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stop. reset. Playwright Regina Taylor on the Uncertain Future of Technology & How Books Shaped Her Life

first_img Ames, whose only heir has died, begins to think the young J may have insight into preserving his legacy. The only problem is that J, a disconnected soul, has no interest in the past. Ames tries to negotiate with J to embed himself into the future. Related Shows About the author: Over the last three decades, Regina Taylor has had not one, but three versatile careers as an acclaimed actress, playwright and director. On the Great White Way, for example, Taylor has the distinction of being the first black woman to play Juliet in Romeo and Juliet. On the small screen, she garnered a Golden Globe Award and an Emmy nomination for her portrayal of housekeeper and civil rights activist Lilly Harper in I’ll Fly Away. As a playwright, she penned and directed the 2002 musical Crowns, a coming-of-age story accompanied by gospel and hip-hop music. This season, Taylor is back off-Broadway at Signature Theatre Company as writer and director of stop. reset., an ensemble drama that explores the inevitability of a future without books. Below, she recounts the inspiration for her new passion project and remembers her own childhood fascination with literature. E-books are now outselling physical books. Soon there may be no more bookstores or libraries. Schools are switching to computers. Young people growing up may not have the experience of actual books. What does that mean in terms of how we look at the world? What will take the place of books—a means of passing on history and memory—in a world where legacy can be deleted? I became fearful of the prospect. stop. reset. I started looking around. Across the street from where I live—my favorite bookstore, where I would browse every other day—closed its doors. It is when he begins to have a conversation with J—a 19-year-old janitor—that things take a turn. J is semiliterate—and the most tech-savvy person in the office. Everyone assumes they know where J is from. He is the present day incarnation of Ralph Ellison’s Invisible Man. As Ames and J wrestle with each other’s perspectives, the play rushes into the surreal and sci-fi of our present future. The play lives on stage at Signature Theatre through amazing collaborators: designers Neil Patel (set), Shawn Sagady (projections), Karen Perry (costumes), Rob Kaplowitz (sound) and Lap Chi Chu (lights); amazing actors Carl Lumbly, Ismael Cruz Cordova, LaTanya Jackson, Teagle Bougere, Michi Barall and Donald Mackay. All have brought their unique voices to create a shared language. Suddenly I felt like my Grandma, who didn’t believe man had walked on the moon, saying, “Can’t see nobody up there,” when she looked into the night sky—searching. And at a certain point she refused to be shoved onto another contraption. Done. stop. reset. is about Alexander Ames, owner of Alexander Ames Chicago Black Book Publisher. He is on a deadline demanded by a clause in a recent merger. He must adapt or become extinct. He is challenged to get the company up to speed with technology. He must also cut staff when the staff has already been cut to the bone. Ames begins to question each of his workers, all of whom are 40 and over, to see whose position is obsolete. Each represents the multiple constructs of identity. Ames has to question himself on this day, as businessman, African-American, husband and father. He has to question all the traditions and principles on which he stands. Books, to me, are vessels of history and memory. They have helped define who I am. As a child, one of my earliest memories was being on the floor with my mother with construction paper, crayons and scissors—writing my own children’s books. I don’t think I was more than five. My mother empowered me in teaching me how to imagine worlds through my own lens and make them concrete—a survival tool for an African-American female born of a single mother in the south. This tool helped me to create my own names, as the world is constantly naming me even before my first breath. We have a tendency to look at others through the lens of history and memory. Certain assumptions grab hold beyond our own memory and history. Certain things we want to hold onto. Other things we want to let go—and write our own. Breaking open a book is like standing on cracking ice. You fall through and travel backward and forward in time, submerged in the life of someone you think is different than you. Last page, you return to yourself with different eyes. stop. reset. takes place a few months from now. It is the end of 2013. Chicago. We are in the second term of our first African-American president. We are marking the 50th anniversaries of the March on Washington and the bombings in Birmingham. Gay marriage rights were set before the Supreme Court this year;  abortion rights for women were argued in Texas. People are questioning if we are moving forward or backward. I was blown away when Jim Houghton, founder of Signature Theatre, gave me a call with the offer of becoming part of “Residency Five.” Signature would commission me to write three plays that they would produce over a five-year period. Writers in residency five include Will Eno, Annie Baker, Martha Clarke, Katori Hall, Brandon Jacobs-Jenkins and Kenneth Lonergan. What a great opportunity as a writer! Houghton encouraged me to think outside the box. Where to begin? What did I need to say? View Comments Cell phones, iPads, Google Glass, Twitter, 3-D copying machines, cyborg enhancements, cochlear implants, pacemakers, embedded technology, the drive to inhabit Mars. The trajectory of change in this moment is astronomical. How can we keep up? And in adapting, who do we become? What do we hold on to? What can we afford to let go of? stop.reset. also lives through students I’ve worked with from Chicago Urban League, SAIC, DePaul University and Columbia College as well as New York’s Theater Development Fund and Rosie’s Kids. Through a series of workshops the students had dialogues about the play and created their own pieces in response. What they created is featured at the Signature Theatre and at stop-reset.com. It is a play that challenges boundaries of how we experience theater in this high tech age.  Show Closed This production ended its run on Sept. 29, 2013last_img read more

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First Look! Ridley’s New Aero Noah FB with Integrated Brakes on Frame, Fork

first_imgF Brake Video shows the integrated brakes.The new F Split Fork with aero slits to reduce turbulence at the front wheel.F Surface patches use a rough surface treatment to create a bit of an eddy at the front of the tube which makes the air hug the back of the tube closer. Ridley’s launching their completely new Noah FB aero road bike today claiming to be the first bicycle with brakes completely integrated into the frame and fork.We’ve seen bikes like the Storck with brakes built into the frame and fork as bolt-on components, but Ridley’s is the first to completely mold the stoppers directly into the frame and fork. We’ve got pics and more specs coming, but wanted to get these videos up as we got them. Teaser above, and three more detailed movies after the break…last_img read more

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Loss of Y chromosome is a risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease

first_imgShare on Twitter Share Share on Facebook The loss of the Y chromosome in batches of blood cells over time continues to develop as one biological explanation for why men, on average, live shorter lives than women. Researchers reporting May 23, 2016 in the American Journal of Human Genetics found that men with blood samples showing loss of chromosome Y developed Alzheimer’s as often as people born with genes that put them at the most risk for the disease. The work will be presented at the annual conference of the European Society of Human Genetics.“Most genetic research today is focused on inherited gene variants — mutations that are inherited by the offspring, but what we’re looking at are postzygotic mutations that are acquired during life,” says senior author Lars Forsberg, a researcher in the Department of Immunology, Genetics, and Pathology at Uppsala University in Sweden. “Using new tools to analyze genetic variations that accumulate with age, we can help explain how sporadic diseases like cancer or Alzheimer’s manifest,” says first author Jan Dumanski.One such postzygotic mutation found in the cells of biological males is the loss of the Y chromosome in a degree of blood cells. Loss of Y occurs in up to 17 percent of men and is more likely to be found in older men and men who smoke. This study expands on the idea that loss of Y, already a known risk factor for cancer (10.1038/ng.2966), could be a predictive biomarker for a wider range of poor health outcomes, specifically Alzheimer’s. Why loss of Y can be linked to an increased risk for disease remains unclear, but the authors speculate it has to do with reduced immune system performance. Emailcenter_img Pinterest LinkedIn The researchers looked at over 3,000 men to ascertain whether there was any predictive association between loss of Y in blood cells and Alzheimer’s disease. The participants came from three long-term studies that could provide regular blood samples: the European Alzheimer’s Disease Initiative, the Uppsala Longitudinal Study of Adult Men, and the Prospective Investigation of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors. Across the datasets, those with the highest fraction of blood cells without a Y chromosome were consistently more likely to be diagnosed with Alzheimer’s.“Having loss of Y is not 100 percent predictive that you will have either cancer or Alzheimer’s,” Forsberg says, adding that there were men in the study who had the mutation and lived with no symptoms well into their 90s. “But in the future, loss of Y in blood cells can become a new biomarker for disease risk and perhaps evaluation can make a difference in detecting and treating problems early.”Forsberg, Dumanski, and colleagues will next investigate the effect of loss of Y in larger cohorts and explore in greater detail how it confers risk for specific types of cancers and disease. They also plan to look at the cellular changes caused by loss of Y and how it affects different types of blood cells.last_img read more

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Gerald Eve: Legal and Parliamentary Evebrief

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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Watch the skies

first_imgTo continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community Subscribe now for unlimited access Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletterslast_img read more

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New GAC logistics company to serve Norwegian energy sector

first_img“GAC has logistics operations offices in key locations between Oslo in the south and Hammerfest in the north,” explains Gunnar Lundgren, Regional Logistics Manager. “These, and others to follow, are strategically located to optimise our services to the offshore oil and gas and other energy related industries in Norway, and to provide project logistics services.” Based at the company’s head office in Mongstad near Bergen, managing director of GAC Logistics (Norway) is Ahmet Özsoy.last_img read more

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Success builds on solid foundations

first_imgINTRO: Switzerland’s major programme of infrastructure upgrades is being implemented on the basis of market-driven projects, carefully tailored to contribute to an overall improvement in the speed, capacity and ease of use of the rail network. Paul Moser, SBB’s Manager, Major Projects, revealed to Reinhard Christeller why the SFr7·4bn Bahn 2000 programme is a success story in the makingMORE THAN 100 years after the first railways were built in Switzerland, its people voted on December 6 1987 in favour of a programme of major improvements to the country’s public transport system. Bahn 2000 was born, aiming to provide more frequent services at half-hourly intervals on most Intercity routes, as well as more through trains. Journey times between major cities were to be shortened by 15%, and by 8% across the Swiss Federal Railways network, with new trains and improved station facilities providing a better travelling environment for passengers. Twelve years later, more than half of the individual projects have been completed, and many of the improvements promised by Bahn 2000 are already a daily reality. ’Once we had made up our mind on what kind and level of service we wanted to offer, we had to define the best measures to bring them into being’, says SBB’s Manager, Major Projects, Paul Moser. ’First we only thought of building new lines, but costs skyrocketed to SFr20bn and we found out that capacity could be increased considerably by simpler measures such as resignalling the busiest routes to reduce headways from 3to 2min.’ Double-deck Intercity trains with up to 1400 seats further increase line capacity, and converting virtually all trains into push-pull units with the subsequent reduction of shunting movements helps increase capacity for incoming and outgoing trains at major stations. ’On lines where speed and not capacity is the critical factor, tilting trains with 470 seats are the answer’, says Moser.Cheaper solutionsThe basis for Bahn 2000 was laid down in 1982 when SBB introduced a network-wide regular-interval timetable. The idea was to convert major stations into hubs where all trains arrive shortly before the hour or half-hour and all leave a few minutes later, allowing all possible connections between services without a long wait for the passenger. This required journey times of less than 1h between the hubs, and Bahn 2000 is completing the grid.From this general requirement, SBB was able to determine where new lines would have to be built and where other less costly measures would suffice. Taking inflation into account, the SFr5·4bn allocated to Bahn 2000 by the federal government in 1987 is now worth SFr7·4bn. With over 85% of Bahn 2000 projects completed or with contracts let, SBB expects the total cost to be SFr6·4bn and hopes to achieve further reductions.Bringing the cost of the project down will have a significant impact on SBB’s bottom line. Back in 1987, it was accepted that investment required under the Bahn 2000 programme would increase SBB’s annual deficit by SFr330m. But it was only on November 29 1998 that voters decided in a referendum where the money to fund Bahn 2000 and other major rail projects should come from, namely two-thirds of the SFr30·5bn to be raised in lorry and petrol taxes, evenly distributed over 20 years.To keep its deficit under control, SBB’s contribution to Bahn 2000 could only be 25% of the total cost at most. Even with the capital cost of Bahn 2000 revised downwards and ridership expected to increase once all projects are completed, the latest calculations indicate that the programme will have a negative impact on SBB finances, but the funding gap has narrowed from SFr330m to SFr40m. The total cost of Bahn 2000 will be reviewed again in 2001 and 2005, and SBB hopes that the current upward trend in passenger traffic and further cost reductions will bring the shortfall closer to zero.Staged introductionBahn 2000 is being introduced in stages, with a major improvement for customers introduced every two years. In 1997, the first IC-2000 double-deck trains entered service, and work to rebuild Aarau station was completed. The 6·3 km Grauholz tunnel on the Zürich – Bern main line had been completed in 1995, enabling half-hourly service to be provided throughout the day between Fribourg, Bern, Zürich and St Gallen. This boosted ridership by 12%.Routes into Luzern were upgraded in 1999, enabling the introduction of a half-hourly Zürich Airport – Luzern service operated with double-deck rolling stock. Direct Genève – Luzern trains were reintroduced.This year should see the first ICN tilting trains running between Zürich and Lausanne via Biel. Following the completion of double-tracking along Lake Neuchâtel, journey times on this line will equal those via Bern, and alternate departures will provide two direct trains every hour between Zürich, Lausanne and Genève.In 2003 a new double-track alignment between Zürich and Thalwil will increase capacity and reduce journey times to Luzern and Chur, thus making the Vereina line serving the tourist destination of the lower Engadine valley even more attractive (RG 11.99 p707). This project will also help to separate long-distance traffic from Zürich S-Bahn trains, providing more capacity for both.The Bahn 2000 programme will be completed in 2005. The missing link between Zürich and Bern, the 45 km Mattstetten – Rothrist cut-off, will allow 15min to be cut from the present journey time, bringing it down to under 1h. Bern and a few minor cities will become fully-fledged hubs for regular-interval services, and the integration of timetables will be complete. Further enhancements to Bahn 2000 are planned between 2010 and 2020; SFr5·9bn of financing has been agreed, but the projects have not yet been defined. After a slow start in the 1980s, when funding had yet to be secured, Bahn 2000 projects are now under way at full speed. All projects are reported to be on schedule with costs well under control. Amongst the major projects, Mattstetten – Rothrist has been priced at SFr1·6bn, more than 21% of the cost of Bahn 2000. Together with a 4·5 km second track between Killwangen-Spreitenbach and Dietikon due for completion in 2002-03, the new link should provide a second double-track route between Zürich and Bern, equipped with ERTMS/ETCS signalling for a maximum speed of 200 km/h. For alignment and environmental reasons, almost 14 km will be in tunnel, including the 4·7 km Murgenthal tunnel completed in October 1998. Four junctions with the existing line will allow flexibility of operation and maximise the capacity benefits, with the line to Lausanne via Biel using part of the new alignment.Capacity improvements in the Zürich area are costing SFr1·3bn. As the number of trains entering and leaving Zürich HB will rise by almost 40% (RG 12.98 p857), the tracks into Switzerland’s busiest station must be untangled. The main problem is posed by the Basel – Chur service that at present arrives using the northernmost track into the station and must cross over to leave on the southern side, blocking all other train movements. A new line from Zurich-Altstetten and a flyover to segregate this movement from other trains will be built by 2005.Although the present 1400 train movements a day at Zürich HB will be increased, by converting all trains to push-pull operation, the 5 000 daily shunting movements will be reduced to a minimum. By using double-deck rolling stock, platform and train lengths will not be increased beyond 14 cars or 420m.Most of the lines feeding into Zürich are also being upgraded. Apart from the additional 10·7 km line to Thalwil, of which 9·4 km is in tunnel, a third track will be added between Tlast_img read more

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Betting board bans gambling adverts, celebrity endorsements

first_img“To show that we are serious, all betting licences in the country stand suspended effective July 1, 2019 unless the holders pay all their taxes,” Dr Matiang’i said on April after meeting the board. A billboard advertising a popular sports betting site is seen along a highway in Nairobi, on November 8, 2017. The popularity of football, among other sports betting is fast rising across Kenya and Africa in unprecedented fashion, with a share of the unemployed seeking out the new craze as a substitute for employment aided by the ease of betting on mobile phone applications. / AFP PHOTO / TONY KARUMBA (Photo credit should read TONY KARUMBA/AFP/Getty Images) Kenya announces new sports betting regulations Related International bans hurting Hawala operators The warning message, Mr Wambua said, “must constitute a third of the actual advertisement and be of the same font”.If implemented to the letter, the new rules will bar local celebrities such as Macdonald Mariga, Joey Muthengi, Janet Wanja, and Carol Radull from appearing in gaming related adverts. The new rules come barely a month after Interior Minister Fred Matiang’i ordered the board to oversee that betting firms comply with the rules. A billboard advertising a popular sports betting site is seen along a highway in Nairobi, on November 8, 2017.The popularity of football, among other sports betting is fast rising across Kenya and Africa in unprecedented fashion, with a share of the unemployed seeking out the new craze as a substitute for employment aided by the ease of betting on mobile phone applications.(Photo: TONY KARUMBA/AFP/Getty Images)Kenya’s betting control board has dealt a blow to the flourishing gambling industry with a raft of new measures it says are meant to protect the public from addiction. The new regulations are likely hit the betting industry hard, coming amidst a protracted court battle over taxation of winnings.center_img The minister said up to 76 percent of young people in Kenya are involved in gambling. “We wish to remind you that gaming is a demerit good and all demerit goods have the potential to harm the customer with the possibility of leading to addiction as well as some disorder,” Mr Wambua said. He said some betting companies take advantage of and are exploiting Kenyans, especially the youth. They include outdoor and social media adverts, TV ads from 6am to 10pm, and endorsement of bets and their firms by celebrities. Capetown bans dogs on beaches “It has further been decided that any form of advertisement of gambling must be approved and such an advertisement must contain a warning message about the consequences of gambling including its addictiveness,” said Liti Wambua, Betting Board’s acting director. In a directive issued on April 30, the board banned many forms of advertising that have been helping gambling firms woo clients.last_img read more

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Simeon Albert re-elected as chairman

first_img 106 Views   7 comments LocalNews Simeon Albert re-elected as chairman by: – October 8, 2013 Simeon AlbertIncumbent chairman, Simeon Albert has been re-elected chairman of the Canefield Urban Council.Mr Albert, who obtained 174 votes at the election which was held on September 16th, was re-elected by the eight- member Council with five votes.The other contender for the Chairman position was Michael Coipel who obtained 189 votes at the elections and three votes from the councilors on Tuesday.The other councilors are as follows; Michael Coipel, Michael Timothy, Joyce Dupuis, Jefferson Mc Pherson and the three members appointed by Community Development Minister; Irma Lafond, Franklyn Fabien and Jerry Abraham.The Council, which will be inaugurated on 15th October, will serve for three years.This is Mr Albert’s fifth consecutive term as chairman of the Council.There has been controversy by some members of the community regarding the performance of Mr Albert. The issue of roads and the lighting of streets in the community are some of the major areas which has been largely criticized by the individuals. Mr Albert announced last week that a $65,000.00 contract was signed recently for the rehabilitation a portion of road within the community. He also told Dominica Vibes that government is also expected to assistance in the restoration process of the road leading to the Canefield Industrial Site. Dominica Vibes Newslast_img read more

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Hydromet network for Dominica

first_img Sharing is caring! (GIS) A hydrometeorolocal network is being pursued for Dominica as part of the Pilot Programme for Climate Resilience.This is the latest development in the implementation of the US $38m Pilot Programme for Climate Resilience funded with assistance from the World Bank.A hydromet network collects remote field data and transmits it via satellite to provide real-time water management capability. Hydromet data is then integrated with other sources of information to provide forecasting and current runoff conditions for river and reservoir operations.A contract was award to Fred Ogden of Wyoming State University to undertake technical analysis of a national hydromet network, prepare instruments for such a network and draft a framework for its use in Dominica.The network will allow Dominica to give real time weather reports.“This system will enable us to see what’s coming and help us make a prediction within one or two hours as compared to the system which we now use which requires us to wait about three hours,” explained Colin Guiste, Coordinator of the Pilot Programme for Climate Resilience in Dominica.World Bank officials and representatives from the Ministry of Health and Environment engaged stakeholders on Tuesday March 17th to review the project as well as to prioritize aspects of the project.Ogden will be on island next week to present his findings to stakeholders. Share 176 Views   no discussions Sharecenter_img Tweet LocalNews Hydromet network for Dominica by: Government Information Service – March 20, 2015 Sharelast_img read more

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