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SMC seniors reflect on art comprehensive projects

first_imgTags: liz mcbride, senior art comprehensives Saint Mary’s recently exhibited the senior comprehensive projects of senior art majors Emily Engler, Colleen Donohue, Malea Schulte and Elizabeth McBride in Moreau Center for the Arts gallery.The four students’ work was part of the senior exhibitions that occur each spring semester. Student artwork is presented and evaluated by a panel of staff members in the art department, McBride said. Other students have a chance to witness the work as well, both as members of various art classes where they evaluate the work, and by simply walking through the galleries.McBride is a senior art history major, a specified division of the art department. Along with an exhibit showcased in the gallery, art history majors have to write a paper or analysis on a subject. As an artist as well as a musician, McBride said her paper took an interesting turn.“My topic was a visual culture analysis on videosongs,” McBride said. “These are videosongs of artists recording and illustrating their songs. In a way, it’s a subculture and its own genre of music. Since there is a visual element, I was able to analyze is for my art history comprehensive.”For the exhibition part of her comprehensive project, McBride displayed a visual reference of videosong artists executing their work. Even though this was smaller in size compared to other projects, she said that she still took a pride in her work and was proud of how far she had come.“I just sort of put it up without any explanation, but I won’t lie, I stopped and looked almost every time I passed by it. It was for posterity,” McBride said.Though having an exhibit in a gallery and an extensive paper may seem daunting, McBride said she learned many valuable lessons in the process.“My number one piece of advice to any student: work hard,” McBride said. “It isn’t simple, because there is a lot involved. You can work hard to get something done at the last minute, but you’re mostly getting that thing done … because it’s last minute. Working hard is a process that involves consistency and effort.”McBride said for underclassmen, this is a good technique to begin brainstorming ideas for senior comprehensive projects.“[This way,] by the time the capstone or theses projects rolls around, you’ll know essentially what to expect. You can’t avoid or escape the stress, but you’ll know what to expect since you know what you have to do and how to do it,” McBride said.Another rewarding part of these final projects comes in the form of knowing that there are people alongside you for the ride, she said.“I take so much pride in being able to call the other art majors my friends,” McBride said. “We were a support system in every way, and I can’t thank them enough for being there to hear me spiel about videosongs, other stressors and my general random commentaries.“I think that closeness helped each of us create extraordinary work. A good relationship brings the best out of people and that’s exactly what happened. [I have] too much gratitude, and I feel I can’t explain enough in words. Thank you, thank you, thank you.”last_img read more

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Gloria Ann Alfred

first_img Next UpShe retired from the Port Arthur Independent School District with 16 years of service.She leaves to cherish her memory, one sister, Mary Alfred Cary; two brothers, Johnny Alfred Jr (Glenda Faye) and Ronald Alfred (Glenda Kay); and two godsons, Paul Knox, Jr. and Byron Alfred.A visitation will be held on Saturday, October 17, 2020 from 12:00 pm to 2:00 pm with services immediately following at the Gabriel Funeral Home Chapel, located at 3800 Memorial Blvd., Port Arthur, TX 77642. Elder Kevin T. Domingo, Sr. will be officiating.Entombment will follow at Live Oak Cemetery under the direction of Gabriel Funeral Home. Gloria Ann Alfred, 72, Port Arthur, TX answered God’s call on Thursday, October 8, 2020.She was born on May 26, 1948 to the late Johnny Alfred, Sr. and Gustavia Jack Alfred, in Baldwin, LA.She was a lifelong resident of Port Arthur, TX and a graduate of the Abraham Lincoln High School Class of 1966.last_img read more

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Light Up More than the Road with the The Unique Ding Bike Light

first_imgThe Ding is a fairly compact unit measuring 2″ wide, 3″ long and 1.6″ deep and weighing in at 110g. It uses a rotating clamp that hangs either under your handlebars or your stem to ensure the downward beam isn’t blocked. The strap connects to a light holster so you can quickly un-clip the light itself and leave the clamp behind. The universal strap mount adjusts between 20-40mm to fit on nearly any bar or stem and was designed to be easy to install, even in complete darkness. The Ding comes with a spare silicon strap so you’re not left in the dark if yours happens to break.The Ding’s forward beam is projected by two LED’s, and maxes out at 400 lumens. The lenses are an angled cut-off type to reduce forward glare, and are designed to eliminate hot spots. The downward beam projects at up to 150 lumens, and illuminates an area 10′ wide and 5′ deep centered around the rider.A single button controls the Ding by scrolling through the light’s five different modes. The largest battery possible was used to provide good burn times, and although it should run for several years the battery is actually replaceable. The Ding charges by USB in 5 hours, and the battery’s charge port is protected from the elements by a rubber insert on the light holster. See the graphic below for the various modes and run times.The Ding has been tested for off-road trail riding, and can take the abuse of rough terrain. The company tested with a rider who used two Ding lights, which would output 800 lumens. There are far brighter lights available, so I’d suggest pairing a Ding with a stronger helmet light for full speed night riding. For commuters however, the Ding is a brilliant concept.The Ding light comes in either all grey or with green, blue or orange colored front bezels. The retail price will eventually be $92 USD, but currently Kickstarter supporters can still buy in for $72. The Ding’s Kickstarter campaign is on until Sat. June 27th, and if successful the first shipments are expected to go out around October.dinglights.com.au While cycling lights have become much brighter in the past few years, urban riders are looking in a whole different direction when it comes to light innovation- sideways. Recently Bikerumor previewed the Hueray light-up grips which follow this principle, but the Ding goes a step further and projects a large beam of light on the ground around you. The idea was hatched after the Ding’s creator Des Burns was almost hit by a motorist, who said they didn’t see him even though his front and rear lights were on.The Ding light has typical forward lighting for the cyclists visibility, but a separate light also projects downwards in a rectangular shaped beam that covers both sides of the rider to make you much more visible to drivers. The Ding’s Kickstarter campaign is already in full swing, but still needs some funding to go into production. Check out the details of the Ding below the break…last_img read more

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VEC’s net metering program full for 2016, will stay open for smaller systems through November 2015

first_imgVermont Electric Cooperative, Inc,Vermont Business Magazine In May, VEC reached its annual cap on net metering installations. To control the cost of the net metering program, the VEC Board of Directors voted not to exceed the annual cap, and VEC asked the Public Service Board (PSB) if VEC could continue accepting net metering applications in 2015 to count towards the 2016 annual cap. In September, the PSB gave its approval for this request. The PSB ruled that projects that submitted applications since June can construct in 2015 and even interconnect with VEC’s permission. Net metering is the program that allows members to install small-scale renewable generation such as solar panels and wind turbines.As of the beginning of November, VEC reached its annual cap for 2016. In a statment it said it will not be accepting any more projects larger than 15 kilowatts for 2016. However, it will continue to accept projects 15 kilowatts and smaller through November to accommodate members who have already begun the process of working with installers. Starting on December 1, 2015, the net metering program will close to all new projects for 2016.For projects larger than 15 kW starting now and projects 15 kW and smaller starting December 1, 2015, VEC plans to respond by asking the PSB to issue Certificates of Public Good with the following conditions: 1.) that the project not be constructed or interconnected until after January 1, 2017; 2.) that the rules of the net metering program that starts on January 1, 2017 will apply to these projects (the PSB will be issuing a draft rule soon); and 3.) if projects fall out of the 2015 or 2016 queue and space becomes available, VEC will notify applicants in the 2017 queue on a first come-first served basis.What does this mean for members who want to install solar?The way to reserve space in the net metering program is to submit a net metering application. Members interested in installing solar arrays 15 kilowatts and smaller in 2016 should submit an application in November to ensure a spot in the program. The application can be found on the PSB website. Members can also contact VEC at 1-800-832-2667 to receive an application by mail or email.The PSB ruled that members who apply in 2015 can proceed with construction as soon as their net metering application is approved. However, interconnection in 2015 cannot happen without approval from VEC. We are considering requests for interconnection as they come in.What is the net metering cap based on?In 2014, the legislature raised the net metering cap to 15 percent of a utility’s peak demand. When the law went into effect, VEC was at 4 percent of peak demand. The statute sets an additional 4 percent aside for VEC’s Co-op Community Solar project; and VEC is required to allocate the remaining 7 percent equally among 2014, 2015, and 2016 (ie 2.33 percent for each year).In 2017, there will be a new net metering program. The PSB will issue a draft of these rules in the next couple months.Vermont Electric Cooperative, Inc, a member-owned Cooperative founded in 1938, is Vermont’s third largest electric utility, serving approximately 34,000 members in rural Vermont.last_img read more

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ATEN Technology Releases New Additions to KE Series

first_imgATEN Technology announced new additions Tuesday to its KE Series of KVM over IP Extenders. The solutions are designed for: the broadcasting industry (post-production and live events), control room environments (air traffic control, 911 call centers, utilities process control centers), network operation centers, surveillance/command control centers, data centers and testing labs.ATEN KE9950/KE9952 4K DisplayPort Single Display KVM over IP ExtenderThese KVM over IP Extenders send HDMI KVM, audio, USB and serial via Cat5e/6 over a LAN or via an SFP fiber optic transceiver module over an optical Ethernet network.Features include:Video quality up to 4K (3840×2160@30Hz, 4:4:4); compatible with HDCPProvides fast-switching, secured data transmission (with AES 128-bit encryption) for flawless video quality, and visually lossless video compressionSupports both extender and matrix modes for multi-display installations and video wall applicationsPoE functionality (KE9952 only)ATEN KE6910 / KE6912 2K DVI-D Dual Link KVM over IP ExtenderThese are designed for the air traffic control (ATC) industry. ATEN’s DVI-D Dual Link Single Display KVM over IP Extenders have exclusive features, including 2Kx2K video resolution.Features include:Delivers video resolutions up to 2560×2048@50 Hz, including resolutions of 2560×1600@60Hz and 2048×2048@60HzAdaptive fast switching — automatically fast switches between different Tx video resolutions on an Rx display within 0.3 seconds“Push” and “pull” — share content instantly with one clickSupports power/network failover (two DC jacks for KE6910 and one DC jack + PoE for KE6912, one RJ45 and one SFP fiber for network failover)Connection Redundancy — automatically connects to another transmitter (Tx) after disconnection with the original Tx.Supports SFP fiber modules for up to 10-kilometer long-distance transmission, while the KE6912 features PoE functionalitySee related  ATEN Technology Launches HDMI to USB-C UVC Video Capture With PD3.0 Power Pass-ThroughStarting at $1,448, ATEN’s newest KVM over IP extenders are here:KE9950 (4K DisplayPort Single Display KVM over IP Extender)KE9952 (4K DisplayPort Single Display KVM over IP Extender with PoE)KE6910 (2K DVI-D Dual Link KVM over IP Extender)KE6912 (2K DVI-D Dual Link KVM over IP Extender with PoE)last_img read more

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5 budget killers you can avoid

first_img 2SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Creating a budget is the first step to taking control of your finances. Sticking to your budget is another challenge altogether.Even when you believe you have factored in every cost you may encounter by week, by month or by year, somehow you end up needing more money than you allocated. If this sounds like you, you are likely encountering a budget killer (or several). Below we have gathered some of the most common costs that can cause you to veer off your budgeting course.1. Account Maintenance FeesBanks and credit card companies often sneak in fees on every statement to “maintain” your account. Some charge you extra if you don’t maintain a certain balance, if you write too many checks or if you don’t make enough transactions. These can add up quickly. Read the specifics of your account agreement carefully. Look into which checking accounts and credit cards offer services that fit your lifestyle.2. SubscriptionsWhile seemingly low monthly fees can be attractive, subscription magazines and online portals add up. These costs are hurting your budget if you are not using the services or if you could find them elsewhere online for free. Eventually, these just become another of your slew of monthly payments so it’s a good idea every so often to re-evaluate whether yours are worth keeping. continue reading »last_img read more

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Wedding bells or single again: psychology predicts where your relationship is headed

first_imgShare Share on Twitter To know your relationship’s fate, the ups and downs may matter more than its quality at one specific moment. A newly published study examined this question by tracking how relationships progressed over time via people’s own changing senses of where things were headed.Charting the course of love, true or otherwiseSome days your relationship feels like it will be happily ever after, while other days it feels more like happily never after. Researchers call your sense of whether your relationship will eventually result in marriage your commitment to wed.If you could chart the story of your relationship, what would it look like? Maybe a straight, ascending line showing steady progress? Or maybe a curvy line showing that you’ve hit some bumps along the way? It’s this trajectory that may influence how your story will end.In the recent study, researcher Brian Ogolsky and colleagues hypothesized that how individuals’ commitment to wed fluctuated over time would predict future relationship outcomes. To test the idea, interviewers had 376 dating couples in their mid-20’s chart out graphs of how their sense of marriage likelihood (the vertical axis ranged from 0% to 100%) changed over time (time in months appeared on the horizontal axis).The interviewer plotted key dates, noting where the likelihood of marriage changed, for better or worse. For example, spending too much time with friends, fighting or just being too different could nudge commitment to wed down. Conversely, meeting the partner’s family, spending a lot of time together, having a lot in common and receiving positive feedback from friends or family could make commitment to wed rise.Participants updated their graphs via short interviews for each of the next seven months, concluding with a final interview nine months after the start of the study. Participants also provided information about changes in relationship status – such as transitioning from dating to broken up, from casual to serious dating, from serious dating to engaged, and so on.Researchers analyzed the graphs for the number of turning points or changes in commitment to wed, particularly noting any downturns or times when chances of marriage decreased. They also examined the slope or degree of change during turning points to see if things were escalating quickly, slowly eroding or following any of the other trajectories a relationship can take.Breaking commitment types into four groupsUsing participants’ monthly feedback, the researchers identified four distinct commitment patterns.Dramatic (34% of the sample) – This group had an “up and down” type of relationship, with more downturns and steeper changes in commitment than other groups. These individuals spent more time apart and had lower opinions of the relationship, and their families and friends were less supportive of their relationship.Partner-focused (30% of the sample) – This group had a “my partner is the center of my universe” approach to commitment and experienced very few downturns. Their changes in commitment hinged on how much time they could spend together.Socially involved (19% of the sample) – This group experienced very little variability, and fewer downturns than those in the dramatic and conflict-ridden groups. When changes occurred, they were largely determined by the amount of interaction with their social network and what those friends and family thought of the relationship.Conflict-ridden (12% of the sample) – This group includes the fighters. Like the dramatic group, this group had a large number of downturns. The sizes of the changes were not as steep, but they were disproportionately due to conflict in the relationship. Those in this cluster also reported fewer positive things to say about the relationship than those in the partner-focused group, and less support from family and friends than the socially involved group.Much like boiling your entire personality down into a color or series of letters, fitting your relationship into one of four tidy categories has intuitive appeal. Yet classification is simplification. Our relationships and psychological experiences are complex in a way that defies basic categories or groups; every relationship cannot fit neatly within these four categories. However, they provide one framework for understanding how relationships progress.So is my relationship doomed?Importantly, knowing how commitment to wed changed over time was a better predictor of relationship outcomes than the basic measure of relationship quality at the first interview.Individuals in the dramatic group were more than twice as likely to break up than any of the other three groups. Those in the partner-focused group were more likely to have their relationship progress (for instance, advancing from casual to serious dating) than those in the dramatic group, while the conflict-ridden group was more likely to keep their relationship status stable compared to the dramatic group.Taken together, these results suggest it is good to be partner-focused, but not dramatic. In other words, those who frequently experience substantial fluctuations in their commitment should have concerns about the relationship’s long-term sustainability. The dramatic group may be particularly susceptible to breakup because they maintain so much contact with their social network. Some of these pals may serve as “backburner” relationships in which the person maintains contact for the possibility of starting a later relationship.Relationships move at difference paces and in different patterns. Whether your relationship is moving quickly or slowly, smoothly or has been a bit rocky, this research demonstrates how your relationship’s past trajectory can offer a glimpse into its future.By Gary W Lewandowski Jr, Chair/Professor of Psychology , Monmouth UniversityThis article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. Is he or she the one? You know… the one to introduce to my parents, the one to move in with, the one to start a family with, the one to marry? At some point in every dating relationship, you ask yourself some version of these questions.Of course you’re invested in predicting the fate of your own relationship. Psychology researchers are interested as well. Are there recognizable signs that can foretell where a relationship is headed? Typically researchers have tried to puzzle out this question by measuring some aspect of a relationship at one moment in time and then seeing how that measurement coincides with relationship outcomes months or years later. For example, one group found that greater boredom now predicts less relationship satisfaction nine years later.These types of one-shot measurements are useful, but how you feel about any facet of your relationship fluctuates over time. Some researchers, including Ximena Arriaga at Purdue University, have suggested that the typical method of measuring a single moment in time may not fully capture the relationship experience; it might be more revealing to look at patterns of change as the relationship develops. Emailcenter_img LinkedIn Share on Facebook Pinterestlast_img read more

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NTN Realigns Automotive Aftermarket Sales Organization

first_img“We are excited to be adding Charles to our sales team,” said Kevin Judge, vice president of automotive aftermarket sales and marketing. “With years of sales experience in the field, Charles brings unparalleled expertise and leadership to this position. I am very positive that his automotive aftermarket knowledge will allow us to continue expanding our market presence.” Left: Charles Harris, director of automotive aftermarket sales; Right: Ed Magruder, director of special market sales Magruder has been instrumental in growing the automotive aftermarket business unit of NTN.  In this new role, Magruder is charged with developing and growing OES sales, auto and truck kitter business, the truck rebuilder business and special markets. Harris comes to NTN with a strong and diverse background in the automotive aftermarket industry. He has worked with numerous global companies such as Tenneco Automotive, TMD Friction, FTE Automotive and recently, ASC. In his new position, Harris is responsible for all automotive aftermarket sales for traditional automotive, heavy-duty and fleet market channels. NTN, the parent company of BCA Bearings, has hired Charles Harris as the director of automotive aftermarket sales and also has appointed Ed Magruder to the role of director of special market sales as of April 1.AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisement “Ed has been a valuable asset to NTN since he arrived in 2013,” said Judge. “With Ed’s extensive background and track record of success, I have full confidence that he will bring the AOES and Special Markets team to new level of success.” Prior to his arrival, Margruder spent more than 20 years with Navistar.last_img read more

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Carbon Trust to Join UN Network Providing Climate Technology Support to Developing Countries

first_imgThe Carbon Trust has been accepted as the latest Network member of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change’s (UNFCCC) Climate Technology Centre and Network (CTCN). The Carbon Trust will join the existing network, which currently consists of 20 organisations from across the world, to provide climate technology support to developing countries.The CTCN is a mechanism mandated by the UNFCCC Conference of the Parties, designed to support the transfer of climate technology – for both mitigation and adaptation – from developed to developing countries by providing Technical Assistance, at the request of developing countries.Hosted by the United Nations Environmental Programme (UNEP), with the support of the United Nations Industrial Development Organisation (UNIDO) and 11 independent climate organisations, the aim of the CTCN is to help developing countries move to low carbon and climate resilient development by responding to requests made by individual countries for climate technology-related technical assistance and capacity building.Welcoming the Carbon Trust to the Climate Technology Network, CTCN Director Jukka Uosukkainen said: “In becoming a Network member, the Carbon Trust has demonstrated its capabilities in initiatives aimed at the development, transfer and deployment of climate technologies applicable for developing countries including the areas of policy, capacity building and investment.”Tom Delay, Chief Executive, the Carbon Trust commented: “We wholeheartedly support the CTCN’s mission, which mirrors closely that of the Carbon Trust, to help developing nations move to low carbon and climate resilient development and welcome our acceptance onto the international Network. We have already found that our international experience in renewable energy and low carbon policy design, NAMA creation, climate technology programme design and incubation support for entrepreneurs to be highly valuable in supporting the climate change mitigation ambitions in developing countries. We believe the CTCN will make a big difference in the transfer and deployment of climate technology to developing countries.”The Climate Technology Centre’s Network members contribute their sectoral and, or regional expertise in a broad range of climate technologies by bidding to provide services in response to individual countries’ climate technology requests. In addition, Network members engage with one another and with the National Designated Entities, the CTCN’s focal points in each country, on technology needs, solutions and climate technology capacity building.[mappress mapid=”14532″]Press release; Image: Vattenfall (Illustration)last_img read more

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