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Soviet collapse might explain mysterious trend in global methane emissions

first_imgFrom cow farts to factory emissions, there are a lot of ways to add methane to the atmosphere. Since the Industrial Revolution, the concentration of this potent greenhouse gas has risen rapidly and steadily, climbing from 700 parts per billion (ppb) in 1750 to more than 1800 ppb in 2015. But from 1999 to 2006, that increase temporarily leveled out, mystifying scientists. Now, a new study identifies the likeliest culprit behind the plateau—and singles out what may have kick-started the latest methane jump.Scientists had a lot of suspects to choose from. Natural sources of methane include wetlands and methane hydrates (methane trapped in ice and buried deep under ocean sediments), whereas human sources range from fossil fuel emissions to the burning of crops and trees to the cow and sheep “emissions” that are a byproduct of large-scale livestock farming. And then there are the sinks—the processes that remove methane. The largest methane sink is the atmosphere itself, where a series of chemical reactions converts the gas into carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and water.  But which of the processes was to blame for the plateau?“People were thinking in terms of a temporary suppression of sources,” says Heinrich Schaefer, an atmospheric scientist at New Zealand’s National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research in Wellington, and the lead author of the new study. “They could point to different things that may have contributed, but none was expected to be permanent.”Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)To find out what happened, Schaefer and his New Zealand-based team joined forces with researchers from the University of Colorado, Boulder, Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research and Heidelberg University in Germany. To get a global look at methane concentrations before, during, and after the plateau, the team amassed atmospheric methane concentration data from measuring stations from Canada to China to Australia, spanning a period from 1984 through 2015. They also examined previously published methane data from Antarctic ice cores extending back 2000 years to the near present.From there, they began to construct a model, using the yearly concentration changes to calculate changing emissions. The data also include carbon isotope values for the methane concentrations. Carbon isotopes, atoms of carbon that have different masses, are particularly helpful for identifying methane sources: Different sources have different relative amounts of carbon’s two nonradiogenic isotopes, carbon-13 and carbon-12. Processes like photosynthesis or microbial oxidation serve to “fractionate” the isotopes, increasing the proportion of carbon-12, which then gets translated to the emitted gas. As a result, methane emissions have distinct isotopic values: Methane emitted from any microbially driven source such as wetlands or agriculture have values of about -60‰ (signifying a relatively low ratio of carbon-13 to carbon-12); oil, gas, and coal emissions have an average carbon isotopic value of -37‰; and tree and crop burning averages about -22‰.Once they had their data, the scientists looked at what might have been behind the plateau. They found a sharp dip in methane concentrations after 1992; that dip corresponded with a decrease in a source with a carbon isotopic value of about -40‰. “That squarely fits the fossil fuel signature,” Schaefer says. The data don’t themselves prove what led to such a dramatic decrease in emissions, but Schaefer’s team had a guess: the collapse of fossil fuel production in the Soviet Union following its 1991 breakup.So why did methane emissions start to climb again around 2006? Once again, the team ran models to test various inputs and see how they matched global station measurements. This time, the dominant carbon isotopic values in the new inputs were about -60‰, pointing to a microbially driven source rather than fossil fuel inputs. Given the size of the source, the likely culprit was either an increase in wetland emissions or in agricultural production. To figure out which one was ultimately responsible, Schaefer and his team turned to satellite data, which revealed that the largest post-2006 increases in atmospheric methane were occurring in China, India, and Southeast Asia.That helped narrow down the sources, Schaefer says, because different types of wetlands have different isotopic signatures. While permafrost thawing or boreal wetlands in high latitudes have values of about -60‰, tropical wetlands—such as would be found in those regions—have slightly less negative values, about -52‰. But most tropical wetlands are in the southern hemisphere—not the region identified by the satellite images. That strongly implicated agriculture as the driver for the latest methane increases, the team reports online today in Science. Schaefer says that both rice farming and livestock have likely contributed—although ruminants like cows and sheep overall contribute three times the amount of methane to the atmosphere.That agriculture, rather than fossil fuels, is driving methane poses a new set of problems for governments trying to fight climate change, Schaefer says. “They have to weigh mitigation of climate change against food security,” he says, which means exploring technical solutions that can optimize food production and minimize greenhouse gas emissions. One example: Recent research has shown that changing the flooding practices in rice terraces can reduce emissions while keeping harvests steady.This paper “is timely and an important step forward in understanding changes in the global methane budget,” says Isobel Simpson, an atmospheric chemist at the University of California, Irvine, who was not involved in the study. She notes, however, that other recent work on ethane emissions—which can co-occur with methane—suggests a considerable contribution from fossil fuel sources to the recent methane increase. That research suggests fossil fuels are behind at least 28% of that increase—so, she adds, more work is needed to reduce uncertainties and reconcile the ethane-based and isotope-based conclusions.Schaefer agrees that this is an open question, noting that in the United States there has been an increase in methane leakage from gas facilities, which also leak ethane, he says. The magnitude of those emissions is among “the next questions we’ll have to look at.”last_img read more

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Dark matter search comes up empty

first_imgThe latest, most sensitive search for particles of dark matter—the bizarre invisible stuff in which our galaxy appears to be embedded—has come up empty. Since 2012, physicists working with the Large Underground Xenon (LUX) detector, pictured above, had been searching for evidence of so-called weakly interacting massive particles, or WIMPs, bumping into the atomic nuclei in 370 kilograms of frigid liquid xenon. But the experiment, which is housed 1480 meters deep in the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, South Dakota, ended its final 20-month run in May, and researchers see no evidence for such particles, as they reported today at a conference in Sheffield, U.K. Physicists will continue to search for WIMPs—their candidate for the dark matter whose gravity appears to bind the galaxies. Experimenters working in Italy’s subterranean Gran Sasso National Laboratory in L’Aquila are firing up XENON1T, a detector that contains 3.5 metric tons of liquid xenon, which should be 100 times more sensitive than LUX. And LUX researchers are working on an upgraded detector called LZ, which would contain 10 metric tons and come on in 2020. Meanwhile, physicists’ enthusiasm for WIMPs may be cooling—not just because they haven’t found them yet, but also because experimenters working with the world’s biggest atom smasher, Europe’s Large Hadron Collider, have yet to blast such particles into existence, as theory suggests it should.last_img read more

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Fighting poverty might make it harder to fight climate change

first_img Fighting poverty might make it harder to fight climate change Lifting people out of poverty is a noble goal, but it could make it harder to fight climate change. That’s the conclusion of a new study, which finds that elevating the world’s poorest individuals into the middle class would significantly increase carbon emissions, requiring greater efforts to combat global warming.One in five people in developing nations lives on less than $1.90 a day, where they lack basic needs such as food and water and have limited access to education. Most are found in southern Asia and sub-Saharan Africa. In 2014, the United Nations agreed on a list of sustainable development goals, the first of which is to “end poverty in all forms everywhere.” The agenda set targets to eradicate extreme poverty by 2030. A year later, the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change set a goal to keep global warming below 2°C above preindustrial levels.Klaus Hubacek, an ecological economist at the University of Maryland in College Park, and his colleagues wondered whether these two initiatives might be in conflict. As people earn more money, they spend it on things like travel that increase the amount of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gasses pumped into the atmosphere. Climate change and poverty—“these are really the two most important questions humanity faces,” he says.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)To see whether the United Nations’s goal to eliminate poverty and stay within 2°C of warming could both be achieved, the researchers modeled two scenarios: one that just brought the world’s poorest out of extreme poverty, and the other raised them to a modest level of income. Then they calculated the carbon footprints for each income group before and after, based on the World Bank’s Global Consumption Database.Fighting poverty might make fighting climate change harder, the team found. Eradicating extreme poverty, defined as living on less than $1.90 per day, doesn’t jeopardize the 2°C climate target, the team reports today in Nature Communications. Doing so is projected to contribute just 0.05°C in additional warming by the end of the century. However, bringing the world’s poorest to the next income level—the global middle class average income of $2.97 per day—would add another 0.6°C to the already projected 2°C of warming by 2100.The study implies that climate and human development goals are not necessarily inconsistent, but “It really kind of depends on what level of poverty we’re OK with,” says Steve Davis, an earth systems scientist at the University of California, Irvine, who was not involved with the work. The bottom line, he adds: “If we’re really trying to consider getting people not just out of extreme poverty, but into the middle class, then maybe we do have more of a challenge.”Lifting everyone to the global middle class would require a 27% increase in efforts to reduce carbon emissions, compared with the 4% per year required without poverty reduction goals. But even the most ambitious countries, such as Sweden, have achieved little more than a 4% reduction per year, doing so by replacing fossil fuels with nuclear energy and hydropower.However, the technologies that exist have been unable to keep up with additional emissions so far, the authors say. Davis says the pace will pick up if and when clean energy becomes cheaper than fossil fuels. In the meantime, Hubacek and his colleagues call for lifestyle changes, such as switching to a vegetarian diet, using public transportation, traveling less or shorter distances, and living in smaller houses. Although individuals, cities, and states can take action to reduce carbon emissions, Hubacek says massive involvement is needed by the state as well, like implementing a carbon tax. “Time is really running out.” Bringing half the world’s population out of poverty will also lead to an increase in carbon emissions. By Allie WilkinsonOct. 24, 2017 , 5:30 PM Hakbong Kwon/Alamy Stock Photo last_img read more

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Human activity slashes mammal stomping grounds by up to two-thirds

first_img Human activity slashes mammal stomping grounds by up to two-thirds The modern world would barely be recognizable to the mammoth and bison herds of ages past. Roads subdivide large stretches of land, and clusters of buildings and people have sprung up nearly everywhere. Indeed, humans have modified the environment so much, they may have cut the distance by which mammals—large and small—roam by some two-thirds, according to a novel analysis published today. That lack of movement could upend ecosystems and increase the number of human-animal conflicts, researchers say.“We’re moving into an era where humans have changed natural environments extensively,” says Oscar Venter, an ecologist at the University of Northern British Columbia in Prince George, Canada, who calls the new paper “very important” with significant implications. “What’s not exactly clear is what this is going to mean.”Scientists have tried to figure out how human activity affects animals for decades. For nearly 20 years, for example, they have used GPS collars to track threatened species living in national parks, in farmlands, and near suburbs and cities. But such studies typically follow a single species or population over time, limiting how the results can be applied.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)A few years ago, Marlee Tucker, a biologist at the Senckenberg Biodiversity and Climate Research Centre at Goethe University in Frankfurt, Germany, and other researchers decided to launch a much wider scale study. They wanted to compare the movements of as many mammal species as possible—from pocket mice to grizzly bears—and find out how much human actions affect those activities.So Tucker started collecting data on the whereabouts of animals equipped with GPS collars from previous studies. She and her team assembled one of the largest data sets—more than 800 animals from 57 species—to date. They then compared the movements of those creatures with a previously published index of human activity, which included everything from the presence of roads, buildings, and nighttime lights to population density and land devoted to farming in different areas.The team found that mammals in areas with a large human “footprint” moved half to a third as far as those in areas with a low human footprint. In areas most heavily influenced by people, the animals’ maximum roaming range averaged about 7 kilometers; for low-footprint areas, the average roaming range was 22 kilometers, Tucker and colleagues report in Science. “Such dramatic reductions in the movement of species are surprising and very important for what’s going to happen in the future,” Venter says.That’s because movements of mammals are critical not only for the animals themselves, but for the ecosystems they inhabit. “Animals act as mobile links, linking different areas of a landscape together,” Tucker says. One of the best examples of potential ecosystem collapse is near the border of Kenya and Tanzania, in the Serengeti–Masai Mara ecosystem, says Jared Stabach, an ecologist at the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute in Washington, D.C. Wildebeests there carry seeds and nutrients as they traverse the landscape during their annual migration. But now that roads, agriculture, and poaching threaten their migration, that could mean those resources don’t get distributed throughout the ecosystem. The loss could trickle down to local economies that depend on tourism, Stabach says.Humans are changing the landscape in other ways. Farmed crops provide ample food sources that encourage small and large mammals alike to take up a sedentary lifestyle. Those clusters of nonmigrating creatures in turn provide a rich breeding ground for diseases like avian flu. And the closer wildlife strays to human habitation, the greater the opportunity for human-animal conflict. “Every animal is balancing on a knife’s edge to get resources while minimizing risk,” says Grant Hopcraft, an ecologist at the University of Glasgow in the United Kingdom who was not involved in the work.Venter would like to see a longer-term version of the study, because Tucker’s analysis examines movement over just 10 days. “That’ll tell us something about the trajectory of change as we go forward,” he says. That’s if there’s a future to go toward. Hopecraft says that built environments are increasingly widespread, and as for once-dynamic ecosystems, “We’re essentially wrapping them in plastic shrink wrap and hoping they’re going to survive.” Sam Hobson/Minden Pictures Foxes tend to roam in areas near human habitation with easy access to food.  By Roni DenglerJan. 25, 2018 , 3:40 PMlast_img read more

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The key to stopping mass shootings? Treat them like a public health disaster, this scientist says

first_img UC Davis Health Illustration Services Background checks for all firearm transactions could reduce the risk of violence. The key to stopping mass shootings? Treat them like a public health disaster, this scientist says AP Photo/Philip Kamrass By Frankie SchembriSep. 27, 2018 , 11:30 AMcenter_img Garen Wintemute  Some of the deadliest mass shootings in U.S. history, including lone gunmen killing 26 people at the First Baptist Church in Sutherland Springs, Texas, and 17 students and staff at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, have occurred in the past 2 years.These tragedies were preventable, says Garen Wintemute, an emergency medicine physician at the University of California (UC), Davis, Medical Center, and the director of UC Davis’s Violence Prevention Research Program. Wintemute has studied gun violence for more than 30 years and is one of the few researchers to approach the matter as an issue of public health. He has gone undercover at gun shows to document illegal activity and worked with California lawmakers to establish gun policies.Wintemute writes about his solutions to gun violence in an opinion piece published this week in The New England Journal of Medicine. Science chatted with him about the unique factors behind mass shootings and which policy interventions are most effective. This interview has been edited for clarity and length.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Q: What does it mean to approach gun violence from a public health perspective?A: Firearm violence has been seen traditionally as a crime problem. But gun violence is one of our leading causes of death and injury, and the implications of this violence are huge in terms of the safety and health of our overall population. So, we treat it as we would any other major health problem. We ask: Where does it come from? How does it get amplified? Who is at risk for developing this problem? Can we learn enough to create a treatment or prevention strategy?Q: How are mass shootings different from other acts of gun violence? A: They are rare, accounting for maybe 1% of deaths from firearm violence. But they are also unique. They are the one form of violence about which no one can tell a story that leaves themselves out. It could happen to me. It could happen to my children. It could happen to my grandchildren. What public mass shootings have sadly done is, for the first time in history, made this everyone’s problem. The specific role of my article is to point out that there are some very specific things that we can do to help make these events a lot less likely to happen. Q: The first way you say we can stop mass shootings is through better background checks. How do we improve them?A: Twenty-two percent of all firearm transfers in the country do not involve a background check. These take place over the internet, at gun shows, or a brokered through “friend of a friend” exchanges. Some states require a background check for all transfers of firearms, but most states do not, and the federal government does not. Comprehensive, well-designed background checks, as well as regular reporting by agencies of incidents that would prohibit someone from purchasing a gun would let us see the full effectiveness of this policy.Q: Your second recommendation is for gun violence restraining orders. What do these involve?A: If a person is credibly believed to be at high and imminent risk of doing harm and has access to firearms, these laws allow law enforcement or family members to go to a judge and present the evidence just as they would in any other court proceeding. The judge can then issue an order that authorizes law enforcement to recover firearms from this individual for a defined period of time, typically just 2 or 3 weeks.These orders, if properly used, would not just prevent individual tragedies but could probably drop rates of violence altogether because it’s so common that a future shooter puts out unmistakable signals of intent to do harm. This can mean telling hospital staff, friends, or family that they’re planning on hurting themselves or others. It can mean unusual patterns of purchasing weapons, like purchasing several firearms in a short time span. Here in California, I am aware of two mass shootings that did not occur because the intended shooters said things like, “I’m going to shoot up a school,” which came to the attention of law enforcement.Q: Do you ever encounter resistance to your work because of the political debate around gun control?A: There’s always controversy with this sort of work, but to me the common ground far outweighs it. One of the policy proposals that is widely seen as highly controversial is to require a background check for all purchases of firearms. More than 90% of the population supports that measure, but so do more than 80% of gun owners and more than 70% of self-identified members of the National Rifle Association.A mistake that is often made—it’s made by the public, it’s made by the media—is to pay attention to the extremes and ignore the fact that the country has basically made up its mind on this one. We just need our leadership to represent the opinions of the people and not the opinions of the extremes.Q: What are you going to study next?A: We’re conducting a true randomized trial of an intervention here in California that identifies people who legally purchased firearms in the past but have just become prohibited from owning firearms. They’ve just been convicted of a violent crime, or they’ve just been served with a domestic violence restraining order, or they’ve just been hospitalized for a psychiatric emergency related to dangerousness to self or others. The intervention in California identifies those people, then puts law enforcement officers at the front door to recover the firearms. Intuitively, it sounds like a good idea, but no one knows whether that process is effective in reducing rates in violence. We are collaborating with enforcement agencies on a randomized trial that involves almost the entire state. This is the same process used throughout medical research to test how effective a given treatment is—only this time the treatment is a firearm policy.last_img read more

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De Ligt makes history

first_img Watch Serie A live in the UK on Premier Sports for just £11.99 per month including live LaLiga, Eredivisie, Scottish Cup Football and more. Visit: https://subscribe.premiersports.tv/ Matthijs de Ligt made history, becoming the first foreign player to score his debut Juventus goal in the Derby della Mole. The Dutchman became the first foriegn player in Juve’s 122-year history to score their first goal for the club against city rivals Torino. De Ligt, signed for €75m in the summer from Ajax, volleyed home in the 70th minute following a Gonzalo Higuain cut back from a corner. The goal will take a weight off the young player’s shoulders, as he’s struggled in his opening months in Bianconeri colours.last_img read more

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No DRS system for India-Australia series

first_imgThe much debated Decision Review System will not be used in the forthcoming Test and ODI series between hosts India and Australia.”There won’t be any DRS in the series. We have already written to the International Cricket Council,” said Cricket Board’s CAO, Prof Ratnakar Shetty here today.Australia, who are set to arrive on September 21, are to play two Tests (at Mohali and Bangalore) and three ODIs (at Kochi, Vishakapatnam and Goa).Asked if the DRS could be used in next year’s Cricket World Cup to be held in the sub-continent, Shetty, who is also the Tournament Director, said it was an ICC event and the world body called the shots over the issue.On July 1, the ICC Executive Board met in Singapore and approved 13 recommendations relating to the use of DRS in Test matches and the 2011 World Cup following recommendations from its Cricket Committee and minor amendments from the Chief Executives’ Committee (CEC).One of the decisions was that the host member board would determine whether to use DRS in home Test series (following consultation with the visiting country).It was also agreed that DRS would be used in 2011 World Cup if agreement can be reached with the ICC’s broadcast partner ESPN STAR Sports, the host countries (Bangladesh, India and Sri Lanka) and if there is sufficient technology available to operate DRS in a global event.ICC Chief Executive Haroon Lorgat said after the meeting that the world governing body for the game was eager to use DRS in cricket’s mega event.advertisement”We have all seen the benefits of using DRS to assist umpires in Test cricket and we are now keen to use DRS in the ICC Cricket World Cup,” he had said.last_img read more

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Ban ‘fixers’ for life: Warne, Fletcher

first_imgAustralian spin legend Shane Warne and former England coach Duncan Fletcher on Thursday joined the growing clamour for life bans on Pakistani cricketers Salman Butt, Mohammad Asif and Mohammad Aamir if they are found guilty of ‘spot-fxing’.Pakistan’s Test skipper Butt and pacers Mohammad Asif and Mohammad are facing a Scotland Yard investigation over their alleged involvement in a betting scam “exposed” by a British tabloid’s sting operation.Warne, who was himself fined for sharing information with a bookie in 1994, said if found guilty, the Pakistani players deserve nothing less then a life ban.”If it is true and they have been found (guilty of) match-fixing and throwing games and spot betting with the no-balls and stuff, if that’s the case they should be thrown out,” Warne was quoted as saying in media reports here.”It’s as simple as that. I don’t think there should be any other way to do it. If it’s fixed by players, they should be banned for life. Anyone who’s involved should be thrown out,” he said.The former leg-spinner was a commentator during this January’s Australia-Pakistan Sydney Test which is suspected to have been fixed. Warne said he would not be surprised if it turns out that the match, in which Australia pulled off an unlikely 36-run win, was indeed rigged.”They are only allegations at the moment so I suppose you have to say innocent until proven guilty,” Warne said.”But looking back at the (Sydney) Test match, if it was fixed, you could understand how it was fixed by the way they were captaining the side and their tactics. It would make sense — if it was true,” he added.advertisementFormer England coach Fletcher said if the Pakistani cricketers are found guilty, it would do irreparable damage to the game and the cricketing ties between England and Pakistan.”We must remember that allegations of malpractice made against some of Pakistan’s players remain unproven. But if the allegations are true then Pakistan are guilty of a terrible lack of respect to the game and to English cricket,” Fletcher wrote in his column for ‘The Guardian’.”England have gone out of their way to help Pakistan cricket at a difficult time in their history. They have recognised the huge problems Pakistan cricket faces while they cannot stage matches in their own country because of the threat of terrorism. You would not think it was possible to squeeze any more cricket into an English summer, but somehow they did it. To read the allegations that are now being made is pretty hurtful,” he added.Fletcher said the scandal should not be taken lightly and the game’s administrators should be ruthless in dealing with the guilty.”Treating cricket with disrespect is not a frivolous matter. There must be no distinction between a player found guilty of rigging an entire match and a player found guilty of deliberately bowling a no ball. We must be ruthless and put the fear of God into people. Even the smallest transgression must mean that a career is over,” he said.last_img read more

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Tri-series: Gambhir may sit out in next ODI

first_imgOpener Gautam Gambhir’s back-to-back 90s against Australia and Sri Lanka have not only helped India’s cause, but have given steel to an otherwise wobbly line-up. However, in the next ODI against Australia on Sunday he could be seen warming the benches as per Team India’s rotation policy.After his disastrous Test tour Down Under, Gambhir came back into his own in the ongoing tri-nation CB Series.Overcoming his shortcomings against extreme swing and pace, which were exposed time and again as India were whitewashed by the hosts in recently concluded Test series, the Delhi Dasher back to form guiding his side to a credible victory over the number one team with his 92 runs on last Sunday.Gambhir stamped his authority against Sri Lanka with a critical 91 in Tuesday’s tie to turn his fortunes as only he can. With 188 runs at a healthy average of over 60 in three innings so far, the opener has risen to the Aussie test emerging as India’s premier in-form batsman.However, with the men in blue determined on their rotation policy with the openers, Gambhir might well be forced to warm the benches in the upcoming Brisbane ODI.Skipper M.S. Dhoni recently said, “The interest of the team comes first. This is the time when we can do that. Gauti has scored runs. We also want Viru and Sachin to score runs so that the best XI can play the finals.”No doubt, Virender Sehwag and Sachin Tendulkar’s return to top form would strengthen India’s chances of sealing a final spot. But the repeated failures of the big guns combined with the flop show from young Suresh Raina and Rohit Sharma have only highlighted Gambhir’s value to reigning world champions.advertisementThe team management, however, seems willing to compromise on their best XI considering the long term goals.”These youngsters will be there for 2015 World Cup. We may not be there. It is important for them to experience conditions,” Dhoni insisted.It is indeed a catch 22 situation for Team India down under. While it is critical that one keeps an eye on the bigger picture, the team would have to guard against hampering the in-form Gambhir’s rhythm by reducing to the sidelines. After all, he has given ample evidence of why he would be key to India’s hopes of a second CB Series triumph.last_img read more

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Jayanta Talukdar world No. 1 in recurve bow after win at World Cup in Croatia

first_imgJayanta TalukdarHe loves the Max Payne video game and action movies like Mr & Mrs Smith, but Messrs Payne and Pitt have nothing on 20-year-old archer Jayanta Talukdar.The Guwahati native, now a rising star in his sport, is ranked world No. 1 in the recurve bow after a gold medal,Jayanta TalukdarHe loves the Max Payne video game and action movies like Mr & Mrs Smith, but Messrs Payne and Pitt have nothing on 20-year-old archer Jayanta Talukdar.The Guwahati native, now a rising star in his sport, is ranked world No. 1 in the recurve bow after a gold medal win at the World Cup in Croatia.Only a perfect ten off his final arrow would secure gold. “All I had to do was shoot perfectly”, he says of the time he nailed the bull’s-eye.The Asian Games this year are next and then, of course, the Olympics.last_img read more

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Brazilian swimmer banned for two years

first_imgBrazilian swimmer Glauber Silva has been banned for two years and stripped of his place at the London Olympics for doping.Silva, who last month qualified for the 100m butterfly event in London, tested positive to excess levels of testosterone during Brazil’s Olympic swimming trials in April, Xinhua reports.He was handed the sentence by Brazil’s swimming confederation (CBDA) Wednesday after being found guilty by a doping panel.The CBDA also announced suspensions to swimmers Flavia Delaroli and Pamela Alencar.Delaroli was handed a three-month ban for using tuaminoheptane while Alencar was suspended for six months for testing positive for the diuretic furosemide.Silva’s claim that increased levels of testosterone were caused by a hormonal imbalance were refuted by the panel, which said the results were consistent with steroid use.The suspensions are the latest in a string of doping scandals to hit Brazilian swimming.Last month, Barbara Benke was banned for four months after testing positive to isometheptene.In 2011, four swimmers tested positive to furosemide, including defending Olympic 50m freestyle champion Cesar Cielo, who was later cleared.last_img read more

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Good old-fashioned hitting is the shortest ride to cricketing fame

first_imgWhy do you think more of Sir Viv Richards than Michael Bevan? Is it because the sight of the ball disappearing into and over billboards satisfies some primal instinct? Or is it that the swaggering charm of the West Indian reminds you of what you could have been – the,Why do you think more of Sir Viv Richards than Michael Bevan? Is it because the sight of the ball disappearing into and over billboards satisfies some primal instinct? Or is it that the swaggering charm of the West Indian reminds you of what you could have been – the clockwork efficiency of the Aussie one-day specialist bringing to mind the classmate who was the perennial star of the prize-distribution day and the villain of your nightmares? You are not alone. Outside the sight of a lucky captain holding aloft the World Cup before millions of viewers, good old-fashioned hitting is the shortest ride to cricketing fame. Only bowlers want to forget hitters like Richards and Sanath Jayasuriya. Lance Klusener’s Cup performances in 1999 alone mean that no matter what his form, he will be held in dread till the day he retires. Hitting is one tradition that is in no danger of going out of fashion. In South Africa, keep your eyes peeled for Virender Sehwag and Adam Gilchrist. Vivian Richards Master blasterThe World Cup is the stage for the kings of cricket. No one combined the regal arrogance and brute power of a monarch better than the son of an Antiguan jail superintendent. There were big hitters in cricket before him and there will be many more after him, but Isaac Vivian Alexander Richards was an original. Richards stood alone in a great team for the clean authority of his batting. A 23-year-old Richards came upon his – and cricket’s – first Cup in 1975 quietly, a debutant who scored 38 runs in all; but he impacted the final against Australia, running out Alan Turner and the Chappell brothers, Greg and Ian, to break partnerships that were threatening the West Indian total of 291. The West Indians ended up winning by 17 runs and were crowned cricket’s first world champions at Lord’s. Four years later when he returned to the World Cup, Richards was regarded as the game’s most fearsome and fearless hitter who swatted bouncers off his face and took on the fastest bowlers with gum-chewing insouciance. In the 1979 final, West Indies were 4-99 but England couldn’t stop Richards. He tore into the bowling, and when the dust settled was 138 not out, off 157 balls (11 fours, three sixes). A 137-run partnership between Richards and Collis King helped West Indies reach a total of 286. It was a bridge too far for England. The most destructive batsman in modern cricket had destroyed them long before they began to bat; England lost by 92 runs. For Richards the second consecutive World Cup win was, he says, “A turning point in the West Indian cricket history. We knew we could beat anybody and had no reason to feel inferior.”advertisementMark Greatbatch Pinch Perfect Mark Greatbatch was unstoppable in 1992. Part of Martin Crowe’s strategy to take opponents by surprise in the World Cup, the hefty lefthander was one Kiwi who took wing and flew far that year. Sent as a pinchhitter – with the brief to lead a kamikaze’s life at the crease – Greatbatch, a middle-order batsman by choice, revelled in rubbing opening bowlers the wrong way. Crowe’s novel strategy of having him hit quick bowlers over the top in the first 15 overs worked well for New Zealand. Opposition quickies didn’t have the time to adapt their bowling against the assault. The prematch meetings of rivals started centring on thinking of ways to contain Greatbatch with only two fielders at the fence in the initial overs. It was during New Zealand’s third league match against South Africa that Greatbatch’s intentions became clear. His 68 took only 60 balls. His 63 against the Windies and 73 in the match with India came in bursts of boundaries and sixes. Other teams were quick to learn the Greatbatch Way. Today, all sides grant one-day openers the licence to go after the bowling in the first 15. Greatbatch couldn’t keep up with the pace he had set and is forgotten today. But every time an opening batsmen gets ready to go for broke, the Greatbatch spirit lives on.Sanath Jayasuriya  Matara Mauler Nobody was afraid of Sanath Jayasuriya when World Cup 1996 began. That was because no one had heard of him. But Jayasuriya took only one month to gain fame to last a lifetime. In partnership with Romesh Kaluwitharana, he took Manoj Prabhakar’s first two overs in the World Cup group match in Delhi for 33 runs. It was enough to shatter the bowler’s confidence forever. The short boundaries at the Ferozeshah Kotla had never looked nearer the batting crease. In the game against Kenya at Kandy, the Lankan was at it again, the team putting up 50 on the board in 20 balls. In the quarterfinal against England, Jayasuriya took four consecutive fours off Richard Illingworth. A six off Phillip DeFreitas landed on the pavilion roof.advertisementThe batsman’s 82 took just 44 balls. In the 1996 Cup, giving even the first ball of the innings the treatment wasn’t beyond Jayasuriya. He still treats bowlers in much the same way.Sourav Ganguly Bengal Tiger The India captain is going through batting horrors at the moment, but there are bowlers from Shaun Pollock to Chaminda Vaas who know what the left-handed opening bat is capable of on the big day. Ever since he took on the job of opening the Indian innings, first with Sachin Tendulkar and now with Virender Sehwag, Ganguly has brought his gift of clean timing, sparkling off-side play and an unabashed braggadocio into play in the one-day game. Ganguly stamped his presence on the World Cup with a mammoth innings versus Sri Lanka in Taunton in 1999. His 183 is the highest score by an Indian in a World Cup innings. Ganguly’s blitz of 183, with 17 fours and seven sixes, also equalled a record for the maximum number of sixes in a World Cup innings. In 2003, he will relish fighting his way out of the corner he is in.last_img read more

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Familiarity helps Dennison stop Desiderio in FEU win over UP

first_imgPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netGuarding Paul Desiderio was never strange for Ron Dennison.The two were teammates in high school at University of Visayas and both entered the UAAP at the same time in Season 76 and this familiarity helped Dennison put a stranglehold on Desiderio.ADVERTISEMENT ‘A complete lie:’ Drilon refutes ‘blabbermouth’ Salo’s claims Desiderio, the University of the Philippines’ stalwart headed into the Sunday matchup against Far Eastern University averaging 21 points a game, and Dennison made sure Desiderio would not reach that mark.“We were teammates in high school, so I knew how he moved,” said Dennison in Filipino after FEU trumped UP, 78-59, at Smart Araneta Coliseum. “I just played straight-up clean defense.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSBoxers Pacquiao, Petecio torchbearers for SEA Games openingREAD: FEU rolls to 3rd straight win, routs UPWith Dennison hounding him, Desiderio struggled from the floor, scoring ust nine points on 4-of-12 shooting, and converted only one of his five attempts from long range. Hotel says PH coach apologized for ‘kikiam for breakfast’ claim Winter storm threatens to scramble Thanksgiving travel plans And, just for the record, Desiderio is 0-7 against Dennison. 29 football fans hurt as French stadium barrier collapses Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Argentine bishop appears at court hearing on abuse charges For the complete collegiate sports coverage including scores, schedules and stories, visit Inquirer Varsity. Trump to designate Mexican drug cartels as terrorist groupscenter_img Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next MOST READ Desiderio also came off a career performance in a stunning win over defending champion La Salle with 30 points.READ: Desiderio struggles, praises ‘great defender’ DennisonDennison also made his presence felt on the offensive end with 16 points and three assists while also grabbing seven rebounds.The two also had an interesting duel last season in the first round when Dennison got ejected.“Last year, he one-upped me with that flop so during the game he started acting again but I didn’t let him do the same thing again,” said Dennison.ADVERTISEMENT LATEST STORIES Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’ No more menthol cigarettes: New ban on tobacco, vape flavors Jordan delivers on promise: 2 Cobra choppers now in PH Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games View commentslast_img read more

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UAAP Starting Five: Week 9

first_imgPalace: Robredo back to ‘groping with a blind vision’ Hotel says PH coach apologized for ‘kikiam for breakfast’ claim Only eight games were played this week as the UAAP Season 80 men’s basketball tournament resumed after the Halloween break.ADVERTISEMENT Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’ Malditas save PH from shutout Papi Sarr. Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPapi Sarr just showed University of the Philippines who’s the boss.The 6-foot-8 Soaring Falcon towed Adamson University in an all-important 86-70 win over the Fighting Maroons on Sunday putting up a gaudy 25-point, 17-rebound line.Sarr’s dominance over UP helped the 9-4 Soaring Falcons seal the third spot with a game to spare in their schedule.Forward: Arvin Tolentino (Far Eastern University Tamaraws)Arvin Tolentino. Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netThe birthday boy delivered the goods for Far Eastern University when the Tamaraws needed it the most.ADVERTISEMENT Matt Nieto (Ateneo Blue Eagles)Matt Nieto. Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netAs Ravena filled up the box scores against UST, Matt Nieto lit up from deep.Nieto had 19 points in the Blue Eagles’ 102-83 win over UST and all five of his field goals came from beyond-the-arc.Not too shabby for Nieto, who exploited the Growling Tigers’ lackadaisical perimeter defense. Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next All but one of the Final Four spots are now filled as Adamson University secured the third seed with Far Eastern University currently in fourth.University of the Philippines is a full game behind FEU while National University will now need to have its prayers answered if it wants to get to the semifinals.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSBoxers Pacquiao, Petecio torchbearers for SEA Games openingNow that the Final Four scenarios have been settled, here are the best players by position this week.Center: Papi Sarr (Adamson University Soaring Falcons) The Fatted Calf and Ayutthaya: New restos worth the drive to Tagaytay After 30 years, Johnlu Koa still doing ‘hard-to-make’ quality breads And the game’s magnitude wasn’t much of a factor for Pingoy as he put up 15 points, eight assists, six steals, and zero turnovers against the Fighting Maroons.Pingoy’s savvy play helped Adamson take an 86-70 win over UP as the Soaring Falcons calmly perched at the third seed and the 5-7 Fighting Maroons dropping to fifth.Guard: Jasper Parker (Far Eastern University Tamaraws)Jasper Parker. Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netWith his family cheering him on, and the Tamaraws eager to take sole possession of fourth place, Jasper Parker put on a show.Parker led the Tamaraw charge against UE on Sunday with a season-high18 points and eight assists as his family saw him play at the historic Smart Araneta Coliseum for the first time.Honorable mentionsBen Mbala (De La Salle Green Archers)Ben Mbala. Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netIt’s kind of awkward to see reigning MVP Ben Mbala get relegated to the honorable mention spot.Well the reason for that is Sarr’s game with Adamson had a bigger implication as the win led to the Soaring Falcons securing the third spot while Mbala’s Green Archers already had their twice-to-beat advantage in their possession even before the Halloween break.Still, Mbala produced this week’s highest-scoring output with 30 points that went along eight boards.center_img MRT 7 on track for partial opening in 2021 For the complete collegiate sports coverage including scores, schedules and stories, visit Inquirer Varsity. Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. MOST READ FEU needed to win its Sunday’s game against University of the East and the 22-year-old Tolentino heeded the call when the Tamaraws needed a closer.With a 49-49 score board at the end of the third quarter, Tolentino completed a four-point play that completed the Tamaraws’ 21-8 run in the fourth that gave FEU a comfortable 70-57 lead with 3:27 left in the game.FEU held on to win 79-63 to get to 6-6, and the fourth spot, with Tolentino finishing with 10 points, seven in the fourth, and seven boards.Forward: Thirdy Ravena (Ateneo Blue Eagles)Thirdy Ravena. Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netAteneo already secured the top seed in the league even before it faced University of Santo Tomas on Saturday.That precedent, however, didn’t prevent Thirdy Ravena from putting on a show in front of the hapless Growling Tigers.Ravena finished with 20 points, eight rebounds, and seven assists in the Blue Eagles’ 102-83 victory over UST and produced one of the best highlights of the season when he jammed home a tomahawk with 2:22 left in the game.Guard: Jerie Pingoy (Adamson University Soaring Falcons)Jerie Pingoy. Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netWhat a surprise, another Soaring Falcon.When Sarr bullied his way through the UP interior, Jerie Pingoy orchestrated in and out of it. View comments It’s final: Bundit still Ateneo Lady Eagles coach ‘A complete lie:’ Drilon refutes ‘blabbermouth’ Salo’s claims Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games LATEST STORIESlast_img read more

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Jordan Spieth finishes with an eagle at the Australian Open

first_imgJordan Spieth of the U.S. hits his second shot on the 10th hole during the fourth round of the Australian Open Golf tournament in Sydney, Sunday, Nov. 26, 2017. (AP Photo/Rick Rycroft)SYDNEY — Defending champion Jordan Spieth’s difficult week in Sydney ended on a positive note Sunday — the American eagled the 18th hole for a 4-under 67.Spieth never seemed comfortable at The Australian Golf Club earlier in the tournament and couldn’t break 70 over the first three rounds, posting earlier scores of 70-71-70 for a tournament total of 6-under 278.ADVERTISEMENT “It was a great finish,” Spieth said. “I felt like I hit a lot of really beautiful shots that weren’t necessarily rewarded today based on just trying to judge the crosswinds.“That’s all it was today. I really felt like I shot 62 today and it was 67, I had so many looks.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSBoxers Pacquiao, Petecio torchbearers for SEA Games openingSpieth was coming off his longest layoff since his college days, nearly seven weeks since last playing in the Presidents Cup.Spieth was also playing without his regular caddie, Michael Greller, who stayed in the U.S. after the recent birth of his son. Spieth’s longtime coach, Australian Cameron McCormick, was on his bag the week Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games ‘A complete lie:’ Drilon refutes ‘blabbermouth’ Salo’s claims Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Jordan delivers on promise: 2 Cobra choppers now in PH Malditas save PH from shutout Hotel says PH coach apologized for ‘kikiam for breakfast’ claim Spieth was trying to win the Australian Open for the third time in four years.He won the Australian Open in 2014 in his first appearance in the tournament when it was played at The Australian. He won again last year in a playoff at Royal Sydney. In 2015, he finished in a tie for second with Adam Scott and a shot behind winner Matt Jones at The Australian.He said having his coach as caddie was beneficial.“I was just kind of voicing a lot more than I would have ever voiced to Michael,” Spieth said. “I thought it was important for Cam to kind of hear how I’m feeling hole after hole, day after day and about different situations. I think we actually made a lot of progress in that sense, or at least have a good starting point to make some progress this off-season.”Spieth was non-committal about making another trip Down Under for next year’s Australian Open.ADVERTISEMENT Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’center_img The Fatted Calf and Ayutthaya: New restos worth the drive to Tagaytay Wolves beat Booker-less Suns MRT 7 on track for partial opening in 2021 “I’d love to explore it,” Spieth said. “It’s just a matter of, like I’ve said every year, I try and figure out what’s going on the next week, let alone a year from now.”Spieth will play next week at the Hero World Challenge in the Bahamas where tournament host Tiger Woods will make his return to competitive golf.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next MOST READ After 30 years, Johnlu Koa still doing ‘hard-to-make’ quality breads LATEST STORIES View commentslast_img read more

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Klisura, Foton target 7th victory

first_imgThe Fatted Calf and Ayutthaya: New restos worth the drive to Tagaytay Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games MRT 7 on track for partial opening in 2021 After 30 years, Johnlu Koa still doing ‘hard-to-make’ quality breads View comments Nazareth inaugural girls’ volley champ The Tigresses, who are getting the on-court lessons they need for the coming UAAP season, are winless in six starts while the Tornadoes created a three-way gridlock with the Petron Blaze Spikers and F2 Cargo Movers on top at 6-1.“We want to finish the eliminations on top,” said Foton coach Moro Branislav.Cocolife (3-3) and Sta. Lucia Realty (1-5) battle in the other match at 4:15 p.m..A top finish in the single-round eliminations would pit the No. 1 team against the No. 8; No. 2 against No. 7; No. 3 against No. 6; and No. 4 against No. 5.ADVERTISEMENT Malditas save PH from shutout Hotel says PH coach apologized for ‘kikiam for breakfast’ claim Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. center_img Even Sara Klisura was surprised upon finding out she scored a Philippine Superliga record 41 points.“Wow! 41 points?!” said the 25-year-old open spiker while looking at the score sheets after leading two-time defending champion Foton over erstwhile unbeaten F2 Logistics in Batangas City over the weekend.ADVERTISEMENT Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’ MOST READ LATEST STORIES “I don’t usually count,” added the Serbian, who turned pro when she was 18 and has seen action for Russia, Italy and Romania in the European League.Klisura eclipsed the record of American Kristy Jaeckel, who made 40 playing for Petron three seasons ago.Incidentally, that earned Jaeckel the nickname “Jae-Kill,” very similar to what local writers have coined for Klisura: “Kill-Sura.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSBoxers Pacquiao, Petecio torchbearers for SEA Games opening“It’s not very important for me,” said Klisura of her scoring binge in the ongoing Chooks to Go-PSL Grand Prix. “The important thing for me is to make sure we get the championship.”That stern, no-fancy attitude will be front and center when Foton takes on lightweight Victoria Sports-UST at 7 p.m. on Tuesday at Filoil Flying V Center. Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next ‘A complete lie:’ Drilon refutes ‘blabbermouth’ Salo’s claims Jordan delivers on promise: 2 Cobra choppers now in PHlast_img read more

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Sloppy offense doomed Ginebra, says Slaughter

first_imgHotel says PH coach apologized for ‘kikiam for breakfast’ claim Effort pays off as Blackwater neutralizes Ginebra’s height advantage Ginebra Gin Kings. Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netFor Greg Slaughter, Ginebra’s 94-77 shock loss to Blackwater boiled down to one thing—poor execution on offense.It was Blackwater’s first victory against Ginebra in the PBA Philippine Cup and Slaughter admitted the Elite just had their way against the Gin Kings.ADVERTISEMENT “We didn’t really make it hard on them with our offense,” said Slaughter Friday at Mall of Asia Arena. “We had just 30 something points (33) in the first half and they took advantage of us every time with their offense.”What it lacked in size against Ginebra, Blackwater made up for in speed and sheer guts to punish the Gin Kings in transition.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSBoxers Pacquiao, Petecio torchbearers for SEA Games openingSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingThe 6-foot-7 JP Erram and 6-foot-4 Mac Belo both scored 22 points as the two ran circles around Japeth Aguilar and Slaughter who stand 6-foot-9 and 7-feet, respectively.Blackwater’s fast-paced offense played to the tune of 16 fast break points and 29 points off turnovers. PH military to look into China’s possible security threat to power grid Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’ ‘A complete lie:’ Drilon refutes ‘blabbermouth’ Salo’s claims “Every time we had a sloppy offensive possession, they pushed it to the other side,” said Slaughter whose team turned the ball over 21 times. “It’s tough when they spread the offense, and also our main problem was our execution on offense.”Slaughter also commended how Erram, his former teammate in the UAAP with Ateneo, matched up with him despite their substantial size difference.“Poy’s good, we’re both from Ateneo, so I know how hard he works so I wasn’t surprised,” said Slaughter who finished with 20 points and 10 boards. “He continued to work hard and hard work always pays off.”ADVERTISEMENT MOST READ LATEST STORIEScenter_img Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games BeautyMNL open its first mall pop-up packed with freebies, discounts, and other exclusives Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. View comments Do we want to be champions or GROs? – Sotto ‘We cannot afford to fail’ as SEA Games host – Duterte SEA Games: PH still winless in netball after loss to Thaislast_img read more

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Michael Schumacher showing small signs of progress, says spokeswoman Sabine Kehm

first_imgAnd last month, Schumacher’s family said they were confident that the racing legend who defied death more than once on the track would pull through.Michael Schumacher is “showing small signs of progress”, his spokeswoman has said, with the Formula One legend slowly recovering from devastating brain injuries suffered in a ski accident.”There are short moments of consciousness and he is showing small signs of progress,” Schumacher’s manager Sabine Kehm told German broadcaster ARD on Sunday.”There are moments when he is awake and moments when he is conscious, which make us happy and give us great courage.”Of course I am not a doctor, but medically, there is a distinction between being awake and being conscious, the latter meaning there is an ability to interact with his surroundings.”I don’t want to disclose details out of respect for the family, but we have no doubt at all in the abilities of the doctors treating Michael, they are experts in their field.”Kehm stressed that any interaction with Schumacher is “on a very limited basis” and added that “a medical prognosis is not possible” due to the nature of his brain injury.Schumacher has been in a medically induced coma in Grenoble, France, since being badly injured in a ski accident on December 29 in the French resort of Meribel with his son and friends.Kehm said Schumacher’s family have been touched by a deluge of tributes and support from fans of the racing driver, but constant media speculation, particularly in German newspapers, has caused the family some anguish.advertisement”What upsets the family most is media quoting doctors who are not treating Michael and untruths are constructed from these,” said Kehm, who has been in Grenoble nearly every day since the accident.”It has been a problem when outsiders comment and it means we have to set the record straight, even when we don’t want to.”The 45-year-old Schumacher underwent two operations in the days after the accident to remove life-threatening blood clots before being placed into a coma.The family announced at the end of January that drugs used to keep him in his deep sleep were being reduced with a view to bringing him back to consciousness.In February, his friend and former Ferrari teammate Felipe Massa was quoted as saying that Schumacher seemed to respond to him during a visit.”He is sleeping, he looks normal and he showed a few responses with his mouth,” Massa told German tabloid Bild.And last month, Schumacher’s family said they were confident that the racing legend who defied death more than once on the track would pull through.Schumacher survived a motorbike accident in Spain in 2009, during which he suffered head and neck injuries but was released from hospital after just five hours.Kehm once again asked that the privacy of Schumacher’s wife Corinna and their two children be respected, while thanking well-wishers for their support.last_img read more

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