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Feucht is SLC tennis Player of the Year

first_img Feucht and Shankles highlight an all-conference team dominated by the Red and White. LU had seven individuals earn postseason honors, including all six of its regular starters. LU had four first-team selections in singles as well as four first-team honorees in doubles.Feucht becomes the third Cardinal in the history of the program to be named Southland Player of the Year, and the first since Filip Kanczula in 2008. Feucht took first-team honors at No. 1 singles. He was joined on the first team by sophomore Benny Schweizer (No. 4 singles), juniors Jeandre Hoogenboezem (No. 5) and Juuso Laitinen (No. 6). Classmate Nikita Lis garnered second-team recognition at No. 2 singles. Feucht and Schweizer also locked up first-team All-SLC honors at No. 1 doubles, while Lis garnered a first-team nod with partner Hoogenboezem at line two. The duo of Laitinen and freshman Sebastian Santibanez earned second-team all-conference honors at No. 3 doubles.center_img FRISCO – Lamar junior Michael Feucht has been named Southland Conference Player of the Year, league officials announced Thursday afternoon. In addition to Feucht’s honor, LU head coach Scott Shankles has been named Southland Men’s Tennis Coach of the Year.last_img read more

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Rachel Tucker & More to Lead West End Premiere of Come From Away

first_img Casting is set for the London debut of Come From Away. As previously announced, the hit Broadway musical will begin an open run at the West End’s Phoenix Theatre on January 30, 2019 on the heels of an Ireland engagement at Dublin’s Abbey Theater from December 6, 2018 through January 19, 2019. Christopher Ashley will repeat his Tony-winning work as the musical’s director, with Kelly Devine as choreographer and Ian Eisendrath as music supervisor.The cast will include Wicked alum Rachel Tucker (Beverley Bass, Annette and others), Jenna Boyd (Beulah and others), Nathanael Campbell (Bob and others), Clive Carter (Claude and others), Mary Doherty (Bonnie and others), Robert Hands (Nick, Doug and others), Helen Hobson (Diane and others), Jonathan Andrew Hume (Kevin J, Ali and others), Harry Morrison (Oz and others), Emma Salvo (Janice and others), David Shannon (Kevin T, Garth and others) and Cat Simmons (Hannah and others), with Mark Dugdale, Bob Harms, Kiara Jay, Kirsty Malpass, Tania Mathurin, Alexander McMorran, Brandon Lee Sears and Jennifer Tierney.Come From Away is based on the true story of the isolated community of Gander, Newfoundland, which played host to thousands of people carried on 38 planes from across the globe when diverted to Gander’s airstrip on September 11, 2001. Undaunted by culture clashes and language barriers, the people of Gander cheered and supported the stranded travelers.Come From Away features a Tony-nominated book and score by Irene Sankoff and David Hein. The London and Ireland productions will feature the work of the full Broadway design team: scenic designer Beowulf Boritt, costume designer Toni-Leslie James, lighting designer Howell Binkley and sound designer Gareth Owen. View Comments Star Files Rachel Tucker Check out footage from the Broadway production below. The West End cast of Come From Away(Photo: Helen Maybanks) Rachel Tucker(Photo: Caitlin McNaney for Broadway.com)last_img read more

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Amazon’s Mayday button could revolutionize banking

first_img 1SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr by. Jim MarousIt’s time for banks and credit unions to consider the potential of providing mobile banking customers single-click live customer support similar to Amazon’s Mayday button that is embedded on the latest Kindle Fire HDX tablets.Similar to a virtual version of Apple’s store-based Genius Bar, without needing to wait in line or leave your house, a banking version of Mayday could provide both basic customer support as well as specialized or advisory services that could revolutionize both mobile and online banking.This concept may seem like a major leap into the future for an industry that has yet to fully embrace 24×7 ‘push to talk’ or text-based customer support for the mobile or online customer or extensive video banking at physical locations, but as technology advances and more customers are relying on mobile, tablet and online banking, there is significant potential. And, with the desire to create powerful emotional connections with customers, live video may replace the telephone for customer support.The Amazon service is easily accessible with a button on the Kindle HDX device home page. Press the Mayday engagement button and a customer sees a remote Amazon Tech Advisor on their screen within seconds (over the holidays, Amazon beat their goal of 15 second response with a 9 second average wait). While a customer can see the live advisor, the advisor can’t see the customer, just their screen. Once credentials are authorized, Tech Advisors can annotate the screen, change settings, download apps and do anything needed to help a customer step-by-step. continue reading »last_img read more

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November 15, 2006 News and Notes

first_img November 15, 2006 News & Notes News and Notes Fabienne Fahnestock of Gunster Yoakley became a member of the Planned Giving Council of the Broward Center for the Performing Arts. Robert F. Lewis of GrayRobinson in Ft. Lauderdale wrote a chapter in the upcoming book, Inside the Minds: Legal Strategies for Food and Drug Law.The American Board of Certification announced that Chad S. Bowen of Jennis, Bowen & Brundage in Tampa received its national certification in business bankruptcy law. John Christopher of Christopher & Weisberg was appointed chair of the Broward County Bar Association Corporate Counsel Section. John E. Lyncheski of Cohen & Grigsby was elected to the Florida Assisted Living Affiliation Board of Directors as associate member director-at-large. Stuart R. Morris of Morris Law Group presented “Transferring the Small Business” to the 2006 Life Insurance Fundamentals of Education Institute Program in Miami. Morris also held four regional meetings for South Florida Oppenheimer representatives on “Asset Preservation & Protection,” and spoke about “Annuities in Asset Protection” to the Palm Beach County Chapter of the Society of Financial Service Professionals. Seth Marmor of Shapiro, Blasi, Wasserman & Gora was named Together Against Gangs’ vice chair. TAG is a nonprofit organization whose mission is to reduce youth gang activity in Palm Beach County. Gary M. Bagliebter of Shutts & Bowen was awarded the Certified Anti-money Laundering Specialist designation by the Association of Anti-Money Laundering Specialists. David Pratt of Proskauer Rose in Boca Raton spoke on “Florida Traps for the Unwary: What Non-Florida Planners Need to Know about Florida Law” at the Estate Planning Council of St. Louis in St. Louis, Missouri. Christopher Boyett of Holland & Knight’s Miami office was named a fellow by the American College of Trust and Estate Counsel. Myrna Galligano of Holland & Knight’s Orlando office was appointed state legislative director for the 2007 HR Florida State Council, an organization representing human resource professionals. Ellen S. Morris of Elder Law Associates was appointed co-chair of the Elder Law Section of the South Palm Beach County Bar Association. Beth Greenfield-Mandler of Miami was sworn in by the United States Court of Appeals, 11th Circuit, as a circuit mediator. John S. Mills of Mills & Carlin received the 2006 S. Victor Tipton Award from the Academy of Florida Trial Lawyers for superior achievement in legal writing. Jim Wilkes was awarded the Resident’s Rights Award for his commitment to nursing home residents. The award will be given by the National Citizens Coalition for Nursing Home Reform at its annual convention in Washington, D.C. Sean M. Ellsworth spoke on Internet pharmacy prosecutions and Medicare/Medicaid fraud at the Southeastern Health Care Fraud Institute in Atlanta. Ken Spillias of Lewis, Longman & Walker was reappointed chair of the West Palm Beach Planning Board. Johanna Wills Clark of Carlton Fields’ Orlando office was elected to the board of directors of the Historical Society of Central Florida. Darren A. Schwartz of Rumberger, Kirk & Caldwell spoke at the 32nd Annual Public Employment Labor Relations Forum in Orlando on “Sovereign Immunity and 768.28 Caps,” which focused on the impact of caps on employment law claims brought against government entities. Dennis M. O’Hara of Wicker, Smith, O’Hara, McCoy, Graham & Ford’s Ft. Lauderdale office moderated the ABA’s Aviation Litigation Annual Conference in Washington, D.C. Douglas Jones of CCS Medical in Clearwater was appointed by Chief Justice Fred Lewis as a member of the Supreme Court Standing Committee on Fairness and Diversity. Christopher D. Brown of Cozen O’Connor’s Miami office lectured for the National Association of Mutual Insurers in Tampa, speaking on insurance bad faith, and for Ace Insurance in Chicago, speaking on Florida procedural issues. Allen R. Grossman of GrayRobinson’s Tallahassee office discussed legal issues relating to the evaluation and treatment of impaired health care professionals at the Professionals Resource Network Annual Facilitators and Treatment Providers Meeting on Amelia Island. Mike Gora of Shapiro, Blasi, Wasserman & Gora was named president of the board of trustees for the Boca Raton Museum of Art. David P. Bloch of Deloitte Financial Advisory Services in Washington, D.C., addressed the annual meeting of the Standard & Poors Worldwide Credit Analysts in New York about “What to do When Regulators Come Knocking at Your Door.” David Sampedro presented “Litigators Perspective: What Every Personal Injury Lawyer Needs to Know to Avoid the Insurance Company Crunch” in Seattle. Martin H. Cohen of Plantation was interviewed about “Senior Planning” on WPLG-TV. Luis A. “Tony” Cabassa was elected president of the Tampa Bay Hispanic Bar Association. John J. Copelan, Jr., general counsel of Florida’s Department of Children and Families, received the 2005 Nelson Award, which recognizes contributions to the ABA by a public lawyer. Thomas G. Pelham of Fowler White Boggs Banker received the President’s Award for Outstanding Contributions to the chapter at the annual conference of the Florida Chapter of the American Planning Association. Brett Alan Panter of Miami spoke at a seminar hosted by the National Business Institute on “Handling Medical Negligence Claims.” Kristin Adamson of Novey, Mendelson & Adamson was appointed to the Florida Supreme Court’s Committee on Access to Court Records. Diana Santa Maria became an adjunct professor of law at Nova Southeastern University College of Law, teaching civil pretrial practice this semester. Morgan R. Bentley of Williams Parker in Sarasota was elected to the American Bar Foundation as a fellow. J. Hugh Middlebrooks was named chair of the Economic Development Corporation of Sarasota County. November 15, 2006 News and Noteslast_img read more

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SRS Real Estate Partners Brings Edible Arrangements to Phoenix

first_imgEdible Arrangements has leased a 1,266 SF space located at the NWC of Greenway Road and Tatum Boulevard in Phoenix, SRS Real Estate Partners announced Tuesday. Other tenants in the center include Modern Grove and Firehouse Subs. Edible Arrangements plans to open in the next few months.Chuck Gibson with SRS Real Estate Partners represented the tenant, Edible Arrangements, in the transaction. Zach Pace with Phoenix Commercial Advisors represented the landlord, Jamel Greenway, LLC.last_img

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Can Bilingualism Counteract Effects of Poverty?

first_imgEducation Week: The bilingual brain is sharper than the monolingual one, more and more research is showing. People with fluency in at least two languages have better attention spans, enhanced memory, among other cognitive advantages.But do those same cognitive strengths show up in bilingual children who are low-income? In other words, can bilingualism help children in low-income communities overcome the enormous cognitive challenges that poverty presents?A soon-to-be published study from Pascale Engel de Abreu of the University of Luxembourg and colleagues takes a look at that very question. Their answer in a nutshell: yes. (You can read the unedited manuscript of the study which will be published soon in Psychological Science.)Read the whole story: Education Weeklast_img read more

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What’s in a profile picture? Just about everything, actually.

first_imgThe Washington Post:Love is definitely not blind, according to new statistics from the dating site OkCupid. In fact, not much online is: Facebook-friending, Twitter-sending — even professional networking is dictated, to an alarmingly huge degree, by the attractiveness of your profile picture.On Monday, Christian Rudder — OkCupid’s data guru, and the author of a forthcoming book about Big Data — published a blog post that claimed (among many other things) that pictures account for more than 90 percent of a profile’s popularity, far more than minor details like personality or shared interests.Read the whole story: The Washington Post More of our Members in the Media >last_img read more

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Students view gay professors as less qualified after listening to anti-gay rap music

first_imgEmail Share Share on Twitter The anti-gay rap music used in the study was “Where the Hood At” by DMX and “Punks Jump Up to Get Beat Down” by Brand Nubian.After completing the task, the students moved on to their next assignment. They were given the resumes and cover letters of two potential math professors and asked to evaluate the candidates’ competency to teach at the university.The researchers created two fake job candidates — Tyler Wollack and Kenneth Maddon — with similar experience and background. However, the resume of one of the fake candidates described his work in an LGBTQ organization and listed him winning an LGBTQ leadership award. The other fake candidate listed similar experience with a non-LGBTQ student organization.Whether Wollack or Maddon was described as the gay candidate varied from participant to participant. In other words, for half of the participants, Wollack was the gay candidate, while for the other half, Maddon was the gay candidate.Binder and Ward found that students who had listened to the rap music with anti-gay lyrics rated the pro-gay candidate as being less suitable for a math professor position compared to the two other groups of students. The first group of students also indicated they were less willing to attend the candidate’s office hours if he was hired.“Our analysis found that, even after controlling for demographic variables such as age, religiosity, country of birth, and regular rap consumption, exposure to heterosexist rap music remained a significant predictor of men’s perceptions of a gay male candidate’s qualifications and their willingness to attend his office hours,” the researchers said. LinkedIncenter_img Pinterest Share on Facebook Male college students exposed to rap music that disparages gay people are more likely to view a gay professor as being less qualified for his position, according to new research. The study, conducted by Kevin Binder and L. Monique Ward of the University of Michigan, was published in the Journal of Sex Research.“Workplace discrimination against gay men is a well-documented problem with observed negative outcomes for the discriminated. This study sought to test whether heterosexist media messages can cause men to engage in this kind of discrimination,” the researchers said.Binder and Ward recruited 171 heterosexual male college students for their study. The students were first instructed to perform a number of simple mathematical tasks for about 17 minutes. One group of students listened to rap music with anti-gay lyrics while completing the tasks, a second group listened to rap music without anti-gay lyrics, and a third group did not listen to any music.last_img read more

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Experts: Make polio vaccine a travel prerequisite for some

first_img IMB report summary Afghanistan has made steady but slow progress over the past 2 years, the report says. It calls the slow pace worrisome in the face of security risks as international troops withdraw from the country. “No country should allow a citizen from any endemic polio state to cross their border without a valid vaccination certificate,” it adds. The global polio count for this year stood at 193 cases on Nov 20, as compared with 536 at that time a year earlier and 650 for all of 2011, according to GPEI figures. This year’s count includes 104 cases in Nigeria, 54 in Pakistan, 30 in Afghanistan, and 5 in Chad. The IMB also recommends that polio immunization be linked with other health and neighborhood benefits whenever possible, since local residents fighting more obvious challenges like measles, malaria, and poor sanitation often see no benefit in polio vaccine alone. “Some will see this as [an] extreme move, but it is necessary. It is not the most extreme use of the International Health Regulations that could have been proposed,” the report states. The advice about requiring immunization for travelers from endemic polio countries tops the list of recommendations in the report. Another recommendation says that every district-level task force in affected countries should have a representative of parents in the area. GPEI polio case count chart The program “will now clearly not achieve this goal,” the panel said. “Despite it missing yet another deadline, the IMB judges the Programme’s prospects to be more positive than ever. If this level of progress had been achieved at the start, not the end, of the 2010-12 period, transmission could have been stopped by now.” Because 19 polio outbreaks have occurred since 2010 in countries that had previously eliminated the virus, it seems essential to ensure that people from countries where polio is still entrenched get vaccinated before they travel internationally, the IMB said. “We recommend that the International Health Regulations Expert Review Committee urgently issue a standing recommendation by May 2013 that will introduce pre-travel vaccination or vaccination checks in each of these countries until national transmission is stopped,” the report says. The report says Pakistan overhauled its polio program this year, and case numbers “plummeted” as a consequence. But an upcoming election and a complex security situation pose risks going forward. The Independent Monitoring Board (IMB), which monitors the GPEI on behalf of the World Health Organization (WHO), says in its November report that anyone from Afghanistan, Nigeria, or Pakistan should be required to be immunized before they can cross borders. Nigeria is the only country with more cases this year than last, the IMB says. It adds that Nigeria’s vaccination program may be on the verge of a breakthrough—but if case numbers are not reduced, spread to other countries is all but inevitable. Overall, the IMB report is positive about the progress of the polio battle, even though the GPEI will miss its 2010-12 goal of eradicating the disease by the end of this year. The report says the GPEI already knows the need for this approach, but “converting the rhetoric into substance” has proved difficult. Nov 28, 2012 (CIDRAP News) – A panel of experts that advises the Global Polio Eradication Initiative (GPEI) is recommending that residents of polio-endemic countries be required to have polio vaccinations before they are allowed to travel abroad. See also: Full text of IMB report “The end of 2012 will not bring the end of polio, but we may now be seeing the polio virus make its last stand,” says a summary of the report. “We urge the Polio Programme to identify in every local community, a priority service that can be delivered with polio vaccine—and ensure it is delivered,” the IMB says. In some cases already, vaccination programs have been paired with rubbish clearing and distribution of mosquito nets, the report adds.last_img read more

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Signs Of Gratitude Appear At Los Alamos Medical Center

first_imgSigns of gratitude greet frontline healthcare staff this morning at the entrance to Los Alamos Medical Center. Courtesy photoSigns of gratitude greet frontline healthcare staff this morning at the entrance to Los Alamos Medical Center. Courtesy photo Signs of gratitude greet frontline healthcare staff this morning at the entrance to Los Alamos Medical Center. Courtesy photo Signs of gratitude greet frontline healthcare staff this morning at the entrance to Los Alamos Medical Center. Courtesy photolast_img read more

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