat sale boondogglenypost.comAstounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.orgFlorida woman allegedly crashes children’s birthday party, rapes teennypost.comPolice Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgBiden received funds from top Russia lobbyist before Nord Stream 2 giveawaynypost.comFeds seized 18 devices from Rudy Giuliani and his employees in April raidnypost.comBill Gates reportedly hoped Jeffrey Epstein would help him win a Nobelnypost.comMark Eaton, former NBA All-Star, dead at 64nypost.comI blew off Adam Sandler 22 years ago — and it’s my biggest regretnypost.comInside Ashton Kutcher and Mila Kunis’ not-so-average farmhouse estatenypost.comKiller drone ‘hunted down a human target’ without being told tonypost.comWhy people are finding dryer sheets in their mailboxesnypost.comUK teen died on school trip after teachers allegedly refused her pleasnypost.com Earnings per share (EPS) rose a modest 2 per cent to 63p, but Admiral said the changed Ogden rate had reduced EPS by 10p. The figurescenter_img Huw Evans, head of the Association of British Insurers, said at the time that the change was “a bad outcome for insurance customers and taxpayers that will add costs rather than save customers money”. Share Why it’s interesting What Admiral said The insurer said  it expects the total impact of the new Ogden rate on full-year profits to be approximately £50-60m.  Chief executive David Stevens said the group’s results were “a bit dull”, cautioning: “If it’s a can’t-put-down, read-in-one-go page-turner that you’re after, then I’m afraid our half-year results don’t fit the bill.” Insurers, who pay out less as a lump sum when the rate is higher, had called for the level to be raised after it was slashed in 2017 from 2.5 per cent to minus 0.75 per cent.  “Low growth in UK Motor policy count reflects a consciously reduced competitiveness, as we price rationally in the face of any rising claims costs across the market as a whole,” Stevens added. Stevens also highlighted Admiral’s success in Europe, calling it “the racier continental novella” that could get “potentially lost amidst the worthy tome that is the UK”.  Customer numbers rose 8 per cent to 6.74 million, driven by a 21 per cent increase in international car insurance customers to 1.36 million by the end of the first half. Admiral profits dented £33m by insurance regulation change Admiral’s share price was up 4.58 per cent in morning trading to 2,125p. Nevertheless, Stevens found some things to be enthusiastic about. “Profit growth, even if modest, is more exciting considering the £33 million Ogden headwind,” he said. whatsapplast_img read more

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How to end the injustice of the skewed university degree system

first_img Opinion John PenroseJohn Penrose is Conservative MP for Weston Super Mare. No one else could take them and, if you got an A grade in, for example, chemistry, it was worth more than an A grade in the same subject from any other exam board. whatsapp A City and Guilds qualification in plumbing is worth the same to a student or a potential employer, no matter which further education college you studied at. A particular grade at A-level or GCSE English is worth the same whether you went to school in Truro or Tadcaster.  Pretty soon, there would be league tables showing which university courses added the most value during the three years of study, and which ones added least. Students would beat a path to the doors of those with the best teaching, and avoid the worst like the plague. Poor performers would have to pull their socks up, and the good ones would have nothing to fear. City A.M.’s opinion pages are a place for thought-provoking views and debate. These views are not necessarily shared by City A.M. How to end the injustice of the skewed university degree system It would be hideously unfair. Etonians would have a huge, inbuilt advantage in everything, from getting into the best universities to applying for jobs. It wouldn’t matter how hard you worked, how clever you were, or how well you performed in your exams. If you didn’t go to Eton, your life chances simply wouldn’t be as good.  How can it be fair that older institutions with long-established reputations are automatically assumed to be better than new ones, whether their teaching and courses deserve it or not? Main image credit: Getty All those recurring stories about there not being enough clever working-class or ethnic minority students at posh old universities would vanish. This system holds the seeds of an answer across the board: if every university pledged to make qualifications from similar courses equal, so a 2:1 in English was worth the same no matter where students studied, it would be revolutionary. For every other serious qualification in the UK, the same grades in the same subjects mean the same things.  It would make Britain a far fairer place: a more socially-just, meritocratic, mobile society, where someone who works hard and succeeds has the same life chances whether their father is a duke or a doorman. And directly-comparable grades would give a jolt of adrenaline to Britain’s universities as well.  In other words, we’d be richer as well as happier, and it wouldn’t cost taxpayers a bean. How many other ideas can say that?center_img Students would feel the effects first. Anyone who fluffed their A-levels and didn’t get into their first choice of university would have a second chance; they could still fulfil their potential by getting an equally good qualification from somewhere else.  Share In today’s global knowledge economy, enabling everyone to make the most of their talents doesn’t just help people live more fulfilled lives. It fuels the engines of Britain’s wealth and growth too.  For the first time, everyone would be able to compare the A-level grades which students had when they arrived with the quality of degree they’d earned when they left.  LONDON, ENGLAND – JULY 15: Students stand in a fountain ahead of their graduation ceremony at the Royal Festival Hall on July 15, 2014 in London, England. Students of the London College of Fashion, Management and Science and Media and Communication attended their graduation ceremony at the Royal Festival Hall today. (Photo by Dan Kitwood/Getty Images) There are a few honourable exceptions, like medical subjects, which standardise their grades so a degree is worth the same from everywhere.  Even better, universities would have a much stronger incentive to find and admit students with undiscovered talents. Bright students who’d got poor grades because they were ill on exam day, or had problems at home, or came from a disadvantaged background, would be like gold dust for admissions staff looking to vault up the value-added rankings.  Wednesday 4 September 2019 4:07 am Thank goodness that sort of thing doesn’t happen today in the real world, right? But it does. Right here in modern Britain, universities are doing precisely that. Instead of Eton awarding special A-levels that no one else can match, Oxford and Cambridge do it for degrees instead. But a first in English from Oxford or Cambridge isn’t worth the same as one from most former polytechnics. Imagine a world where Eton awarded its own A-levels. whatsapp by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeDaily FunnyFemale Athlete Fails You Can’t Look Away FromDaily FunnyFinanceChatterViewers Had To Look Away When This Happened On Live TVFinanceChatterNoteableyJulia Robert’s Daughter Turns 16 And Looks Just Like Her MomNoteableyPast Factory4 Sisters Take The Same Picture For 40 Years. Don’t Cry When You See The Last One!Past Factoryzenherald.comDolly Finally Took Off Her Wig, Fans Gaspedzenherald.comMisterStoryWoman files for divorce after seeing this photoMisterStoryYourDailyLamaHe Used To Be Handsome In 80s Now It’s Hard To Look At HimYourDailyLamabonvoyaged.comThese Celebs Are Complete Jerks In Real Life.bonvoyaged.comPost Fun25 Worst Movies Ever, According To Rotten TomatoesPost Funlast_img read more

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Order, order: The race is on to replace John Bercow

first_imgParties will have to calculate carefully whether losing a seat is worth it to take over the chair. That the position alternates between the two main parties is a newish innovation, broken more often than it is honoured. Do not expect it hold this time round.  Order, order: The race is on to replace John Bercow The new speaker will not only have to make these decisions, but also set the tone for how they are made – deciding whether the role is further politicised or is returned to the esteemed neutrality it once had.  The speaker resigns from their party on appointment, and can, as has already been noted, only vote in tie-breaks. This means that it is effectively one seat off your majority – fine in times when elections were won by big margins, but a problem in an age of coalitions and pacts.  whatsapp LONDON, ENGLAND – SEPTEMBER 24: House of Commons John Bercow speaks to the media following the Supreme Court ruling that the current suspension of parliament is unlawful one on September 24, 2019 in London, England. The court’s unanimous decision said that Prime Minister Boris Johnson acted unlawfully when he sought the current five-week prorogation, or suspension, of parliament. “The decision to advise Her Majesty to prorogue Parliament was unlawful because it had the effect of frustrating or preventing the ability of Parliament to carry out its constitutional functions without reasonable justification,” said Baroness Brenda Hale, the president of the court. (Photo by Hollie Adams/Getty Images) It is easy to overlook the role of the speaker, but his or her influence over the Commons is vast. The speaker controls who speaks in debates, what amendments can be tabled, and has the casting vote in ties. Each of these is a hugely influential power, and whoever inherits them now will be far less fettered than previous speakers, thanks in part to the behaviour of the outgoing office-holder.  The candidates know, no doubt, that whoever the Commons selects will have vital powers at a crucial point in our political history. It is perhaps the most significant speaker’s election in centuries.  John OxleyJohn Oxley is a Conservative commentator Yesterday, nine hopefuls vied with each other for the honour of replacing him, answering journalists’ questions on everything from the impartiality of the role, to Westminster’s alleged drug problem, to the rules on breast-feeding in the chamber. Even the merits of the speaker’s traditional dress (including a wig and knee breeches) were up for discussion. Opinion While Bercow has seen it differently, it is worth remembering that the speakership used to be a noble sacrifice, putting aside any ministerial ambitions for a role that was high on responsibility and low on glory.  On top of their formal role, the speaker sits as sole judge of parliamentary procedure.  Main image credit: Getty In following Bercow, the new speaker will also have some control over how the role itself is seen.  Though they reflect precedent, they are not bound by it and are free to create it. Many of the “rules” of parliament have been inventions of the speaker, from Denison’s rule that their crucial deciding vote should be used to maintain the status quo, to the prohibition on bringing the same vote multiple times. A radical speaker can rewrite the rule book as opportunity arises.   Should the next speaker recoil from this, it would mark Bercow as an aberration. Should they embrace it, the partisanship of the speaker would be hard to row back from.  Thursday 10 October 2019 4:34 amcenter_img Share As we move through and beyond Brexit, there are likely to be more closely-fought votes, battles over amendments, and difficult calls over parliamentary procedure.  There is little formal oversight of the speaker, but normally pressure from inside the Commons acts as a check. Indeed, Bercow’s own opportunity came when Michael Martin resigned in 2009 rather than face being the first speaker since 1695 to lose a vote of no confidence.  As for the election itself, the parties in the Commons will face a difficult choice in deciding if they want a friend or a foe in the chair.  The departure of John Bercow from the speakership of the House of Commons will create a vacancy of huge importance.  There is no denying that Bercow has been an activist speaker, arguably to the point of being partisan. Certainly, his rulings on Brexit results have shown a cavalier (or perhaps more strictly, Roundhead) approach to convention, repeatedly ruling in favour of Remainers when it came to procedural margin calls.  City A.M.’s opinion pages are a place for thought-provoking views and debate. These views are not necessarily shared by City A.M. The new speaker will have to decide on how to confront the ugliest parts of Bercow’s legacy: the failure to deal with bullying and sexual harassment within the parliamentary estate. This will appeal more to some of the candidates than making their name over contentious political issues.   There is evidently no shortage of volunteers this time around, so parliament must think carefully about who they choose, and what that choice will do to the role. As recently as 1971, a speaker could be nominated against their own wishes from the floor of the House.  It was once the case that speakers had to be dragged to the chair, so poisoned was the chalice of mediating between the Commons and the Crown. In 1449, an Agincourt veteran knighted on the field of battle refused to become speaker, not wanting to deal with the aftermath of England’s retreat from Normandy. by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeDaily FunnyFemale Athlete Fails You Can’t Look Away FromDaily FunnyNoteableyJulia Robert’s Daughter Turns 16 And Looks Just Like Her MomNoteableyFinanceChatterViewers Had To Look Away When This Happened On Live TVFinanceChatterPast Factory4 Sisters Take The Same Picture For 40 Years. Don’t Cry When You See The Last One!Past Factorybonvoyaged.comThese Celebs Are Complete Jerks In Real Life.bonvoyaged.comMisterStoryWoman files for divorce after seeing this photoMisterStoryYourDailyLamaHe Used To Be Handsome In 80s Now It’s Hard To Look At HimYourDailyLamazenherald.comDolly Finally Took Off Her Wig, Fans Gaspedzenherald.comJournalistateTeacher Wears Dress Everyday, Mom Sets Up CamJournalistate whatsapp Yet with no clear majority for anyone in the Commons, the chance of censuring the new speaker for anything short of flagrant transgressions will be slight. They will preside free of the usual pressures.  More From Our Partners Florida woman allegedly crashes children’s birthday party, rapes teennypost.comAstounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.orgA ProPublica investigation has caused outrage in the U.S. this weekvaluewalk.comPolice Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgKiller drone ‘hunted down a human target’ without being told tonypost.comNative American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.orgWhy people are finding dryer sheets in their mailboxesnypost.comlast_img read more

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